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Traditional Catholic Faith => Catholic Living in the Modern World => Topic started by: Centroamerica on October 23, 2015, 04:34:05 AM

Title: Halloween
Post by: Centroamerica on October 23, 2015, 04:34:05 AM


I'm confused because culturally I never saw anything wrong with Halloween. It was a pretty big holiday when I was a kid. In Brazil it has a bad rap because in Portuguese it is called "the day of the witches" and it's looked down upon. My wife seems to be fully convinced that it is demonic.  I had to explain it a little at work...etc.  

Then I see articles like "Halloween is Catholic" etc.

Basically, I just want to see it from everyone's point of view to see if I form a different opinion.  
Title: Halloween
Post by: poche on October 23, 2015, 05:11:03 AM
The word "Halloween" means "All Hallows Eve" which is old English for the Vigil of All Saints Day which used to be listed on the calendar before the reform of Pope Pius XII in 1955.
So in answer to your question the answer is a resounding yes!!! Halloween is a very Catholic holiday.
 
Title: Halloween
Post by: Centroamerica on October 23, 2015, 05:29:59 AM
Quote from: poche
The word "Halloween" means "All Hallows Eve" which is old English for the Vigil of All Saints Day which used to be listed on the calendar before the reform of Pope Pius XII in 1955.
So in answer to your question the answer is a resounding yes!!! Halloween is a very Catholic holiday.
 



I've already explained that etymology to everyone and they say there's nothing wrong with that but in practice they disagree.  My family always dressed up and went trick or treating for Halloween and everyone I knew did, so all this is strange to me...
Title: Halloween
Post by: Patrick JK Gray on October 23, 2015, 06:57:43 AM
Quote from: Centroamerica


I'm confused because culturally I never saw anything wrong with Halloween. It was a pretty big holiday when I was a kid. In Brazil it has a bad rap because in Portuguese it is called "the day of the witches" and it's looked down upon. My wife seems to be fully convinced that it is demonic.  I had to explain it a little at work...etc.  

Then I see articles like "Halloween is Catholic" etc.

Basically, I just want to see it from everyone's point of view to see if I form a different opinion.  


The Feast of All Souls
As poche pointed out, the 31st of October is the Vigil of All Saints (Hallow means saint, coming from Middle English 'halwe', cf. German Heilige). All Saints (Nov. 1st) is the feast of the Church Triumphant in Heaven, All Souls (Nov 2nd) is the feast (if I may use the term) of the Church Suffering in Purgatory.

From the Catholic Encyclopedia : The Office of the Dead must be recited by the clergy and all the Masses are to be of Requiem, except one of the current feast, where this is of obligation.

Pope Benedict XV granted priests permission to offer three Masses on All Soul's Day.  One of these Masses the Celebrant may say according to his own intention; one must be offered for the faithful departed and the third for the intention of the Holy Father.

The Raccolta gives the immeasurable privilege of a plenary indulgence applicable only to the Holy Souls, toties quoties to all who devoutly visit a Benedictine Church or, if because of infirmity or distance, greater than a mile, you can't visit a Benedictine Church, wearing a blessed medal of St Benedict, visit any Church, from the Vespers of November 1st to sunset on November 2nd. I can see no reason why not to go in and out of the Church as often as ever you can. You could obtain many plenary indulgences on a single day.

The Raccolta itself gives the conditions:
https://archive.org/details/theraccoltaorcol00unknuoft

Customs
On the Continent [of Europe], the laudable-seeming custom of tidying up relatives' graves, bringing candles and flowers and saying prayers for the Dead is observed on Nov. 2nd. I can understand the Breton custom of washing the grave

Soul-cakes were once given to the poor as alms, the merit of the act being applied to the Souls in Purgatory.

The dressing up as demons, ghosts, witches  (I remember listening to an interesting tape by an elderly Jesuit who pointed out that a ghost may be one of two things -- a soul in Purgatory permitted to appear on Earth to ask for succour or else a demon. If it's malicious, then it's a demon as they're Holy Souls. The best thing to do is have a Mass said for it. If it's a holy soul, it will do it good. No demon wants a Mass said!) and so on, divination, horror stories, carved pumpkins and the rest of it strikes me as thoroughly pagan, glorifying the occult, and to be avoided. So, too, trick-or-treating, guising and the like.

