Author Topic: Is Ballet sinful?  (Read 3890 times)

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Offline Napoli

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Is Ballet sinful?
« on: June 23, 2013, 12:07:23 PM »
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  • I was recently at a Ballet. The women were dressed in typical ballet attire. Very revealing. The men also left nothing to the imagination. I was more disgusted by the men's clothing than the women's. I foundthe wwomen's to graceful.

    We are regular symohony/ballet/opera goers. But I wonder what everyone thinks?
    Regina Angelorum, ora pro nobis!

    Offline ServusSpiritusSancti

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #1 on: June 23, 2013, 12:12:19 PM »
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  • Ballet is immodest, I think. I would avoid it.


    Offline Tiffany

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #2 on: June 23, 2013, 12:15:39 PM »
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  • I don't know but with the high rate of psychiatric disease in ballet dancers I would be very cautious in allowing a child to take lessons.  

    Offline TheKnightVigilant

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #3 on: June 23, 2013, 01:50:17 PM »
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  • As I understand it ballet attire was, at one point, much more respectable.


    Offline claudel

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #4 on: June 23, 2013, 02:21:23 PM »
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  • Quote from: Napoli
    I was recently at a Ballet. The women were dressed in typical ballet attire. Very revealing. The men also left nothing to the imagination. I was more disgusted by the men's clothing than the women's. … I wonder what everyone thinks?


    If a book, even a perfectly innocent book, happens to be a proximate occasion of sin for you, don't read it. If the ballet is a proximate occasion of sin, don't go.

    Just be kind enough not to generalize about the morality of an art form that is among the noblest temporal creations of Western Christendom. Others ought to be slower, too, to generalize about the morality of dancers, whether professionals or students, as well as that of their teachers.**

    Nothing I've ever seen at a ballet or dance performance (with literally one or two nudie exceptions) even remotely compares with the pornographic display of today's track and field events, the Olympics being the worst of all. Now there is a truly proximate occasion of sin!

    **For the record, I worked at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for 26 years, and I regularly saw the NYC Ballet's great star Suzanne Farrell at Sunday Mass. Modestly dressed, need I say?


    Offline Telesphorus

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #5 on: June 23, 2013, 02:37:29 PM »
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  • Quote from: Claudel
    Nothing I've ever seen at a ballet or dance performance (with literally one or two nudie exceptions)


    Didn't you say the opera has become tainted?  But you give ballet a clean bill of health?

    They always have dancers from the local ballet at the opera here, and unfortunately they often dance suggestively.  For example, at a recent performance of Don Giovanni.

    Offline Matto

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #6 on: June 23, 2013, 02:48:38 PM »
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  • Ballet dancers tend to dress immodestly.
    I Love Watching Butterflies . . ..

    Offline Zeitun

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #7 on: June 23, 2013, 03:28:54 PM »
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  • I'm pretty certain opera was condemned (although not dogmatically) by a pope.  Can't remember who.  Ballet can be done modestly.  For example The Nutcracker Suite has a nice story and the costumes can be done without being vulgar.


    Online songbird

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #8 on: June 23, 2013, 03:57:18 PM »
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  • If you do research, you could find out who is $ supporting the "arts".  Federal grants  can most certainly be there.  We have 2 on stage theaters in  our area and more in the Phoenix area.  In our area, I noticed in 1990 we went to a play and it was almost nudity. Over half of the audience left at intermission.  The management of the theater was most delightful from 1987-90 and we went often.  Needless to say, we never went back again.  I researched to find that Planned Parenthood was a supporter and grants were received of this theater.  They begged our city for $350,000 for their losses this year. Well, they had a stage play of "bullying" with a youth who played the part of being homosexual, the one being bullied.  The city council voted the $350,000 loan out.  Then the next week, it was accepted!  Go figure.  We had a phone call from the city wanting to give us a survey asking about what more rec's we desired and I spouted off, your theater is a sewer and PP involved.  You can tell your council members they won't get a penny from us over our dead bodies..

    the other theater is a supper and stage.  We went once and we researched and watched for the same thing.  They started "adult" night time on stage and well, you can guess what that was.  So, there goes the "arts"!  The federal gov't like communism wants to get their agenda in every nook and cranny!

    We should go back to the fiddle and piano in the home.

    Offline Hatchc

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #9 on: June 23, 2013, 06:33:04 PM »
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  • I don't think ballerina's incite lust in many men. They have boy bodies. I also find athletic bodies on women unattractive, so I never feel lust when I watch female athletes.

    Offline Sigismund

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #10 on: June 23, 2013, 07:28:26 PM »
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  • I go to the ballet once in awhile.  It has never been anything like a near occasion of sin for me.  If I found it to be, I would avoid it.  
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


    Offline Napoli

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #11 on: June 23, 2013, 09:49:35 PM »
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  • Ballet is beautiful and enjoyable. I was just wondering what other traditional catholics felt. I won't stop going.
    Regina Angelorum, ora pro nobis!

    Offline Stephen Francis

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #12 on: June 24, 2013, 07:31:52 AM »
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  • Most modern ballet outfits are immodest because most ballet companies follow the example of Russian ballet groups, which are motivated by atheistic humanism. The physical body is to be admired and celebrated because human achievement is the greatest and highest goal one can aspire to.

