Author Topic: Dragons and dinosaurs  (Read 1653 times)

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Offline bodeens

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Re: Dragons and dinosaurs
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2021, 12:05:28 AM »
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  • Something escaped from wuhan lab.
    lol! In all seriousness though... It's quite possible dragons were hunted to extinction and there's some sort of Jurassic Park style experimentation to bring them back.
    "We dare not even start to hope until the Faith, the true Faith, and its revealed content, are secured in our minds. Only in terms of Faith do we dare to hope."

    Offline StLouisIX

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    Re: Dragons and dinosaurs
    « Reply #16 on: December 03, 2021, 02:59:04 PM »
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  • Commentary from the Haydock Bible concerning this verse:

    "And there was a great dragon in that place, and the Babylonians worshiped him." (Daniel 14:22)


    Ver. 22.  Dragon.  The devil had seduced our first parents in the form of a serpent, and caused most nations to adore it.  C. --- They expected benefit, or to be preserved from harm.  Valer. i. 8.  S. Aug. de Civ. Dei. xiv. 11.  W.

    Citation here


    Offline StLouisIX

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    Re: Dragons and dinosaurs
    « Reply #17 on: December 26, 2021, 05:02:26 PM »
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  • Some literary references of flying dragons from Scandinavia:

    Excerpt from the Saga of Ketil Trout:


    Quote
    One evening after sunset Ketil took his ax in hand and went north toward an island. But he had not gotten very far away from the farm when he saw a dragon flying southward toward him from some rocky cliffs. It had a coil and a tail like a wyrm but wings like a dragon. Fire seemed to burn forth from its eyes and maw. Ketil thought he had never seen such a fish or any other such evil creature, and he would rather have had to defend himself against a host of men. The dragon attacked him, but Ketil defended himself well and manfully with his ax. So it went for a long while until Ketil was able to strike the coil and cut the dragon in two. It fell down dead.

    (The Penguin Book of Dragons, pgs. 78-79)


    Excerpt from the Saga of Þiðrekr of Bern:

    Quote
    They [Þiðrekr and Fasold] see a huge flying dragon (flugdreka). It is both long and stout; it has thick legs and claws both sharp and long. Its head is huge and terrifying. It flies along close to the ground and everywhere its claws rake the earth, it was as if the sharpest iron blade had struck it. In its mouth it is carrying a man [Sistram] and had swallowed his legs and everything up to his arms. His head and shoulders were sticking out of its mouth. His arms were in the lower jaws, and the man was still alive...They leap from their horses and draw their swords and both strike the dragon at the same time. Þiðrekr's sword cut somewhat, but Fasold's not at all. Although the dragon was big and strong, it was beyond its power to carry the man along with the weapons, and it could not rise aloft to fly or to defend itself, as it would have done if it were free. Then the man in the dragon's mouth said to Fasold: "I see that your sword does not cut into him because he is so tough-skinned. Take the sword here in the dragon's jaws; it is more likely to cut almost anything that comes under its blade, if a brave man wields it...Strike carefully. My legs have gone way down into the dragon's throat and you should take care because I do not want to be wounded by my own sword...Strike hard, good lads, because the evil dragon is squeezing me so hard with his jaws that blood is springing from my mouth and I do not know how all of this is going to turn out." Now they both struck with mighty strokes until the dragon was dead. The man was now set free from the dragon's mouth.

    (The Penguin Book of Dragons, pg. 79)


    Offline StLouisIX

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    Re: Dragons and dinosaurs
    « Reply #18 on: December 26, 2021, 05:30:06 PM »
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  • Why Dragons Fear Lighting 

    An excerpt from Byzantine imperial court intellectual Michael Psellos (1018-ca.1075):


    Quote
    ...Is it true what what some people say, that the race of dragons fears lighting-fire, or even that this fire is actually waging a war against dragons and that it targets them with an irresistible momentum, propelled by almost voluntary powers? And what are we to make of the sights we observe in the blaze of lightning, which sometimes imitate one animal, and sometimes another?....

    As for dragons, I have not yet, to this day, come across any treatise that explains, in the terms of natural science, why they fear lightning. So once the first person has done so [that is, Psellos himself] —and I too will refer it to my conception of nature —then perhaps another person will give a more exact interpretation of it. 

    I, then, say that the race of dragons is dry by nature and fiery in substance. Even their eyes blaze forth with fire and the venom they vomit forth is smoky and it dissolves any bodies that it touches. Thus, dragons are vulnerable to fire on account of their dryness and they are liable to be burned up. Hence, they fear lightning and leap through the air looking for enclosed spaces under the earth, especially around lakes and cisterns, since, as I said, they are vulnerable to fire on account of their dryness and can be burned up by lightning fire, even from a distance. That is why, wherever a dragon appears, hissing as it passes through, lightning strikes there, ravaging the adjacent areas. It is often the case that rattling, hissing, and grunting sounds are heard even without a dragon present...But if a malicious demon should take on the body of a dragon and, pursued by fire, should lead the beast to those places where the demon was already accustomed to spread its malice, this account is not to be rejected entirely out of hand. For this is the ancient agenda of that race, on account of which it formerly drove us out of Paradise and is now attempting, again through its ill-omened malice, to remove us from the earth as well. 

    (The Penguin Book of Dragons, pgs. 120-121)


    The details about dragons being afraid of lightning are quite strange, but I think it is more important to take notice of how Psellos describes, in the highlighted section, dragons can be possessed by demons. It confirms the opinions of some who say that dragons spoken of in historical accounts were, at least in part, of demonic origin.