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Author Topic: How clear is your memory of childhood?  (Read 1123 times)

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Offline Carissima

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How clear is your memory of childhood?
« on: April 29, 2022, 12:35:23 AM »
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  • I have often wondered why my memories of being little are so sparse. 
    A moment or two from age 2-5, a few more from 8-12, several more 15 -18, but still not much stands out. Memories of daily life are practically non-existent, some years missing completely, and that has been as long as I can remember being an adult (I am in my 40’s now) 
    I never understood why it was this way, especially knowing that my 21 year old son has such a vivid memory of his childhood. He can recall the smallest details from some memories from age 2 and up. I watch my younger children growing up and wonder if they’ll remember daily life like their brother, or forget it all like me. 

    Funny I can remember the lyrics to old songs I listened to as a child, but time spent with friends and family I wish I had retained more of it. 

    I am wondering if there are others here willing to share their thoughts on, or experience with this?

    Have any of the Saints ever touched on this subject?


    Offline DigitalLogos

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #1 on: April 29, 2022, 01:14:55 AM »
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  • People have different capabilities for recollection. You just may not have such an aptitude, that's all. Nothing I would worry about, it can be a blessing and a curse.
    I personally have an extremely good memory, but it can also torment me given that I was not Catholic until I was 27, therefore, I can recollect many of the horrible sins I've committed in my past life vividly. Which Satan certainly uses to tempt me in thought very often. But also blesses me with an example of how not to act in my new life of grace.

    As for the Catholic understanding of memory, there's a whole section in the Catholic Encyclopedia on the subject, with distinctions between intellectual and sensible memory
    https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10174a.htm

    St. Thomas Aquinas and Augustine both extensively examined the idea of memory, with Augustine tending toward a more Platonic form of reminiscence.
    "The declared enemies of God and His Church, heretics and schismatics, must be criticized as much as possible, as long as truth is not denied. It is a work of charity to shout: ‘Here is the wolf!’ when it enters the flock or anywhere else." -- Saint Francis de Sales

    "For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears:" [2 Timothy 4:3]


    Online Nadir

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #2 on: April 29, 2022, 01:33:39 AM »
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  • I can remember specific events, but I would not be able to divide them into time blocks as you have. And I wouldn’t be able to date them. I think the earliest event which I can remember was when I was 3. 

    Whereas my husbands recall of events really amazes me, and I think that’s because he grew up in war time Italy, when the German’s took over and shared their home and patisserie. Later he also had some bad experiences, whereas I had none at all.

    He grew up in an unhappy home, whereas my home was a happy and holy place. 
    Help of Christians, guard our land from assault or inward stain,
    Let it be what God has planned, His new Eden where You reign.

    Offline 2Vermont

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #3 on: April 29, 2022, 04:44:11 AM »
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  • This is interesting.  In my experience, men remember a lot more from their past than women.    
    "For there is not any thing secret that shall not be made manifest, nor hidden, that shall not be known and come abroad."- Luke 8:17

    Offline Carissima

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #4 on: April 29, 2022, 06:49:34 AM »
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  • This is interesting.  In my experience, men remember a lot more from their past than women.   
    Interesting you say this, I have experienced the same. My husband remembers places we’ve visited together when we were younger, and I have no recollection we were even there. 
    I have an uncle with a photographic memory, and brother who also can remember the finest details of us growing up. 


    The women in my life who are mothers have a term they sometimes use to refer to themselves as having ‘mom brain’, because they forget so many important things in their day to day life concerning the management of the house and children’s activities. 


    Online bodeens

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #5 on: April 29, 2022, 10:56:12 AM »
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  • People have different capabilities for recollection. You just may not have such an aptitude, that's all. Nothing I would worry about, it can be a blessing and a curse.
    I personally have an extremely good memory, but it can also torment me given that I was not Catholic until I was 27, therefore, I can recollect many of the horrible sins I've committed in my past life vividly. Which Satan certainly uses to tempt me in thought very often. But also blesses me with an example of how not to act in my new life of grace.