    I can understand the artistry inherent in ballet, but, as many have said, one must be extremely careful to avoid occasions of sin. With the arts programs in so many places being funded by the Freemason-Jew world order, occasions of sin are lurking everywhere.

    Pray the Rosary for the salvation of souls!

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    Offline claudel

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #13 on: June 24, 2013, 03:45:36 PM »
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  • Quote from: Stephen Francis
    Most modern ballet outfits are immodest because most ballet companies follow the example of Russian ballet groups, which are motivated by atheistic humanism.


    May I take it as given that you haven't gone to the beach since 1938? Aside from a bit of walking around shore towns on Cape Cod on chilly September days, I myself haven't been to a proper beach since 1966, but even then what was on general display was infinitely raunchier than what can be seen at an authentic classical ballet performance of today. Anyone who's really on the prowl for the sordid and the vile will, of course, have little or no trouble finding it—but when was that otherwise?
    ____________________________________________________

    Whatever Russian influence exists in the international dance world stems mainly from the Mariinsky Theatre company of old St. Petersburg and dates from the period 1860–1910; that is, well prior to the Judaeo-atheist Bolshevik Revolution.

    Furthermore, the principal choreographers and ballet masters of the St. Petersburg Ballet during that period were, first, Arthur Saint-Léon and then the great Marius Petipa. Both of these gentlemen were French, incidentally. What is more, the leading dancers of the company were largely Italian, French, and here and there a German. So much for the Russianness of "Russian ballet groups."

    None of this ought to surprise anyone with a more than skin deep interest in ballet, since the form made its greatest advances in the 1830s through the 1850s in Italy and France. What is still more, none of this should surprise anyone who understands anything about Peter the Great and his development of St. Petersburg as a "window to the West."

    Yet even in that arch-Russian city, Moscow, many of the Bolshoi Theatre company's leading lights—choreographers, directors, principal dancers—were western Europeans. As readers of War and Peace ought to remember, a quarter of the book is written in French to accurately represent the usual language choice of the upper-crust characters that make up the bulk of its dramatis personae (even those far more down-to-earth Muscovites, the Rostovs—Natasha's family—all spoke French save en famille).

    While it is true that by the late 1930s, the long-sustained Russian Orthodox and Tsarist elements had been utterly expunged from both the Bolshoi and Kirov companies, the plain fact is that the tradition of dance brought to London and most of all here to the States (originally by Diaghilev's famed Ballets Russes—note the Froggie name!) is that of the Tsarist period. That is to say, it was preeminently the Petipa tradition—sometimes called the Petipa-Ivanov tradition, to give due regard to Lev Ivanov, Petipa's sole important Russian associate from the late 1880s on. But Ivanov was a Petipa disciple down to his marrow, not some proto-Bolshevik atheist swine.

    Since 1940, the major influence on classical dance in every respect and in every country (ask any academically trained Russian or German or French dancer or dance student if you don't believe me) was and remains George Balanchine (+1983). However messy his private life was at times, Balanchine was no Marxist, no atheist, no Freemason, no Jew. In founding and directing the New York City Ballet and its accompanying school, which was run with a strictness aptly described as monastic—pre-Vatican II monastic, that is—he plainly invoked the traditions of the Mariinsky Theatre company and its school, at which he was trained and whose Petipan methods and artistic ideals he worked at replicating in the West. He had no truck with onstage nudity, pornography, or indecency of any sort, though I will certainly grant that anyone who finds the Anna-Vronsky segments of the plot of Anna Karenina too steamy or smutty for sinless consumption probably should steer clear of a revival of Bugaku and one or two others of his 150-plus ballets.
    _______________________________________________

    My point in this, my second and last comment on this thread, is not that, as a form, ballet is ipso facto a vessel of sweetness and light. It certainly isn't, nor is it likely that anything new being produced, in ballet or in any other of the (once) high arts, is worthwhile at any level or in any way. That's just how things are—how virtually all things are—today. Think of the crowd that holds the reins in politics, in finance, in "news and information," in "entertainment": everything they touch they befoul and distort. Everything they control, if it ever had value, becomes a fun-house-mirror version of itself. In sum, everything is in the process of being reframed in line with "the movies," that bastard business-cum-"entertainment" form they have run almost since its corporate inception (that is, since they stole the patented inventions of Thomas Edison and used their money and influence to buy off or destroy their Gentile competition, all of which was infinitely more talented than they themselves were).

    The result? Most forms of high culture are in steep decline, and none of them will be recognizable in their historical forms by 2050, barring a worldwide cataclysm that involves the overthrow and re-ghettoization of these disciples of the power referred to in John's Gospel as the "prince of this world." Assuming, that is—and a huge assumption it is—that they don't destroy everything once precious to their enemies (guess who?) before their own eclipse. (Such things have happened many times before, after all.)

    No point in my going on, not with most folks here still being movie and TV watchers. Besides, the only jeremiads truly worth reading were written by Jeremias.

    Offline Napoli

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    Is Ballet sinful?
    « Reply #14 on: June 24, 2013, 03:56:32 PM »
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  • Good comments claudel.
    Regina Angelorum, ora pro nobis!


     

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