The custom of souling, or going from door to door begging cakes in exchange for prayers for the dead, seems to have degenerated into trick-or-treating.

Summary

To my mind, avoid ''Halloween'' utterly. The disgusting parades of witches, murderers, demons and the like are in no sense Christian and have nothing to do with the Holy Souls. Take your children to church on All Souls Day to pray for the dead and above all to obtain the precious graces our Mother offers us for the dead.

I am not a priest, but it seems an open-and-shut case to me. A holy feast has degenerated into occultism, perhaps by connection with the pagan Samhain.

Title: Halloween
Post by: Centroamerica on October 23, 2015, 07:04:29 AM

The Church's use of gargoyles and skulls as a way of remembering the dead (novissimas memoranda) seems to rebut this.
Title: Halloween
Post by: TKGS on October 23, 2015, 07:05:18 AM
Halloween has its roots in the Catholic liturgical calendar.  It started out as being the vigil of All Saints Day.  

Is it, today, a Catholic holiday?  I can only answer for the celebration of Halloween in the United States.

In the United States, Halloween used to be a fairly benign celebration involving pranks, candy, etc.  My mother related what used to happen in her hometown in Iowa in the 1920s and 1930s.  The town's kids used to remove all the gates from the picket fences around the town and put them in nearby bushes and trees.  The next day (this is in a pretty much non-Catholic town and my mother was not a Catholic in her youth), the fathers would pick up the one or two gates on their property and take them to the town square where everyone would look for his gate and take it back home and put it back on the fence.  

Through the 1950s and 1960s, it transformed more into a day to dress up in haunting costumes and go "trick-of-treating" in which the pranks formerly done were now suspended because the homeowners would give candy to the kids.

This is still done, but it has taken on a very serious demonic and pagan aspect for a huge part of the population.  Halloween, as such, is certainly not a Catholic holiday anymore.  For many people, it is much more significant that even Christmas.  Retailers are certainly trying to make Halloween at least as big as Christmas to increase sales.
Title: Halloween
Post by: Centroamerica on October 23, 2015, 07:07:42 AM
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Title: Halloween
Post by: Patrick JK Gray on October 23, 2015, 07:17:37 AM
Sorry, some corrections: I can understand the Breton custom of washing the grave with holy water but the pouring of milk on the grave strikes me as a pagan abuse.

I'm inclined to say that the All Soul Day Customs are laudable, not merely laudable-seeming. I am rather scrupulous feared a vestige of paganism but I simply can't see it.

As to gargoyles and skulls, they are holy, laudable and good. The polish chapel is a good shock to the spiritual system, if I may say. Very edifying, as well as provoking compassion for the Holy Souls. I could also point to the ossuaries of the friars in Rome and Austria.

Remember, Man, that thou art dust, and unto dust thou shalt return is a holy thing to keep before our eyes. Hence the crosses on Ash Wednesday. It's an excellent preventative of sin to think that I may very well not get through today alive but may be before the judgement-seat of God.

However, excepting the old mystery-plays, which again have a devout purpose, I cannot see any reason that is good to be going around dressed as a demon, and never as a witch, Death, or so on. I don't believe for an instant that it makes people think of their last end and if it does, it tends rather to encourage debauchery (life is short) than holy fear. The connection with Samhain in the press, the tendency for debauched parties, the utter lack of reverence for the Holy Souls, all point to a pagan ceremony.

I fear I sound a little arrogant. I am most sorry,

God bless you.



Title: Halloween
Post by: poche on October 24, 2015, 01:18:24 AM
Quote from: Centroamerica
Quote from: poche
The word "Halloween" means "All Hallows Eve" which is old English for the Vigil of All Saints Day which used to be listed on the calendar before the reform of Pope Pius XII in 1955.
So in answer to your question the answer is a resounding yes!!! Halloween is a very Catholic holiday.
 