    As for the Catholic understanding of memory, there's a whole section in the Catholic Encyclopedia on the subject, with distinctions between intellectual and sensible memory
    https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10174a.htm

    St. Thomas Aquinas and Augustine both extensively examined the idea of memory, with Augustine tending toward a more Platonic form of reminiscence.
    Something I think about constantly is that memory may not lie in the brain. There's stories of people with heart transplants and other organs that begin to remember things other people did. This tends towards a disembodied soul because what of the nature of those organs would give rise to memory? Egyptian pagans seemed to think memories lied in the heart.

    Likewise I have been graced with a great memory, which was very painful when I converted and continues to be a source of pain. My general took me about a month to put together and I'm still working on tracking various people down I need to make reparation to etc. I really have had to put a "lock" on my memory in certain periods of my life and just try my hardest to forget, of course I can't but it's the best I can do: not ever do things or think things that will "take me back" to that point in any sense. I suppose this has created some weird mental boundaries but they absolutely have to be there as safeguards.

    Only if having a good memory was still an employable skill!
    "We dare not even start to hope until the Faith, the true Faith, and its revealed content, are secured in our minds. Only in terms of Faith do we dare to hope."

    Online Ladislaus

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #6 on: April 29, 2022, 11:16:37 AM »
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  • Thankfully I don't have great recall when it comes to events, times, places, faces, names ... while, ironically having a brain like a steel trap for memorizing various academic details or strange things like phone numbers from 30 years ago.  I'd probably make a good confessor that way,  in that I would NEVER get people's names down (took me half the season coaching soccer with little kids to get their names right) and I would probably forget the confessed sins 5 seconds after walking out of the confessional.  So people wouldn't have to worry about, "Father would know it's me."

    But prayer and meditation help expunge the memories of past sins.  They'll fade more and more.  God forgives perfectly.  And when He forgives, He forgets.  And if God doesn't think of something, that thing doesn't exist and never existed.  That's just basic theology there.  Reason Our Lord died for past sins was to wipe them out completely, and re-create our natures ... unlike the bankrupt Prot notion where it's just a legal fiction that you're no longer "accountable" but it's still remembered, as if God is holding His nose to put up with you.  That should makes us that much more grateful for Our Lord's Passion and the Sacrament of Confession.  Those sins forgiven in the Sacrament have no existence anymore and we need to let them go.  Our Lord said those who look back are unworthy of Him.  He didn't go through all that so we would continue to be burdened by our sins, but to erase them completely.  We have to give Him more credit in terms of the power of His Passion and Death.  No sin can stand a chance against what He did.

    Offline Mithrandylan

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #7 on: April 29, 2022, 01:05:58 PM »
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  •  I would imagine part of the reason your 21 year old son has clearer memories of his childhood is the fact that there are more pictures and videos of it than there are of yours. I think about this with my own kids, who have (from a young age) been exposed to many more images and videos of themselves than I was. 




    "Be kind; do not seek the malicious satisfaction of having discovered an additional enemy to the Church... And, above all, be scrupulously truthful. To all, friends and foes alike, give that serious attention which does not misrepresent any opinion, does not distort any statement, does not mutilate any quotation. We need not fear to serve the cause of Christ less efficiently by putting on His spirit". (Vermeersch, 1913).


    Offline Miseremini

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #8 on: April 29, 2022, 03:46:37 PM »
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  • But prayer and meditation help expunge the memories of past sins.  They'll fade more and more.  God forgives perfectly.  And when He forgives, He forgets.  And if God doesn't think of something, that thing doesn't exist and never existed.  That's just basic theology there.  Reason Our Lord died for past sins was to wipe them out completely, and re-create our natures ... unlike the bankrupt Prot notion where it's just a legal fiction that you're no longer "accountable" but it's still remembered, as if God is holding His nose to put up with you.  That should makes us that much more grateful for Our Lord's Passion and the Sacrament of Confession.  Those sins forgiven in the Sacrament have no existence anymore and we need to let them go.  Our Lord said those who look back are unworthy of Him.  He didn't go through all that so we would continue to be burdened by our sins, but to erase them completely.  We have to give Him more credit in terms of the power of His Passion and Death.  No sin can stand a chance against what He did.
    So if God forgives and forgets does that mean that when we are judged we are only judged on the sins we die with?  Was St. Jean Vianney wrong when he wanted to go off and weep over his sins?
    So if we confess,receive Communion and Extreme Unction right before we die there will be nothing that God remembers on which to judge us.
    Great !  I thought everything was written down. 
    "Let God arise, and let His enemies be scattered: and them that hate Him flee from before His Holy Face"  Psalm 67:2[/b]


    Online Ladislaus

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #9 on: April 29, 2022, 05:48:30 PM »
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  • So if God forgives and forgets does that mean that when we are judged we are only judged on the sins we die with?  Was St. Jean Vianney wrong when he wanted to go off and weep over his sins?
    So if we confess,receive Communion and Extreme Unction right before we die there will be nothing that God remembers on which to judge us.
    Great !  I thought everything was written down.

