Author Topic: Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"  (Read 791 times)

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Offline stevusmagnus

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http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2010/10/veneration-of-relics-is-sad-chapter-in.html

Wow...

From Anscar Chupungco's What, Then, is Liturgy?: Musings and Memoir, Claretian Publications, Quezon City 2010, pp. 51-52:

The veneration of the bodies or relics of saints is a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy. In the Middle Ages dealers made a big business out of the sale of bones purportedly of saints but later discovered, thanks to modern technology, to be of animals. Unsuspecting devotees brought them and built magnificent chapels to house richly Italicadorned reliquaries. When I was a student in Europe it was one of my diversions to look for some of the most amusing kinds of relics: a feather of St. Michael the Archangel, a piece of cloth stained with the milk of the Blessed Virgin, one of the prepuces of the Child Jesus, and believe it or not, a bottle containing the darkness of Egypt! The great reformer Martin Luther, appalled by aberrations committed on relics, fiercely took issue with the Catholic Church. Indeed, who would not be scandalized by reports that when priests were compelled to celebrate only one Mass a day to stifle the abuses surrounding Mass stipends, some had the temerity to simulate the Mass and raise the relic of a saint at the supposed moment of consecration? I can still hear my mentor Adrian Nocent's dismissive remark when he listened to stories of relics, private apparitions, and saccharine devotions: "It's another religion!"
...
Abstracting from the deviations of the past and from the odd practice of displaying dismembered parts of the bodies of saints for public veneration, it is important to keep in mind that the liturgy gives special honor to the human body, whether it is of a great saint or a departed ordinary Christian...
(END OF QUOTE)
Adrian Nocent OSB was one of the leading lights of the liturgical reform of the 1960's.

Offline stevusmagnus

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Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2010, 03:45:00 PM »
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  • If I were given the text of this quote without the author, I would have sworn it came off the pages of FE....


    Offline Classiccom

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    Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
    « Reply #2 on: October 17, 2010, 05:41:58 PM »
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  •   Now would be a good time to think about preserving pre vatican II altars , chalices etc. As times get darker, having these items would be good for the underground Church. The criminals running the Novus Ordo will probably have them destroyed or desecrated.

    Offline St Jude Thaddeus

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    Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
    « Reply #3 on: October 17, 2010, 06:17:36 PM »
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  • Quote from: stevusmagnus
    I can still hear my mentor Adrian Nocent's dismissive remark when he listened to stories of relics, private apparitions, and saccharine devotions: "It's another religion!"

    Adrian Nocent OSB was one of the leading lights of the liturgical reform of the 1960's.


    The only part he got right was the quote I boldfaced! It certainly is another religion, there's no doubt about it!
    St. Jude, who, disregarding the threats of the impious, courageously preached the doctrine of Christ,
    pray for us.

    Offline Caraffa

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    Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
    « Reply #4 on: October 17, 2010, 07:18:59 PM »
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  • Quote
    The veneration of the bodies or relics of saints is a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy


    St. Jerome and St. John Damascene would disagree.
    Pray for me, always.


    Offline stevusmagnus

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    Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
    « Reply #5 on: October 17, 2010, 08:58:07 PM »
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  • Here is one comment:

    Quote
    There's actually a lot in this excerpt that we should take to heart. What this writer described is real history, folks, not anti-Catholic agit-prop.

    And I for one agree with him that the OBSESSION that so many "conservative" and "traditional" Catholics have for private revelations is very oft-putting to many of us even within the Church, and does at times seem to be "another religion".

    I'm not dissing a respectful belief in miracles (apparitions included),or the veneration relics and images. But we have to admit this often does get excessive, and did even more so in popular medieval folk superstition. There's nothing unCatholic in saying so.

    Offline Alexandria

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    Veneration of relics is "a sad chapter in the history of the liturgy"
    « Reply #6 on: October 18, 2010, 01:30:27 PM »
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  • Quote from: stevusmagnus
    Here is one comment:

    Quote
    There's actually a lot in this excerpt that we should take to heart. What this writer described is real history, folks, not anti-Catholic agit-prop.

    And I for one agree with him that the OBSESSION that so many "conservative" and "traditional" Catholics have for private revelations is very oft-putting to many of us even within the Church, and does at times seem to be "another religion".

    I'm not dissing a respectful belief in miracles (apparitions included),or the veneration relics and images. But we have to admit this often does get excessive, and did even more so in popular medieval folk superstition. There's nothing unCatholic in saying so.


    The commenter is right.  Except I wouldn't lable them "conservative" and certainly not "traditional" - more like neo-cons who are liberals at heart.  

    This taking around of relics - St. Therese, St. John Vianney, St. John Bosco - to churches and crowds of people showing up, sometimes waiting hours on line, doesn't anyone here find it strange that people would go to such lengths to venerate the bones of a human being, and here they have Our Lord truly present in the Blessed Sacrament and He is just ignored?

     

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