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Offline John Grace

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James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
« on: May 28, 2013, 03:07:41 PM »
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  • http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/lost-memoir-tells-how-james-connolly-returned-to-his-faith-before-execution-29297110.html
    Quote
    INAL ACCOUNT: The Rev George Kendall OBE, above, spoke to James Connolly on the eve of the rebel leader’s execution
    TIM KENDALL – 26 MAY 2013

    A manuscript found in an old filing box of documents in England has revealed that in the hours before he was executed in Dublin in 1916, the Citizens' Army leader James Connolly returned to his Catholic faith.

    The manuscript with the title Daring All things – My Story was the unpublished autobiography of British Army chaplain George Kendall OBE and gives a first-hand account of the capture of the rebel leaders.

    Kendall, my grandfather, was chaplain to the 59th division of the British Army who were sent to Dublin to help put down the Rising. He describes in his memoir, completed in 1961, shortly before his death, the capture and execution of rebel leader James Connolly.

    "I saw James Connolly twice whilst he was in hospital, the second time being on the eve of his execution.

    "Speaking to me on the first visit, he said in answer to a question of mine about his attitude – 'You must know the saying.' 'What saying?' I asked. And he replied: 'The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.' This too was the saying I heard as I spoke to his men in the Dublin Castle hospital.

    "Listening, I felt it was not my duty to condemn, or argue. Connolly was, for years, a professed agnostic, but at the hour of death, he returned to the faith of his fathers. That night a Catholic priest was admitted to the hospital and he administered Holy Communion to Connolly and gave him absolution.

    "Asked to pray, at the end, for the soldiers about to shoot him, he said: 'I will say a prayer for all brave men who do their duty.'

    "And so he died, the last of the Sinn Feiners to be executed," he wrote in his memoir.

    Born in a small Yorkshire village, George Kendall became a Primitive Methodist Minister. In 1913, while canvassing for new members for his church outside Windsor Castle, he was invited to tea by Queen Mary and became a lifelong friend of the British royal.

    He was among the reinforcements rushed to Dublin in the aftermath of the 1916 Rebellion on Easter Sunday.

    "Personally, I was fond of the Irish people and therefore overwhelmed by this tragedy caused by the misguidance of the leaders of the rebellion," he wrote in his memoir, never before seen until I uncovered the book.

    "But there was another cause. Many loyal and committed men told me it was their considered opinion that the outbreak would have been impossible but for the gross and unpardonable laxity, long continued, of the Irish government at that time."

    He then goes on to describe the drama of the unfolding Rising and eventually the capture of its leaders.

    "The Mad Rising, as it was called by the Irish people, was a black one not only for Dublin and Ireland but for the whole of our empire of those days and our allies ... I stood in the middle of blazing streets with snipers' bullets whizzing around ... I entered Liberty Hall when it was captured ... I visited Dublin Castle and talked to our wounded and the Sinn Feiners. They were lying in the same wards and receiving the same treatment."

    After witnessing the capture of Markievicz "in her brilliant green male uniform", he was given her fur rug – and kept it for years "until it perished of moth".

    Kendall also briefed the British prime minister Herbert Henry Asquith when he came to Dublin in the aftermath of the Rising.

    Although he put some of his experiences in the memoir, including a brief chapter on Dublin in the aftermath of the Rising, he said, "half my story will remain untold" because of the confidential nature of his work.

    The family have never known about the book even though my parents honeymooned in Ireland and, in 1994, I flew all over the country by helicopter to photograph it for my own book, Ireland from the Air.

    Now I am hoping to have my grandfather's book published and his story of the First World War will be featured in a British television special later in the year.

    Irish Independent

    Offline Matthew

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 03:14:27 PM »
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  • James Connolly was mentioned in this song:

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/embed/iEWlpP3RIW8[/youtube]
    Start your Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!


    Offline John Grace

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 03:20:18 PM »
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  • There is a book but I forget which one that states that Connolly went to daily Mass whilst in New York.

    A sad episode in his life was the death of his eldest daughter in an accident the night before the family were to set sail to join him in America.

    Offline John Grace

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 03:25:39 PM »
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  • One thing the 'left' resent is Connolly stated 'Ireland for the Irish'

    In the Census
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000119513/

    He clearly lists himself as a  Catholic and declares that he can speak English and Irish.

    Offline John Grace

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 03:26:57 PM »
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  • As mentioned previously his Confessor Fr. Aloysius stated
    Quote
    Tuesday 2nd

    In the morning I gave Holy Communion to James Connolly. Later in the day I went with Father Augustine to Headquarters, Infirmary Road and met General (Sir John) Maxwell....
    When I reached Kilmainham Gaol I was informed that Thomas MacDonagh also wished for my ministrations. I was taken to the prisoners' cells and spent some hours between the two. "You will be glad to know that I gave Holy Communion to James Connolly this morning," I said to Pearse when I met him. "Thank God," he replied, "it is the one thing I was anxious about."