I've already explained that etymology to everyone and they say there's nothing wrong with that but in practice they disagree.  My family always dressed up and went trick or treating for Halloween and everyone I knew did, so all this is strange to me...


We dress the children up as saints.
Title: Halloween
Post by: OHCA on October 24, 2015, 03:39:50 AM
The villainization of Halloween is rooted in protestantism, largely for the very reason that Halloween is Catholic in origin.
Title: Halloween
Post by: Neil Obstat on October 24, 2015, 04:25:13 AM
.

I know a Catholic woman whose husband goes WHOLE HOG on Halloween, putting up elaborate remote-controlled displays of graves and coffins and haunted caves in his front yard where passers-by can walk around.  He has his control panel hidden in the bushes next to the driveway and he hides there peeking out between the bush branches to watch the startled reactions of people as they stand before any of the displays.  He waits for them to watch the ghouls on the ground or in the air, then he pulls a lever that sends air pressure through a hidden tube to the display, and the contraption leaps or twists or scampers.  The observers jump back, or scream, and the guy in the bushes giggles.  

He plans annual improvements for next Halloween's decorations all year long, buying parts and testing components.

(https://s15-us2.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2Faranamuerta.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2008%2F11%2Fhalloween-yard-shots-2008-147.jpg&sp=e6ce93b013430b86918b021e481f6987)

(https://s15-us2.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffaegoria.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F11%2FP1010972.jpg&sp=78c1cb0a24da809c35bc0bc5cbabe49b)

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Title: Halloween
Post by: Neil Obstat on October 24, 2015, 04:29:46 AM
.

Images reminiscent of Halloween costumes
in Los Angeles* (where Hollywood is)...

*the images below are not all from L.A., but are available worldwide on the Internet




Crack addicts, before and after
(could be before and after Halloween makeup):

(https://s16-us2.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com%2F-2ESfw-aTNZQ%2FT9yMVfrVsuI%2FAAAAAAAAA5I%2F9pryc9zEDR0%2Fs400%2FBefore_and_after_faces_of_meth.jpg&sp=dcba30837fec50a3911341b22a8fd139)

(https://s3-eu5.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http:%2F%2Fwww.eeew.net%2Fimages%2Fbefore-and-after-drugs-03.jpg&sp=03ddd34d24350c970ffe45330edc8cca)

(https://s17-us2.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2Fi.huffpost.com%2Fgen%2F893849%2Fthumbs%2Fo-METH-ADDICT-facebook.jpg&sp=1976e41a8d9a4020808a5a55f52d8743)

(https://s3-eu5.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2Fimg.thesun.co.uk%2Fmultimedia%2Farchive%2F01282%2FSNN3005JJ---682_1282403a.jpg&sp=dc8e1fc456b9609b42c3f95d82525b58)

(https://s3-eu5.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F-jJRpZeejAxM%2FUF24S-rT6DI%2FAAAAAAAAAhc%2FY-Q_GjzSHcs%2Fs1600%2FHeroinbeforeafter.jpg&sp=e7966c9698201f6f665f1736888d9145)

How many crack addicts would get caught up in crack to begin with if they could only know in advance what the addiction would do to their appearance?

These pictures can be helpful for us to think about what sin does to our souls.

.



Title: Halloween
Post by: Graham on October 29, 2015, 10:01:28 AM
By all means celebrate Halloween, but keep it Catholic. Visit a graveyard, pray for the dead. Let the kids dress up as saints and other historical figures, animals, benign mythological creatures, or even souls in Purgatory. Visit a farm that has a corn maze, hay rides, story-tellers, or other harvest-oriented amusements. (You can do your own research on local traditions.) But separate yourself from any tinge of gluttony and hedonism, child or teen misbehaviour, consumeristic Mammonism, and witchcraft or downright Satanism.
Title: Halloween
Post by: Matthew on October 29, 2015, 11:02:14 AM
Quote from: Graham
By all means celebrate Halloween, but keep it Catholic. Visit a graveyard, pray for the dead. Let the kids dress up as saints and other historical figures, animals, benign mythological creatures, or even souls in Purgatory. Visit a farm that has a corn maze, hay rides, story-tellers, or other harvest-oriented amusements. (You can do your own research on local traditions.) But separate yourself from any tinge of gluttony and hedonism, child or teen misbehaviour, consumeristic Mammonism, and witchcraft or downright Satanism.


