Author Topic: The real Ernest Hemingway  (Read 2352 times)

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Offline Traditional Guy 20

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The real Ernest Hemingway
« on: January 21, 2014, 04:57:04 PM »
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  • Ah yes who could forget Ernest Hemingway! The great writer, bull-fighter, big-game hunter, supporter of Republicans during the Spanish Civil War-whoops, hmm that's not good.

    Ernest Hemingway, the great writer of such books as A Farewell to Arms (a leftist work), The Sun Also Rises (a leftist work)---hmm this guy is actually considered a great writer?

    Ernest Hemingway, an author that Catholic schools in the 1950's couldn't soak up enough of his works---hmm this man is actually great?

    Anyway, as you can see even though Ernest Hemingway has entered into the American pantheon of grat American writers, he was actually no one to actually praise or commend, and I need not also mention his suicide (which still landed him in a Catholic burial) or all of his affairs either.

    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #1 on: January 21, 2014, 05:01:18 PM »
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  • Ah I see we have the down-thumb stampede again. For the person who down-thumbed me, reading Ernest Hemingway does not make you cultured, but on the contary, makes you very leftist.


    Offline Matto

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #2 on: January 21, 2014, 05:02:46 PM »
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  • I used to own several Ernest Hemingway books, but I threw them in the trash after I converted.
    I Love Watching Butterflies . . ..

    Offline holysoulsacademy

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 05:28:35 PM »
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  •  :sleep: :sleep: :sleep:

    Yes, it was required reading for high school, along with many other most-forgettable books.

    His writing just never did anything for me, give me a recipe book anyday.

     :chef: :chef: :chef:

    Offline holysoulsacademy

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #4 on: January 21, 2014, 05:30:31 PM »
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  • Quote from: Traditional Guy 20
    Ah I see we have the down-thumb stampede again. For the person who down-thumbed me, reading Ernest Hemingway does not make you cultured, but on the contary, makes you very leftist.


    It was books like his that the Spaniards wanted to keep away from the Indios that is why they never taught them to read.


    Offline Graham

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #5 on: January 21, 2014, 06:03:19 PM »
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  • Hemingway was also a violent drunk, a womanizer, and an inveterate liar, according to Paul Johnson in his book Intellectuals.

    Offline Joe

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #6 on: January 21, 2014, 06:47:27 PM »
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  • Quote from: Graham
    Hemingway was also a violent drunk, a womanizer, and an inveterate liar, according to Paul Johnson in his book Intellectuals.


    Everyone has faults.  Personally I loved The Old Man and the Sea and thought that For Whom the Bell Tolls was a great perspective on war.  As to his personal life, that's none of my concern.
    Club sandwiches not seals.

    Failure is always an option.  Just not always the best option.

    Offline crossbro

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #7 on: January 21, 2014, 10:13:16 PM »
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  • Why are attacking Hemmingway now, just thought I would ask ?


    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #8 on: January 22, 2014, 06:16:52 PM »
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  • Quote from: Joe
    Everyone has faults.  Personally I loved The Old Man and the Sea and thought that For Whom the Bell Tolls was a great perspective on war.  As to his personal life, that's none of my concern.


    And what about him being a leftist author and supporting the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War?

    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    The real Ernest Hemingway
    « Reply #9 on: January 23, 2014, 04:22:06 PM »
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  • Quote from: crossbro
    Why are attacking Hemmingway now, just thought I would ask ?


    Because he is seen as one of the best writers of the twentieth century.

    Plot summary for The Sun Also Rises (1926)

    "The protagonist of The Sun Also Rises is Jake Barnes, an expatriate American journalist living in Paris. Jake suffered a war wound that left him impotent; the nature of his injury is not explicitly described. He is in love with Lady Brett Ashley, a twice-divorced Englishwoman. Brett, with her bobbed hair and numerous love affairs, embodies the new sexual freedom of the 1920s.

    Book One is set in the café society of Paris. In the opening scenes, Jake plays tennis with his college friend Robert Cohn, picks up a prostitute (Georgette), and runs into Brett and Count Mippipopolous in a nightclub. Later, Brett tells Jake she loves him, but they both know that they have no chance at a stable relationship.

    In Book Two, Jake is joined by Bill Gorton, recently arrived from New York, and Brett's fiancé Mike Campbell, who arrives from Scotland. Jake and Bill travel south and meet Robert Cohn at Bayonne for a fishing trip in the hills northeast of Pamplona. Instead of fishing, Cohn stays in Pamplona to wait for the overdue Brett and Mike. Cohn had an affair with Brett a few weeks earlier and still feels possessive of her despite her engagement to Mike. After Jake and Bill enjoy five days of tranquility fishing the streams near Burguete, they rejoin the group in Pamplona where they begin to drink heavily. Cohn's presence is increasingly resented by the others, who taunt him with anti-semitic remarks. During the fiesta the characters drink, eat, watch the running of the bulls, attend bullfights, and bicker with each other. Jake introduces Brett to the 19-year-old matador Romero at the Hotel Montoya; she is smitten with him and seduces him. The jealous tension among the men builds—Jake, Campbell, Cohn, and Romero each love Brett. Cohn, who had been a champion boxer in college, has fistfights with Jake, Mike, and Romero, whom he beats up. Despite his injuries, Romero continues to perform brilliantly in the bullring.

    Book Three shows the characters in the aftermath of the fiesta. Sober again, they leave Pamplona; Bill returns to Paris, Mike stays in Bayonne, and Jake goes to San Sebastián in northeastern Spain. As Jake is about to return to Paris, he receives a telegram from Brett asking for help; she had gone to Madrid with Romero. He finds her there in a cheap hotel, without money, and without Romero. She announces she has decided to go back to Mike. The novel ends with Jake and Brett in a taxi speaking of the things that might have been."

    Ah yes he wrote so many good books didn't he? :rolleyes:



     

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