    Absolutely, God completely forgets our sins.  Perfect forgiveness entails never having it come to mind ever again.  If someone grieviously offended me, and I "forgive," due to my imperfection, every time I see that person, I still think of what the person did even if I don't "hold a grudge".  But God's forgiveness is so perfect that when He sees you, He retains no memory of the wrongdoing.  These sins might as well have been committed by someone else, and in fact they were, since after Confession Our Lord "makes all things new".

    When we are judged at death, we are in fact only judged for the sins and the effects of sin that still remain in our souls, and any debts that remain as a result of our sins.  But the sin as sin no longer exists.  There was a time that there was a historical event where we did something, but that thing is no longer reckoned by God as sin, but just as a thing that happened.

    I don't believe for one second that during our judgment, God will accuse us of already-forgiven sins.  We will be evaluated based on the current state of our souls, and the review of our lives will entail seeing the mercy and grace of God, how they were present with us throughout everything.

    Our sins have effects and they have an impact.

    Take this example.  I sneak up in the dark with a mask on and punch someone in the face and break their nose.  That person doesn't know who I am.  But the next day I go visit him and see his broken nose.  So I am heart-broken by the sight of it, and I grieve at the pain being experienced by the person, and yet the person holds absolutely no grudge against me (not knowing that I did it).  Perhaps he even shakes my hand, gives me a hug, and thanks me for coming to visit him.  So you can still grieve for the effects of your sins, even if the other person holds zero grudge.  So God, after He forgives our sins, has the same disposition toward us as this person who holds absolutely no grudge, because He does completely forget the sin.  Similarly, we caused Our Lord incredible suffering due to our past sins, and we grieve for His suffering rather than, in a self-centered way, grieve over the harm that we had caused to ourselves.  So when a St John Vianney wept for his sins, it was with no thougtht to himself whatsoever, but 100% focused on the suffering of Our Lord.  Most of us, when we grieve for our sins, may have some sadness over the suffering we caused God, but a lot of it is rooted in self-pity, focusing on the harm we did to our own souls, and the blow that is to our own egos.

    Another analogy is that I accidentally smash into somenone's parked car.  It was a total accident.  So the person holds no grudge whatsoever.  That doesn't mean I didn't wreck his car.  So I owe him the cost of fixing it up.  Now, compare that with if I deliberately damaged the car.  That person then holds a grudge.  PLUS I owe him damages.  So, when God forgives a sin, He places the sin in the first category, where it's accidental damage and no longer remembers the sin part of it, that it was deliberate and malicious.

    So when we die, we may owe, in spiritual currency, thousands of dollars of damages, but if the sins have been forgiven in Confession, there's no recollection of any malice involved ... it's just a straight out objective debt.

    THAT is how perfect God's forgiveness is.  And the sin AS sin ceases to have any existence and no longer exists in His mind.  If something isn't in God's mind, it has no existence whatsoever.  Sin as historical event was known to have happened (just like with the car analogy, where in both cases the car was objectively damaged), but it's now in the same category as if had been accidental and without malice.

    We also must be purged of the imperfections and selfishness with which we die.

    If we only knew how perfectly God forgives and forgets, we would be overflowing with love and gratitude, for that complete and perfect forgiveness and re-creation which He purchased for us at such great cost.  Our Lord's Passsion absolutely destroyed all sin for those who received His forgiveness in the Sacraments.

    When we see someone, in our worthlessness, we might think, "oh, yeah, there's the guy who was a fornicator" or "that guy was a sodomite".  No such recollection occurs in God with us for the sins He has forgiven.

    God wished to free us entirely from the chains of sin, and we don't give enough credit to the power of His Passion and the perfection of His forgiveness ... since we are incapable of truly grasping it, until the next life.