This is my position as well.

Someone made a good point -- all the fundamentalist protestants that say "Halloween is evil" aren't inclined to hold back at all, considering that Halloween was formerly a Catholic holiday (All Hallows Eve). They don't believe in getting intercession from the Saints, they don't believe in praying for the Poor Souls, they don't believe in purgatory, etc.

Now joining in the trick-or-treating is problematic, because of what all they'll see on their trip -- the bad stuff (witches, satanism, horror, evil, vampires, etc.) as well as worldly spirit and immodest costumes.

I think Catholics should do SOMETHING on that day, so their kids don't feel left out of all the huge celebration. I agree that there's nothing wrong with spiders, skeletons (memento mori -- remember death), pumpkins, hay, hayrides, fall harvest theme, memento mori theme, or dressing up as saints/animals. Likewise, we should throw in some praying for the dead, and give the kids some kind of treats.

We Catholics have to recover the holiday a bit -- and basically MAKE UP some of our own new customs, since most of us don't have a ready template to copy from. My family just trick-or-treated when I was little.

Here is a good story to read your older kids:
http://www.chantcd.com/anne_soul_hell.htm
Title: Halloween
Post by: Cantarella on October 29, 2015, 11:39:36 AM
"Halloween, often feared by Evangelicals, is not the satanic celebration of evil it is sometimes portrayed to be. Catholics know this is a day to celebrate, not to frighten. In that vein, Catholic Christians often choose to dress as saints or other characters we admire, as well as poking a bit of fun at the devil. After all, he has already lost the battle; Jesus Christ the Savior was victorious when he became man and dwelt among us. He even allowed the devil to tempt him, as an illustration of the power of light over darkness......


The customs of Halloween are a mixture of Catholic popular devotions, and French, Irish, and English customs all mixed together.

•The custom of dressing up comes from the French.

•Carved Jack-o-lanterns come from the Irish, who originally carved turnips.

•English Catholics initiated the custom of begging from door to door, which was a purer form of “trick-or-treating.” Children would go door to door begging their neighbors for a “Soul Cake”. In turn, they would say a prayer for those neighbors’ dead saying,

•Customary foods for Halloween include cider, nuts, popcorn, and apples – and are best eaten around a fire.

• Bobbing for apples on Halloween is an old Celtic custom.

•Dressing up as a saint can be a springboard for learning about their lives and their special graces.

•Saint costumes provide an opportunity to teach others about those who loved God so much.

•Incorporating the wearing of costumes into a visit to a nursing home is an act of charity – bringing a bit of joy to the elderly and lonely."


http://www.catholicstand.com/halloween-dont-spooked-catholic/?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=socialnetwork

Title: Halloween
Post by: Cantarella on October 29, 2015, 11:41:31 AM
There are some great ideas for Halloween celebration in this blog:

Saintly Costumes

http://showerofroses.blogspot.com/2008/10/saintly-costumes.html
Title: Halloween
Post by: Cera on October 29, 2015, 02:16:00 PM
Quote from: Graham
By all means celebrate Halloween, but keep it Catholic. Visit a graveyard, pray for the dead. Let the kids dress up as saints and other historical figures, animals, benign mythological creatures, or even souls in Purgatory. Visit a farm that has a corn maze, hay rides, story-tellers, or other harvest-oriented amusements. (You can do your own research on local traditions.) But separate yourself from any tinge of gluttony and hedonism, child or teen misbehaviour, consumeristic Mammonism, and witchcraft or downright Satanism.


Great post -- thanks! I would add a p.s. Pray for those children born into families who worship the enemy and use the children in horrific rituals on that night.
Title: Halloween
Post by: Cera on October 29, 2015, 02:23:17 PM
Quote from: OHCA
The villainization of Halloween is rooted in protestantism, largely for the very reason that Halloween is Catholic in origin.


