Read an Interview with Matthew, the owner of CathInfo

Author Topic: There is a very weird thing  (Read 965 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pelly

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 637
  • Reputation: +118/-0
There is a very weird thing
« on: June 13, 2013, 03:28:34 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Why do Protestants quote the Church Fathers? They believe in the early heresies in their age, but don't accept Catholicism, as the Christianity of the Fathers had many Catholic elements.

    Offline Nadir

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 5089
    • Reputation: +2847/-104
    • Gender: Female
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #1 on: June 13, 2013, 11:36:49 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Each protestant has his own set of beliefs. So any protestant can believe some things that some Church Fathers taught.

    He can pick and choose. That's what being a protestant means. But none can take all the teachings of the Church Fathers.


    Offline Mabel

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 1893
    • Reputation: +1379/-1
    • Gender: Female
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #2 on: June 14, 2013, 01:33:29 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Ignorance of history, many do not understand that these men were Catholic priests. By studying the fathers they are attempting to give themselves some legitimacy by establishing connection with the early Church. It doesn't work and it isn't convincing.

    One thing that gets me...prots studying St. Augustine like he was one of them. Just crazy.

    Offline Stephen Francis

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 682
    • Reputation: +861/-0
    • Gender: Male
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #3 on: June 14, 2013, 06:42:23 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • There are those who practically rank Augustine only slightly below St. Paul. Of course, there are also those who teach (and I have heard this said in person) that the Words of Our Lord Jesus Christ are remnants of the age of Law (a term connected with the Prot dispensationalist error) and that His words, for instance in the Beatitudes, are not applicable to Christians today. Furthermore, if some statement of Jesus Christ is seemingly at odds with the words of St. Paul, then the Apostle's words take precedence because they are for the so-called 'church age'.

    Let that idea sink in and you'll never call a Protestant a Christian again. That's heresy on the highest level.

    St. Anthony of Padua, hammer of heretics, terror of Hell, pray for us.

    Immaculate Heart of Mary, triumph soon!

    Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, have mercy on us.
    This evil of heresy spreads itself. The doctrines of godliness are overturned; the rules of the Church are in confusion; the ambition of the unprincipled seizes upon places of authority; and the chief seat [the Papacy] is now openly proposed as a rewar

    Offline Elizabeth

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 4847
    • Reputation: +2190/-1
    • Gender: Female
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #4 on: June 15, 2013, 08:16:56 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Mabel
    Ignorance of history, many do not understand that these men were Catholic priests. By studying the fathers they are attempting to give themselves some legitimacy by establishing connection with the early Church. It doesn't work and it isn't convincing.

    One thing that gets me...prots studying St. Augustine like he was one of them. Just crazy.

     :applause:

    Staggering ignorance, and pride.  Unable to comprehend that all of the old cathedrals and monasteries in Europe were Catholic, for example.  There is a good pamphlet titled, 'How Old is Your Church?'.  The fact that they can read is thanks to Catholic monks.  Sadly, I have no patience with the stuff they come up with.



    Offline Tiffany

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3111
    • Reputation: +1639/-9
    • Gender: Female
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #5 on: June 15, 2013, 08:52:02 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Mabel
    Ignorance of history, many do not understand that these men were Catholic priests. By studying the fathers they are attempting to give themselves some legitimacy by establishing connection with the early Church. It doesn't work and it isn't convincing.

    One thing that gets me...prots studying St. Augustine like he was one of them. Just crazy.


    I'm glad they do. It was the reason I wanted to convert when I learned that Aquinas and the others like Augustine were Catholic. We are basing our theology on them, either they are heretics or they aren't. I wouldn't say the motive is to give legitimacy. many study in an attempt to learn more about theology and God.

    It's wonderful The Church does that for us, and gives us a framework/reference for it all and interprets it too, and it's a closed system. I didn't know that, until this winter when I heard Bishop Williamson lecture about Kant.

    One thing to add,  I'm sure it was helpful that I was taught that Catholics were not Christians instead of this kumbaya everyone sings and hold hands ecumenical garbage. When I learned that they were Catholic, it couldn't all be.  

    Offline Luker

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 507
    • Reputation: +639/-0
    • Gender: Male
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #6 on: June 15, 2013, 01:57:06 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I certainly can't speak for all Protestant sects, but as a former Protestant of the evangelical/charismatic sort, I knew nothing at all of the Church Fathers, or any early Catholic Christian writers.  From the end of the Acts of the Apostles to around the Protestant Revolt ~1517 was basically a 15 century blank spot in my history  :stare: In fact it was recognizing this deficiency and beginning to read Church history a couple of years ago, that I encountered the Catholic Church and was converted. Imagine my surprise when I started reading and found all kinds of writings from Catholics from the first few centuries of the Church!  I happened upon some pastoral letters of Pope St Gregory the Great that I read and really enjoyed, reading those letters were instrumental in my conversion process.  Thank you St Gregory!!!

    Luke
    Pray the Holy Rosary every day!!

    Offline Mabel

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 1893
    • Reputation: +1379/-1
    • Gender: Female
    There is a very weird thing
    « Reply #7 on: June 15, 2013, 03:41:03 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Tiffany
    Quote from: Mabel
    Ignorance of history, many do not understand that these men were Catholic priests. By studying the fathers they are attempting to give themselves some legitimacy by establishing connection with the early Church. It doesn't work and it isn't convincing.

    One thing that gets me...prots studying St. Augustine like he was one of them. Just crazy.


    I'm glad they do. It was the reason I wanted to convert when I learned that Aquinas and the others like Augustine were Catholic. We are basing our theology on them, either they are heretics or they aren't. I wouldn't say the motive is to give legitimacy. many study in an attempt to learn more about theology and God.

    It's wonderful The Church does that for us, and gives us a framework/reference for it all and interprets it too, and it's a closed system. I didn't know that, until this winter when I heard Bishop Williamson lecture about Kant.

    One thing to add,  I'm sure it was helpful that I was taught that Catholics were not Christians instead of this kumbaya everyone sings and hold hands ecumenical garbage. When I learned that they were Catholic, it couldn't all be.  


    I do think they think it gives connection to the past and a false idea of legitimacy. The reason why they are studying them is because they believe that St. Augustine or St. Justin Martyr taught what they believe. They are using (twisting) the writings of the fathers to demonstrate that their beliefs are apostolic. I have friends who have studied the fathers extensively at their protestant colleges and they really think the fathers agree with them. This is all part of a movement to overcome some of the academic failings of protestant institutions because in the past they wholly ignored historical sources, they've wised up a bit and this is another strategy.

    There are all kinds of reasons for reading the Fathers by heretics, some are genuinely curious and ignorant. I'm not saying that it isn't a good thing to do but now the context has changed to one where Protestant beliefs are assumed to be supported by the Fathers. An issue within that is that there is a constant shift in the meaning of words, especially in the Prot. understanding of the meaning of "Church" for example. They are literally changing the meanings of words so that when they read the Fathers, if makes them right. I know of "Catholics" who participate and lead studies on St. Augustine with Protestants and they come out in 100% agreement on the interpretation of the text. Not to use St. Augustine repeatedly, but his works are trendy right now with Protestants who are attempting to be more intellectual.


     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16