    I think that people have an entirely mistaken view of how God will judge.  We have this false conception that He will rub our noses in our past sins.  See what you did there!  How about this!  That is to sell God infinitely short.  That's not forgiveness, is it?  If I say that I forgave an adulterous spouse, but then every time I get into an argument, I bring it back up, "you adulterous whore!" ... is that actually forgiveness?  Not at all.  God is not like that.  His forgiveness is perfect and the sin, as sin, will never be brought up or mentioned by Him again or thought of by Him again.

    We will be judged for our current state of soul and also need to make recompense for the damage we caused (as per the accidental vehicle damage), but God will not hold our forgiven sins against us.  But even these debts Our Lord will forgive to each of us to the extent that we forgive others.  If we hold our neighbors debts against them, then God will sent us over to the torturers until He has extracted every penny that we owe.  Notice, not forever, since the guilt of sin has been forgiven, but just until the debt itself has been paid.  And the debts of our sins are in the billions of dollars.  If we won't forgive the 50-cent debt owed to us by others, then God will extract every penny from us.  But if we forgive our neighbors all their debts, then God will forgive us up to the entire amount owed.

    Online Ladislaus

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #10 on: April 29, 2022, 05:56:33 PM »
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  • Exorcists have reported that the demons have no knowledge of any sins committed by those performing the exorcism if they have been forgiven in Confession.


    Offline DigitalLogos

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #11 on: April 29, 2022, 05:59:35 PM »
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  • Exorcists have reported that the demons have no knowledge of any sins committed by those performing the exorcism if they have been forgiven in Confession.
    That's interesting, as I thought +Ripperger said the opposite, specifically referencing porn, of which the demons can pull images to tempt.
    "The declared enemies of God and His Church, heretics and schismatics, must be criticized as much as possible, as long as truth is not denied. It is a work of charity to shout: ‘Here is the wolf!’ when it enters the flock or anywhere else." -- Saint Francis de Sales

    "For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears:" [2 Timothy 4:3]

    Online bodeens

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #12 on: April 29, 2022, 06:36:41 PM »
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  • Absolutely, God completely forgets our sins.  Perfect forgiveness entails never having it come to mind ever again.  If someone grieviously offended me, and I "forgive," due to my imperfection, every time I see that person, I still think of what the person did even if I don't "hold a grudge".  But God's forgiveness is so perfect that when He sees you, He retains no memory of the wrongdoing.  These sins might as well have been committed by someone else, and in fact they were, since after Confession Our Lord "makes all things new".

    When we are judged at death, we are in fact only judged for the sins and the effects of sin that still remain in our souls, and any debts that remain as a result of our sins.  But the sin as sin no longer exists.  There was a time that there was a historical event where we did something, but that thing is no longer reckoned by God as sin, but just as a thing that happened.

    I don't believe for one second that during our judgment, God will accuse us of already-forgiven sins.  We will be evaluated based on the current state of our souls, and the review of our lives will entail seeing the mercy and grace of God, how they were present with us throughout everything.

    Our sins have effects and they have an impact.

    Take this example.  I sneak up in the dark with a mask on and punch someone in the face and break their nose.  That person doesn't know who I am.  But the next day I go visit him and see his broken nose.  So I am heart-broken by the sight of it, and I grieve at the pain being experienced by the person, and yet the person holds absolutely no grudge against me (not knowing that I did it).  Perhaps he even shakes my hand, gives me a hug, and thanks me for coming to visit him.  So you can still grieve for the effects of your sins, even if the other person holds zero grudge.  So God, after He forgives our sins, has the same disposition toward us as this person who holds absolutely no grudge, because He does completely forget the sin.  Similarly, we caused Our Lord incredible suffering due to our past sins, and we grieve for His suffering rather than, in a self-centered way, grieve over the harm that we had caused to ourselves.  So when a St John Vianney wept for his sins, it was with no thougtht to himself whatsoever, but 100% focused on the suffering of Our Lord.  Most of us, when we grieve for our sins, may have some sadness over the suffering we caused God, but a lot of it is rooted in self-pity, focusing on the harm we did to our own souls, and the blow that is to our own egos.