Not actually. Samhain or Halloween is pagan in origin. This is from the American Folklife Center. http://www.loc.gov/folklife/halloween.html


The Fantasy and Folklore of All Hallows
by Jack Santino

Halloween had its beginnings in an ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of the dead. The Celtic peoples, who were once found all over Europe, divided the year by four major holidays. According to their calendar, the year began on a day corresponding to November 1st on our present calendar. The date marked the beginning of winter. Since they were pastoral people, it was a time when cattle and sheep had to be moved to closer pastures and all livestock had to be secured for the winter months. Crops were harvested and stored. The date marked both an ending and a beginning in an eternal cycle.

The festival observed at this time was called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween). It was the biggest and most significant holiday of the Celtic year. The Celts believed that at the time of Samhain, more so than any other time of the year, the ghosts of the dead were able to mingle with the living, because at Samhain the souls of those who had died during the year traveled into the otherworld. People gathered to sacrifice animals, fruits, and vegetables. They also lit bonfires in honor of the dead, to aid them on their journey, and to keep them away from the living. On that day all manner of beings were abroad: ghosts, fairies, and demons--all part of the dark and dread.

Samhain became the Halloween we are familiar with when Christian missionaries attempted to change the religious practices of the Celtic people. In the early centuries of the first millennium A.D., before missionaries such as St. Patrick and St. Columcille converted them to Christianity, the Celts practiced an elaborate religion through their priestly caste, the Druids, who were priests, poets, scientists and scholars all at once. As religious leaders, ritual specialists, and bearers of learning, the Druids were not unlike the very missionaries and monks who were to Christianize their people and brand them evil devil worshippers.

As a result of their efforts to wipe out "pagan" holidays, such as Samhain, the Christians succeeded in effecting major transformations in it. In 601 A.D. Pope Gregory the First issued a now famous edict to his missionaries concerning the native beliefs and customs of the peoples he hoped to convert. Rather than try to obliterate native peoples' customs and beliefs, the pope instructed his missionaries to use them: if a group of people worshipped a tree, rather than cut it down, he advised them to consecrate it to Christ and allow its continued worship.

In terms of spreading Christianity, this was a brilliant concept and it became a basic approach used in Catholic missionary work. Church holy days were purposely set to coincide with native holy days. Christmas, for instance, was assigned the arbitrary date of December 25th because it corresponded with the mid-winter celebration of many peoples. Likewise, St. John's Day was set on the summer solstice.

Samhain, with its emphasis on the supernatural, was decidedly pagan. While missionaries identified their holy days with those observed by the Celts, they branded the earlier religion's supernatural deities as evil, and associated them with the devil. As representatives of the rival religion, Druids were considered evil worshippers of devilish or demonic gods and spirits. The Celtic underworld inevitably became identified with the Christian Hell.

The effects of this policy were to diminish but not totally eradicate the beliefs in the traditional gods. Celtic belief in supernatural creatures persisted, while the church made deliberate attempts to define them as being not merely dangerous, but malicious. Followers of the old religion went into hiding and were branded as witches.

The Christian feast of All Saints was assigned to November 1st. The day honored every Christian saint, especially those that did not otherwise have a special day devoted to them. This feast day was meant to substitute for Samhain, to draw the devotion of the Celtic peoples, and, finally, to replace it forever. That did not happen, but the traditional Celtic deities diminished in status, becoming fairies or leprechauns of more recent traditions.

The old beliefs associated with Samhain never died out entirely. The powerful symbolism of the traveling dead was too strong, and perhaps too basic to the human psyche, to be satisfied with the new, more abstract Catholic feast honoring saints. Recognizing that something that would subsume the original energy of Samhain was necessary, the church tried again to supplant it with a Christian feast day in the 9th century. This time it established November 2nd as All Souls Day--a day when the living prayed for the souls of all the dead. But, once again, the practice of retaining traditional customs while attempting to redefine them had a sustaining effect: the traditional beliefs and customs lived on, in new guises.

