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Offline Telesphorus

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Offline John Grace

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Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 10:26:41 AM »
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  • Of course the book suppressed by Bishop Fellay.


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
    « Reply #2 on: November 30, 2012, 08:02:29 PM »
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  • Quote from: John Grace
    Of course the book suppressed by Bishop Fellay.


    When did +Fellay suppress it?  What did he say?  What did he do?

    Sorry, I must have missed that memo..................  :furtive:

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    Offline Telesphorus

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    Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
    « Reply #3 on: November 30, 2012, 08:17:40 PM »
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  • Quote from: Neil Obstat
    Quote from: John Grace
    Of course the book suppressed by Bishop Fellay.


    When did +Fellay suppress it?  What did he say?  What did he do?

    Sorry, I must have missed that memo..................  :furtive:



    Quote from: hollingsworth blog
    The original essay appeared only in French, a copy of which fell into the hands of a traditional Catholic friend of ours. This friend thought it would be a good idea to translate the work into English for circulation abroad among English speaking readers. That translation was accomplished.


    Subsequently, the 82 page essay was published on Stephen Heiner's True Restoration blog spot. But Bp. Tissier, very soon after its publication, asked that the essay be removed and not be made available to the public. I'll leave the 'Why?' of that request for the reader to figure out. His Grace obviously wrote the paper to be read, but, apparently, for the consumption only of a limited readership.


    http://wwwthollingsworth.blogspot.com/2010/03/bishop-tisseir-de-mallerais-uncensored.html

    Offline Lighthouse

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    Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
    « Reply #4 on: November 30, 2012, 09:41:32 PM »
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  • The word hermeneutic is possibly the ugliest word ever invented.

    To a modernist it means two contradictory statements that can be allowed to stand as equivalent by introducing a peculiar understanding.

    Named after the Greek demon that symbolized ambiguity and held out the alchemical lie of gold from garbage, it is a promise kept alive by gnostic mystery cults up through the openly satanic secret societies of the present


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
    « Reply #5 on: December 06, 2012, 02:03:24 PM »
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  • Quote from: Lighthouse
    The word hermeneutic is possibly the ugliest word ever invented.

    To a modernist it means two contradictory statements that can be allowed to stand as equivalent by introducing a peculiar understanding.

    Named after the Greek demon that symbolized ambiguity and held out the alchemical lie of gold from garbage, it is a promise kept alive by gnostic mystery cults up through the openly satanic secret societies of the present


    I did some checking and the most common factor in the descriptions of
    Hermes is that it was his job to conduct departed souls to the underworld.

    That sounds a lot to me like taking your a** to hell.  But I did not copy
    any of those references below.   I'm looking for this other thing...



    I'd like to know where this comes from:  "two contradictory statements
    that can be allowed to stand as equivalent by introducing a peculiar
    understanding."  From the information below, the only clue I see is the
    caduceus:

    "Hermes' symbol of office as divine messenger was his staff, or caduceus. This was originally a willow wand with entwined ribbons, traditional badge of the herald. But the ribbons were eventually depicted as snakes."

    This appears to be the derivation of the logo that the AMA uses for
    physicians:



    This may be explained by this entry for caduceus in Mythological Dictionary:

    caduceus
    In Latin the herald's staff was known as the caduceum, derived from the Greek word keryx or herald, and his staff the kerykeion. Hermes, as divine messenger, was invariably depicted with the caduceus, which was represented as a staff with white ribbons or intertwined snakes. The white ribbons may have indicated the inviolability of his office. The image of intertwined snake may have been drawn from the near eastern use of copulating snakes as a symbol of fertility, for Hermes was a fertility god. The staff of Hermes became confused with the staff of Asclepius, the renowned mythic physician and son of Apollo because some stories about Asclepius involved snakes and the reptile has the ability to slough its old skin and seemingly be "reborn," and so had associations with healing.



    A website page - Hermeneutic.org - begins thus:


    Hermeneutic

    Hermeneutic ˌhər-mə-ˈnü-tik, Hermeneutical ˌhər-mə-ˈnü-ti-kəl, a. [Greek 'ερμηνεύς, to interpret: cf. F. herméneutique.] Unfolding the signification; of or pertaining to interpretation; exegetical; explanatory; as, hermeneutic theology, or the art of expounding the Scriptures; a hermeneutic phrase. From Hermes [Greek Ἑρμῆς] the messenger of the gods.


    It goes on to give references it relates to Maimonides, who promoted
    charitable giving.




    Another site has this, regarding the mythology of Hermes:

    HERMES (HUR-meez; Roman name Mercury) was the messenger of the gods and guide of dead souls to the Underworld. A prankster and inventive genius from birth, Hermes aided the heroes Odysseus and Perseus in their quests.

    Hermes was the son Zeus and a mountain nymph. As a newborn he was remarkably precocious. On his very first day of life, he found the empty shell of a tortoise and perceived its utility as a sounding chamber. Stringing sinews across it, he created the first lyre.

    Hermes was known for his helpfulness to mankind, both in his capacity as immortal herald and on his own initiative. When Perseus set out to face the Gorgon Medusa, Hermes aided him in the quest. According to one version of the myth, he loaned the hero his own magic sandals, which conferred upon the wearer the ability to fly.

    Some say that Hermes loaned Perseus a helmet of invisibility as well. Also known as the helmet of darkness, this was the same headgear that Hermes himself had worn when he vanquished the giant Hippolytus. This was on the occasion when the gargantuan sons of Earth rose up in revolt against the gods of Olympus.

    Hermes' symbol of office as divine messenger was his staff, or caduceus. This was originally a willow wand with entwined ribbons, traditional badge of the herald. But the ribbons were eventually depicted as snakes. To support this mythologically, a story evolved that Hermes used the caduceus to separate two fighting snakes which forthwith twined themselves together in peace.

    It was Hermes' job to convey dead souls to the Underworld. And as patron of travelers, he was often shown in a wide-brimmed sun hat of straw. Hermes was known to the Romans as Mercury. His most famous depiction, a statue by Bellini, shows him alight on one foot, wings at his heels, the snaky caduceus in hand and, on his head, a rather stylized combination helmet-of-darkness and sun hat.




    I have heard it explained that B16's endearment with the term
    "hermeneutic" is based in his fascination with Jewish doctrines or the
    the teachings of certain rabbis.  I cannot verify this, however.  Nor do
    I recall the source:   something I heard that impressed me, is all I can
    say.  

    I do recall a sermon of Fr. Pfeiffer recently that contains a story of two
    bishops who cannot see eye-to-eye.  They disagree.  They disagree over
    the subject matter of light bulbs.  One hates light bulbs ("I hate light
    bulbs!").  And the other loves light bulbs ("I love light bulbs!").   There
    is no way for these two bishops to get along, but they have a desire to
    make peace with each other.   Along comes a wise man, who tells them,
    "I kin shows you how you kin b'come friends.  Alls y'all need-a-do is, say:
    'Ah'm near a light bulb,' and y'all kin be friends."   So the bishop who hates
    light bulbs ("I hate light bulbs") and the bishop who loves light bulbs
    ("But I love light bulbs") both say, "I am near a light bulb."  And they
    become friends.




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    Offline Lighthouse

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    Book on the hermeneutic of continuity
    « Reply #6 on: December 09, 2012, 10:27:07 PM »
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  • Quote
    I'd like to know where this comes from:  "two contradictory statements
    that can be allowed to stand as equivalent by introducing a peculiar
    understanding."


    It comes from me. You'll need to pay royalties if you're going to use it.

     :farmer:

     

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