    Another analogy is that I accidentally smash into somenone's parked car.  It was a total accident.  So the person holds no grudge whatsoever.  That doesn't mean I didn't wreck his car.  So I owe him the cost of fixing it up.  Now, compare that with if I deliberately damaged the car.  That person then holds a grudge.  PLUS I owe him damages.  So, when God forgives a sin, He places the sin in the first category, where it's accidental damage and no longer remembers the sin part of it, that it was deliberate and malicious.

    So when we die, we may owe, in spiritual currency, thousands of dollars of damages, but if the sins have been forgiven in Confession, there's no recollection of any malice involved ... it's just a straight out objective debt.

    THAT is how perfect God's forgiveness is.  And the sin AS sin ceases to have any existence and no longer exists in His mind.  If something isn't in God's mind, it has no existence whatsoever.  Sin as historical event was known to have happened (just like with the car analogy, where in both cases the car was objectively damaged), but it's now in the same category as if had been accidental and without malice.

    We also must be purged of the imperfections and selfishness with which we die.

    If we only knew how perfectly God forgives and forgets, we would be overflowing with love and gratitude, for that complete and perfect forgiveness and re-creation which He purchased for us at such great cost.  Our Lord's Passsion absolutely destroyed all sin for those who received His forgiveness in the Sacraments.

    When we see someone, in our worthlessness, we might think, "oh, yeah, there's the guy who was a fornicator" or "that guy was a sodomite".  No such recollection occurs in God with us for the sins He has forgiven.

    God wished to free us entirely from the chains of sin, and we don't give enough credit to the power of His Passion and the perfection of His forgiveness ... since we are incapable of truly grasping it, until the next life.

    I think that people have an entirely mistaken view of how God will judge.  We have this false conception that He will rub our noses in our past sins.  See what you did there!  How about this!  That is to sell God infinitely short.  That's not forgiveness, is it?  If I say that I forgave an adulterous spouse, but then every time I get into an argument, I bring it back up, "you adulterous whore!" ... is that actually forgiveness?  Not at all.  God is not like that.  His forgiveness is perfect and the sin, as sin, will never be brought up or mentioned by Him again or thought of by Him again.

    We will be judged for our current state of soul and also need to make recompense for the damage we caused (as per the accidental vehicle damage), but God will not hold our forgiven sins against us.  But even these debts Our Lord will forgive to each of us to the extent that we forgive others.  If we hold our neighbors debts against them, then God will sent us over to the torturers until He has extracted every penny that we owe.  Notice, not forever, since the guilt of sin has been forgiven, but just until the debt itself has been paid.  And the debts of our sins are in the billions of dollars.  If we won't forgive the 50-cent debt owed to us by others, then God will extract every penny from us.  But if we forgive our neighbors all their debts, then God will forgive us up to the entire amount owed.
    Fantastic post. As you said before, the opposite is a Protestant impulse, and definitely due to Forensic Justification, where the sin is imputed to our Lord (incompatible with any of the Church Father's understanding of sin), meaning that sin is never washed away (a Catholic idea), but instead in the imputation there is an exchange per se, in which the "Alien Righteousness" of Christ is applied at the particular judgment and weighed against our sins.

    It's easy to forget this level of mercy but it's good to see it crystallized like this. There is no forgiveness in Protestantism, in a strict (and actual) sense.
    "We dare not even start to hope until the Faith, the true Faith, and its revealed content, are secured in our minds. Only in terms of Faith do we dare to hope."

    Offline Miser Peccator

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #13 on: April 29, 2022, 06:58:43 PM »
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  • Absolutely, God completely forgets our sins.  Perfect forgiveness entails never having it come to mind ever again.  If someone grieviously offended me, and I "forgive," due to my imperfection, every time I see that person, I still think of what the person did even if I don't "hold a grudge".  But God's forgiveness is so perfect that when He sees you, He retains no memory of the wrongdoing.  These sins might as well have been committed by someone else, and in fact they were, since after Confession Our Lord "makes all things new".

    When we are judged at death, we are in fact only judged for the sins and the effects of sin that still remain in our souls, and any debts that remain as a result of our sins.  But the sin as sin no longer exists.  There was a time that there was a historical event where we did something, but that thing is no longer reckoned by God as sin, but just as a thing that happened.

    I don't believe for one second that during our judgment, God will accuse us of already-forgiven sins.  We will be evaluated based on the current state of our souls, and the review of our lives will entail seeing the mercy and grace of God, how they were present with us throughout everything.