    Offline Sigismund

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 05:04:32 PM »
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  • Quote from: Matthew
    James Connolly was mentioned in this song:

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/embed/iEWlpP3RIW8[/youtube]


    That song did my Irish heart good.  Here's another song that mentions Connolly:

    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline CelticWarrior223

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #6 on: June 11, 2013, 09:32:55 PM »
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  • Quote from: John Grace
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/lost-memoir-tells-how-james-connolly-returned-to-his-faith-before-execution-29297110.html
    Quote
    INAL ACCOUNT: The Rev George Kendall OBE, above, spoke to James Connolly on the eve of the rebel leader’s execution
    TIM KENDALL – 26 MAY 2013

    A manuscript found in an old filing box of documents in England has revealed that in the hours before he was executed in Dublin in 1916, the Citizens' Army leader James Connolly returned to his Catholic faith.

    The manuscript with the title Daring All things – My Story was the unpublished autobiography of British Army chaplain George Kendall OBE and gives a first-hand account of the capture of the rebel leaders.

    Kendall, my grandfather, was chaplain to the 59th division of the British Army who were sent to Dublin to help put down the Rising. He describes in his memoir, completed in 1961, shortly before his death, the capture and execution of rebel leader James Connolly.

    "I saw James Connolly twice whilst he was in hospital, the second time being on the eve of his execution.

    "Speaking to me on the first visit, he said in answer to a question of mine about his attitude – 'You must know the saying.' 'What saying?' I asked. And he replied: 'The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.' This too was the saying I heard as I spoke to his men in the Dublin Castle hospital.

    "Listening, I felt it was not my duty to condemn, or argue. Connolly was, for years, a professed agnostic, but at the hour of death, he returned to the faith of his fathers. That night a Catholic priest was admitted to the hospital and he administered Holy Communion to Connolly and gave him absolution.

    "Asked to pray, at the end, for the soldiers about to shoot him, he said: 'I will say a prayer for all brave men who do their duty.'

    "And so he died, the last of the Sinn Feiners to be executed," he wrote in his memoir.

    Born in a small Yorkshire village, George Kendall became a Primitive Methodist Minister. In 1913, while canvassing for new members for his church outside Windsor Castle, he was invited to tea by Queen Mary and became a lifelong friend of the British royal.

    He was among the reinforcements rushed to Dublin in the aftermath of the 1916 Rebellion on Easter Sunday.

    "Personally, I was fond of the Irish people and therefore overwhelmed by this tragedy caused by the misguidance of the leaders of the rebellion," he wrote in his memoir, never before seen until I uncovered the book.

    "But there was another cause. Many loyal and committed men told me it was their considered opinion that the outbreak would have been impossible but for the gross and unpardonable laxity, long continued, of the Irish government at that time."

    He then goes on to describe the drama of the unfolding Rising and eventually the capture of its leaders.

    "The Mad Rising, as it was called by the Irish people, was a black one not only for Dublin and Ireland but for the whole of our empire of those days and our allies ... I stood in the middle of blazing streets with snipers' bullets whizzing around ... I entered Liberty Hall when it was captured ... I visited Dublin Castle and talked to our wounded and the Sinn Feiners. They were lying in the same wards and receiving the same treatment."

    After witnessing the capture of Markievicz "in her brilliant green male uniform", he was given her fur rug – and kept it for years "until it perished of moth".

    Kendall also briefed the British prime minister Herbert Henry Asquith when he came to Dublin in the aftermath of the Rising.

    Although he put some of his experiences in the memoir, including a brief chapter on Dublin in the aftermath of the Rising, he said, "half my story will remain untold" because of the confidential nature of his work.

    The family have never known about the book even though my parents honeymooned in Ireland and, in 1994, I flew all over the country by helicopter to photograph it for my own book, Ireland from the Air.

    Now I am hoping to have my grandfather's book published and his story of the First World War will be featured in a British television special later in the year.

    Irish Independent


    This is very good to know. I will use this, thank you. :cheers:

    Offline John Grace

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #7 on: June 13, 2013, 11:17:49 AM »
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  • I don't believe he ever lapsed in the faith. Only last night I watched a documentary about him and it mentioned he had to borrow his wife's shoes to go to work. Once or twice he stayed in bed as to give his dinner to a family member.

    The outrage at his execution whilst sitting in a chair and wounded possibly saved about 100 men from execution. The doctor present regarded him as a brave man. He held on to the chair and looked straight ahead whilst waiting for the volley of shots.


    Offline John Grace

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    James Connolly returned to his faith before execution
    « Reply #8 on: June 13, 2013, 11:27:09 AM »
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  • He had six children. His wife Lillie was received into the Catholic church after his death. His eldest daughter died when her apron got  caught under a  saucepan. It caught fire and she died of burns.

     

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