All Saints Day, otherwise known as All Hallows (hallowed means sanctified or holy), continued the ancient Celtic traditions. The evening prior to the day was the time of the most intense activity, both human and supernatural. People continued to celebrate All Hallows Eve as a time of the wandering dead, but the supernatural beings were now thought to be evil. The folk continued to propitiate those spirits (and their masked impersonators) by setting out gifts of food and drink. Subsequently, All Hallows Eve became Hallow Evening, which became Hallowe'en--an ancient Celtic, pre-Christian New Year's Day in contemporary dress.
Title: Halloween
Post by: TheRealMcCoy on October 29, 2015, 03:43:30 PM
And those who don't observe Halloween aren't less Catholic.  It's a personal choice based on your own family traditions and your ethnic identity.  We don't observe Halloween.  It's just not something we do.  
Title: Halloween
Post by: Matthew on October 29, 2015, 05:32:40 PM
Quote from: TheRealMcCoy
And those who don't observe Halloween aren't less Catholic.  It's a personal choice based on your own family traditions and your ethnic identity.  We don't observe Halloween.  It's just not something we do.  


Yes, definitely.

If ever something fit into the "in dubiis, libertas" (in doubtful things, liberty) it's the celebration (or non-celebration) of Halloween.

This is definitely an area where the Church has *not* ruled, and we are all left to do what we think is best.

And guess what? Whatever you think is best, you'll think is -- Best! For you and everyone else. But you can't impose your own views, opinions, and prudence upon another.

As long as you're not dressing up as devils, vampires, or immodest costumes, dabbling in the occult, or giving glory to satan in any other way, you're not committing sin.

Trick-or-treating is not sinful (though it is best avoided -- trick or treaters will encounter decorations/costumes that are decidedly NOT Catholic). Hanging a cardboard skeleton on your front door is not sinful. Carving a pumpkin isn't sinful. Eating a few pieces of candy is not sinful. Adults or children dressing up as various people, professions, animals, etc. is not sinful. Playing various (innocent) games is not sinful.

Just remember -- you dress up as what you want to be, or identify with in some way. Also: imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. So why dress up as a devil or vampire? Even as a child, I had no inclination to do so. I was a ninja the last few years until I turned 15 and was too old. When I was 11, I went as a copper penny, as I was into coin collecting at the time (I painted my face copper, and had my birthyear written in white on my cheek)

And then there are the clever costumes -- I remember in elementary school, one of the kids (whose parents were smart and/or rich) made a costume for him: He was a man in a cage, being carried by a gorilla. The gorilla's upper torso was empty, as well as the crossed legs of the kid inside the cage. But the overall effect was quite impressive!
Title: Halloween
Post by: RomanCatholic1953 on October 29, 2015, 07:05:59 PM
The Mexicans have their 'Day of the Dead' in which they walk around
in costumes.

Halloween is my Mother's Birthday. She is out of town.
 
I will stay indoors all night Halloween and will not open the door until
All Saints Day.  
Title: Halloween
Post by: CathMomof7 on October 30, 2015, 02:38:24 PM
As Americans, a great many of us have sentimental attachments to celebrating Halloween, whether you were Catholic or Protestant.  But as traditional Catholics today, I think we owe our children by teaching them the truth.  American Catholics, I fear, don't really know the truth about Halloween because the true, pious celebrations of this Holy Day are not part of our culture.  

The Protestant Puritans absolutely did not bring any customs of any kind whatsoever.  The only place in Colonial American where All Hallow's Eve was even tolerated was Maryland.  In 1785, there were only 25,000 Catholics in the entire Colonies, less than 1% of the population!  So imagine, one of the 25 priests in the entire country leading a procession of 10 Catholics (probably just one family or 2 maybe) down the street to the cemetery with candles and saying prayers.  What a weird and freaky sight for the Protestants!

As the immigrants slowly began coming in, they brought the traditions from their own countries.  But the Protestants were also surrounded in most places by the Natives, who had some rather peculiar rituals, namely rituals associated with corn.  Here in the NE, corn is ready in late summer and early fall.  We still have a great many dry corn fields right now.  The corn festivals lasted for several days and included dances, games, naming babies, and make offerings to the Great Spirits with bonfires and burning of the corn husks.  The Protestants absolutely had to get along with the Indians are risk starving or being attacked, but the Catholic immigrants were too small in number to really be a bother.  

By the early 1800s, there were more Harvest festivals than Hallow'een processionals.  

However, as the cities grew in the mid 1840s due to industrialization and massive Catholic immigration, the situation changed a lot.  As large communities of Catholics grew in the major NE cities, so did the prejudices.  Instead of 10 Catholics walking with the priest to the cemetery, you had HUGE parties that covered city blocks of Catholics walking down to Mass on Hallow'een going in the front door, and coming out the back door.  You had 5 or 10 priests walking through the cemeteries and streets saying prayers.  Families, who lived close together, walked from home to home, with food and candles saying prayers with each other and sharing in their own rituals.  Too many Catholics for the Protestants to deal with.  And thus began the Hallow'een night of pranks and tricks.  

By the turn of the century, pranks and tricks were the norm and the night was feared by local farmers and business owners across the country.  The natives had mostly been assimilated or moved to the reservations.  The Catholics lived in the cities and the kids threw garbage at their houses.  They turned over outhouses and cows.  

By the 1920s as the cities were becoming so congested the only solution seemed to be festivals at the schools.  It worked.  Even the Catholics went along with this idea because the festivities allowed them to practice their rituals and prayers in peace.  It also gave them an opportunity to assimilate.

By the 1940s Halloween in the U.S became a marketable day with costumes and candy.

Perhaps it was "harmless" when we were kids, but Halloween as we know it was culturally a mishmosh of ideas and cultures, and the "true" meaning of the celebration was long lost to American Catholics.

That is the truth.  

Should we celebrate Halloween?  Not like the American's do.  Since we have smaller and smaller Catholic circles we are probably resigned to creating our own rituals based on pious traditions either from our own ancestry or ones we introduce ourselves.

We are isolated from any trads.  So instead, we have a party at home for our kids where we play games, sing songs, eat candy and pizza.  The children look forward to it.  Our neighborhood has a little craft festival which we go to to get roasted corn and other treats.  Sometimes we do a hayride.  After the fun, though, we prepare our altar with candles and photos of the family members who have passed in the Faith.  We say a Rosary for their souls.  The following morning we go to Mass.  Usually, after Mass we go over to the Catholic cemetery and try to clean the debris while we say our Rosary.

As American Catholic's we must realize that our Halloween celebration is an adulterated celebration.  European Catholics, South American Catholics, African Catholics, do not celebrate in this way.  

IMO, we should avoid the habit of being Catholic Americans.  



Title: Halloween
Post by: RomanCatholic1953 on October 30, 2015, 07:51:24 PM
Halloween is just another day that the stores make money.
At a recent visit to my local Walmart. They are not doing well in
selling Halloween costumes, face paints, and candies.
They plan to lower their prices on Halloween Black Saturday.  
I suggest avoid any shopping this Saturday anywhere
Halloween supplies are available.
Title: Halloween
Post by: Christopher67 on October 30, 2015, 10:41:19 PM
......and then there is this idiotic prot....

http://www.omegashock.com/2015/10/30/samhain-and-dangerous-evil/
Title: Halloween
Post by: Traditional Guy 20 on October 30, 2015, 10:51:20 PM
I agree with what everyone is saying here in that All Hallow's Eve is not itself evil but that if it follows the norms of today's Halloween it can become very bad indeed (especially the candy which can ruin a kid's teeth). I agree that Catholics should pray for the dead and I also have no problem with showing a kid specials about Halloween but I myself would never rot my kids' teeth out with candy or get them all dressed up with that gothic vampire vamp they have going on now (though I admit black is my favorite color. ;P)
Title: Halloween
Post by: SERE on October 31, 2015, 09:22:03 AM
Halloween is now a demonic slut fest and a gathering of male [jerks] at pub crawls, parties and other social events celebrating this day.