    Our sins have effects and they have an impact.

    Take this example.  I sneak up in the dark with a mask on and punch someone in the face and break their nose.  That person doesn't know who I am.  But the next day I go visit him and see his broken nose.  So I am heart-broken by the sight of it, and I grieve at the pain being experienced by the person, and yet the person holds absolutely no grudge against me (not knowing that I did it).  Perhaps he even shakes my hand, gives me a hug, and thanks me for coming to visit him.  So you can still grieve for the effects of your sins, even if the other person holds zero grudge.  So God, after He forgives our sins, has the same disposition toward us as this person who holds absolutely no grudge, because He does completely forget the sin.  Similarly, we caused Our Lord incredible suffering due to our past sins, and we grieve for His suffering rather than, in a self-centered way, grieve over the harm that we had caused to ourselves.  So when a St John Vianney wept for his sins, it was with no thougtht to himself whatsoever, but 100% focused on the suffering of Our Lord.  Most of us, when we grieve for our sins, may have some sadness over the suffering we caused God, but a lot of it is rooted in self-pity, focusing on the harm we did to our own souls, and the blow that is to our own egos.

    Another analogy is that I accidentally smash into somenone's parked car.  It was a total accident.  So the person holds no grudge whatsoever.  That doesn't mean I didn't wreck his car.  So I owe him the cost of fixing it up.  Now, compare that with if I deliberately damaged the car.  That person then holds a grudge.  PLUS I owe him damages.  So, when God forgives a sin, He places the sin in the first category, where it's accidental damage and no longer remembers the sin part of it, that it was deliberate and malicious.

    So when we die, we may owe, in spiritual currency, thousands of dollars of damages, but if the sins have been forgiven in Confession, there's no recollection of any malice involved ... it's just a straight out objective debt.

    THAT is how perfect God's forgiveness is.  And the sin AS sin ceases to have any existence and no longer exists in His mind.  If something isn't in God's mind, it has no existence whatsoever.  Sin as historical event was known to have happened (just like with the car analogy, where in both cases the car was objectively damaged), but it's now in the same category as if had been accidental and without malice.

    We also must be purged of the imperfections and selfishness with which we die.

    If we only knew how perfectly God forgives and forgets, we would be overflowing with love and gratitude, for that complete and perfect forgiveness and re-creation which He purchased for us at such great cost.  Our Lord's Passsion absolutely destroyed all sin for those who received His forgiveness in the Sacraments.

    When we see someone, in our worthlessness, we might think, "oh, yeah, there's the guy who was a fornicator" or "that guy was a sodomite".  No such recollection occurs in God with us for the sins He has forgiven.

    God wished to free us entirely from the chains of sin, and we don't give enough credit to the power of His Passion and the perfection of His forgiveness ... since we are incapable of truly grasping it, until the next life.

    I think that people have an entirely mistaken view of how God will judge.  We have this false conception that He will rub our noses in our past sins.  See what you did there!  How about this!  That is to sell God infinitely short.  That's not forgiveness, is it?  If I say that I forgave an adulterous spouse, but then every time I get into an argument, I bring it back up, "you adulterous whore!" ... is that actually forgiveness?  Not at all.  God is not like that.  His forgiveness is perfect and the sin, as sin, will never be brought up or mentioned by Him again or thought of by Him again.

    We will be judged for our current state of soul and also need to make recompense for the damage we caused (as per the accidental vehicle damage), but God will not hold our forgiven sins against us.  But even these debts Our Lord will forgive to each of us to the extent that we forgive others.  If we hold our neighbors debts against them, then God will sent us over to the torturers until He has extracted every penny that we owe.  Notice, not forever, since the guilt of sin has been forgiven, but just until the debt itself has been paid.  And the debts of our sins are in the billions of dollars.  If we won't forgive the 50-cent debt owed to us by others, then God will extract every penny from us.  But if we forgive our neighbors all their debts, then God will forgive us up to the entire amount owed.


    Thanks for this!

    And what about plenary indulgence for the debt owed?

    Offline SolHero

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    Re: How clear is your memory of childhood?
    « Reply #14 on: April 29, 2022, 07:03:48 PM »
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  • This is interesting.  In my experience, men remember a lot more from their past than women.   
    In my experience, women remember their husband's past very better :laugh1: