Author Topic: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)  (Read 859 times)

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Offline Nadir

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Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
« on: May 01, 2019, 03:02:20 AM »
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  • Does anyone know who is this priest? A wonderful speaker and a rundown on the history of so much evil in the world in just 16 minutes.




    [color=var(--yt-spec-text-primary)]Pope Pius XII's Institution of the Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    Sermon from 2005 on why was this feast day created.  What is significant of the day May 1st?  What is May Day? Why was this chosen to be the feast day?  What were the plans of the Illuminati? Have they been successful?  This is a call to all men to "Esto Vir!" (Be a Man!)  For more please go to http://www.audiosancto.org & say 3 Hail Marys for the priest please.

    Go, then to Joseph, and do all that he shall say to you;
    Go to Joseph, and obey him as Jesus and Mary obeyed him;
    Go to Joseph, and speak to him as they spoke to him;
    Go to Joseph, and consult him as they consulted him;
    Go to Joseph, and honour him as they honoured him;
    Go to Joseph, and be grateful to him as they were grateful to him;
    Go to Joseph, and love him, as they love him still.
     
    - St. Alphonsus Liguori -
    [/size]
    [/font][/size][/color]

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #1 on: May 01, 2019, 03:43:00 AM »
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  • Another questionable act of Pius XII, instituting this feast on Communist “May Day” (the high holy day of communists).

    He sought to speak highly of labor, to win their sympathies.

    Today, the breviary speaks of labor being sanctified (not of us sanctifying our labors, but as though labor already  possessed this intrinsic quality):

    Labor is holy?

    That would be a very grave error.


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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #2 on: May 01, 2019, 04:09:18 AM »
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  • Another questionable act of Pius XII, instituting this feast on Communist “May Day” (the high holy day of communists).

    He sought to speak highly of labor, to win their sympathies.

    Today, the breviary speaks of labor being sanctified (not of us sanctifying our labors, but as though labor already  possessed this intrinsic quality):

    Labor is holy?

    That would be a very grave error.

    Info on the feast here:

    https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2019-05-01

    Old Calendar: St. Joseph the Worker; St. Peregrine, priest & religious (Hist)
    The feast of St. Joseph the Worker was established by Pope Pius XII in 1955 in order to Christianize the concept of labor and give to all workmen a model and a protector. By the daily labor in his shop, offered to God with patience and joy, St. Joseph provided for the necessities of his holy spouse and of the Incarnate Son of God, and thus became an example to all laborers. "Workmen and all those laboring in conditions of poverty will have reasons to rejoice rather than grieve, since they have in common with the Holy Family daily preoccupations and cares"(Leo XIII).


    St. Joseph the Worker
    "May Day" has long been dedicated to labor and the working man. It falls on the first day of the month that is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Pope Pius XII expressed the hope that this feast would accentuate the dignity of labor and would bring a spiritual dimension to labor unions. It is eminently fitting that St. Joseph, a working man who became the foster-father of Christ and patron of the universal Church, should be honored on this day.

    The texts of the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours provide a catechetical synthesis of the significance of human labor seen in the light of faith. The Opening Prayer states that God, the creator and ruler of the universe, has called men and women in every age to develop and use their talents for the good of others. The Office of Readings, taken from the document of the Second Vatican Council on the Church in the modern world, develops this idea. In every type of labor we are obeying the command of God given in Genesis 2:15 and repeated in the responsory for the Office of Readings. The responsory for the Canticle of Zechariah says that "St. Joseph faithfully practiced the carpenter's trade. He is a shining example for all workers." Then, in the second part of the Opening Prayer, we ask that we may do the work that God has asked of us and come to the rewards he has promised. In the Prayer after Communion we ask: "May our lives manifest your love; may we rejoice for ever in your peace."
    The liturgy for this feast vindicates the right to work, and this is a message that needs to be heard and heeded in our modern society. In many of the documents issued by Pope John XXIII, Pope Paul VI, the Second Vatican Council and Pope John Paul II, reference is made to the Christian spirit that should permeate one's work, after the example of St. Joseph. In addition to this, there is a special dignity and value to the work done in caring for the family. The Office of Readings contains an excerpt from the Vatican II document on the modern world: "Where men and women, in the course of gaining a livelihood for themselves and their families, offer appropriate service to society, they can be confident that their personal efforts promote the work of the Creator, confer benefits on their fellowmen, and help to realize God's plan in history" (no. 34).
    — Excerpted from Saints of the Roman Calendar by Enzo Lodi

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #3 on: May 01, 2019, 04:42:27 AM »
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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #4 on: May 01, 2019, 04:54:57 AM »
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  • An example of why instituting a feast exalting the "dignity" of labor might be imprudent: Dorothy day conflating communism and Catholicism:

    https://catholiceye.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/dorothy-day-a-communist/


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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #5 on: May 01, 2019, 05:19:42 AM »
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  • From an article by Fr. Cekada: http://www.traditionalmass.org/articles/article.php?id=37&catname=6

    [Because of the confusing format and use of quotation marks, it is not clear to me whether he is citing Fr. Didier Bonneterre SSPX, author of Liturgical Revolution, or Jean Crete]:

    "The Sacred Congregation of Rites was not favorable toward this decree, the work of a special commission. When, five weeks later, Pius XII announced the feast of St. Joseph the Worker (which caused the ancient feast of Ss. Philip and James to be transferred, and which replaced the Solemnity of St Joseph, Patron of the Church), there was open opposition to it.

    “For more than a year the Sacred Congregation of Rites refused to compose the office and Mass for the new feast. Many interventions of the pope were necessary before the Congregation of Rites agreed, against their will, to publish the office in 1956 — an office so badly composed that one might suspect it had been deliberately sabotaged. And it was only in 1960 that the melodies of the Mass and office were composed — melodies based on models of the worst taste.

    "We relate this little-known episode to give an idea of the violence of the reaction to the first liturgical reforms of Pius XII".

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #6 on: May 01, 2019, 05:31:42 AM »
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  • Jean Crete: https://cappellagregoriana.wordpress.com/tag/saint-joseph-the-worker/#_edn1

    In its 46th meeting on 22 October 1954, Cardinal Cicognani read a letter from the Pro-Secretary Mons. Montini communicating to the Commission the Holy Father’s desire to fix the date of the Queenship of Mary to 22 August, transferring the Immaculate Heart of Mary to 31 May [19]. This, however, did not materialise, and the two feasts retained their dates (to be switched later by Paul VI), with the propers of the Queenship of Mary promulgated by decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites, dated 31 May 1955 [20].

    In the meantime, the Holy Father articulated his determination to assign the feast of Saint Joseph the Woker to 1 May on 1 May 1955, towards the end of his speech to members of the Associazioni Cristiane Lavoratori Italiani (ACLI) [21]. He called it the feast of San Giuseppe Artigiano (the same terminology used by the Commission, first Latinised as Sanctus Ioseph Operarius, later changed to Sanctus Ioseph Opifex a year after). That the Pope’s determination stemmed from a desire to Christianise a communist observance doubtless obtains clarity in his own words [22]:
    […] accepted by Christian workers, and as though receiving the Christian chrism, 1 May, far from being a reawakening of discord, hatred and violence, it is and will be a recurring invitation to modern society to fulfill what is still lacking from social peace.
    […] accolto dai lavoratori cristiani, e quasi ricevendo il crisma cristiano, il 1° maggio, ben lungi dall’essere risveglio di discordie, di odio e di violenza, è e sarà un ricorrente invito alla moderna società per compiere ciò che ancora manca alla pace sociale.
    In the Commission’s subsequent 51st meeting on 24 June 1955, the last meeting for the period 1954–1955, Father Antonelli informed the Commission that amongst their calendared agenda for the next period would be the examination of the Office and Mass of Saint Joseph the Worker [23]. This began in their next meeting on 7 October 1955, scrutinising the schema prepared by Father Löw with the help of Father Antonelli, which had been distributed to the members beforehand [24].
    In the 59th meeting on 17 January 1956, the Commission continued the examination of the Office and Mass of Saint Joseph the Worker, fixing parts and modifying others, admitting new compositions, assigning new pericopes [25]. Refining the work further, in the 62nd meeting on 6 April 1956, the Commission reviewed the Office and Mass of Saint Joseph the Worker in order to root out those parts that emphasised manual labour, changing pericopes, substituting responsories, and recomposing the lessons of the second nocturn according to the speech of the Holy Father to the ACLI the previous year [26].


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    Eight days later, on 14 April 1956, the Sacred Congregation of Rites finally announced by decree the institution of the new feast, prescribing for it the highest liturgical rank, perpetually transferring the feast of Saint Philip and Saint James to 11 May, and abolishing the Solemnity of Saint Joseph (what was for a long time known in the Philippines as the Patronazgo del Glorioso Señor San José), reappointing the epithet Patron of the Universal Church to the new feast [27]. In his speech that year to the ACLI, after the first celebration of the new feast in the Vatican, Pius XII announced [28]:
    With the effusion of a Father and with the authority of a Supreme Shepherd, We not only welcomed your just desire, but, as a gift withdrawn from the heavenly treasures, We also instituted the liturgical feast of your patron, Saint Joseph, the virginal husband of Mary, the humble, the silent, the just labourer of Nazareth, so that in the future, your special Protector before God, your safeguard in life, may become your guardian and defender in the travails and trials of labour.
    Con effusione di Padre e con l’autorità di supremo Pastore non solo accogliemmo il vostro giusto desiderio, ma, come dono attinto dai tesori celesti, istituimmo la festa liturgica del vostro Patrono S. Giuseppe, lo sposo verginale di Maria, l’umile, il silenzioso, il giusto lavoratore di Nazareth, affinchè fosse in avvenire il vostro speciale Protettore presso Dio, il vostro palladio nella vita, a tutela e a difesa nei travagli e nei cimenti del lavoro.
    At least in terms of the liturgical texts, the existence of the feast of Saint Joseph the Worker was by this time sealed.

    Appendix to the 2001 Nocturnale Romanum containing the proper chants for the Matins of Saint Joseph the Worker, correctly attributing authorship of the hymn to Father Evaristo d’Anversa (together with Father Vittorio Genovesi, S. J., was hymnographer for the Sacred Congregation of Rites from the reign of Pius XI). The date 1968 does not refer to the year of the composition; it refers to the year Father d’Anversa died. As of January 1956, the two hymns Te, pater Ioseph and Aurora solis nuntia were already existent.

    There appears to have been a blueprint materialising in the innovative minds of the reformers of that time, and to its consequences we are now heirs. When it comes to weighing Pope Pius XII’s actual contribution to the beginnings of the liturgical reforms, there are at least two tendencies: one, the Holy Father desired, directed, approved, and sanctioned the radical changes that came out of the Commission; another, that certain personalities in the Commission duped the Holy Father into authorising the obscene mutilations visited upon the Liturgy. Father Bonneterre, however, proposes a third tendency: The Holy Father encouraged the reform without fully grasping its consequences, as there was no way of predicting its outcomes in the first place. In his own words [29]:
    Thus, with the purest of intentions, Pius XII undertook reforms that were required by the good of souls, but without realising, as would have been impossible, that he was thereby undermining the foundations of the Church’s liturgy and discipline at one of the most critical moments in their history, and, above all, without being aware that he was putting into practice the program of the deviated Liturgical Movement.
    Pie XII a donc entrepris, en toute pureté d’intention, des réformes exigées par les besoins des âmes, sans se rendre compte—et il ne le pouvait pas—qu’il ébranlait la liturgie et la discipline à une des périodes les plus critiques de leur histoire, et surtout sans réaliser qu’il mettait en pratique le programme du « Mouvement liturgique » dévoyé.
    The good abbé then suggests that it would be an exercise in injustice and frustration to paint the Holy Father unorthodox merely by what he had caused to be carried out. And we concur. Explaining away the mild irony liaising orthodoxy with auto-demolition often seek after plausible reasons, such as age-mediated facultative impairment or time-aided physical debilitation. We think, however, that we must be allowed to feel that sensation of sorrow typically following the discovery that we have been somehow cheated of our own inheritance. Liturgical, for that matter. Fr. Bonneterre continues [30]:
    In concluding this brief study of the liturgical reforms of Pope Pius XII, it is our duty to remind the reader of their perfect orthodoxy, guaranteed by that of the Pope who promulgated them; but we must also recognise that, in retrospect, for the reasons given above, they constitute the first stages of the “auto-demolition” of the Roman liturgy.


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    Pour conclure cette trop rapide étude des réformes liturgiques du Pape Pie XII, nous avons le devoir de rappeler leur parfaite orthodoxie, garantie par celle de celui qui les a promulguées, mais il nous faut reconnaître aussi qu’elles constituent, pour les raisons que nous avons expliquées, les premières étapes de « l’autodémolition » de la liturgie romaine.
    Let us ask Saint Joseph in these trying times, to guide all of us who look upon him as our champion and the protector of Holy Mother Church, that we may offer our travails, our labours, our sorrows, for the preservation of the Holy Catholic Faith.
    Ut in omnibus laudetur Dominus.

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #7 on: May 01, 2019, 05:35:02 AM »
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  • TAG: SAINT JOSEPH THE WORKER





    Previous part 1: Chant-hunt in the books

    Previous part 2: Timeline of the institution





    It is often said that history is written by the victors. Our previous post detailing the minutes of the meetings of the Commission for the General Reform of the Liturgy discussing what to be done with 1 May leaves no room for what the attenders felt about what they were discussing. One must note that the authors and personalities quoted were sympathetic to the liturgical reform. Father Carlo Braga is a known collaborator of Archbishop Annibale Bugnini. Cardinal Ferdinando Giuseppe Antonelli, O. F. M., on the other hand, whose point of view Father Nicola Giampietro, O. F. M. Cap. explored in his book, was relator general of the Sacred Congregation of Rites at the time of the meetings on Saint Joseph, later secretary to the committee entrusted with the implementation of the reforms of Sacrosanctum Concilium. Contemporary authors obviating bias oftentimes come across sounding like an accommodating triage nurse summoning the next patient through the hospital intercom. For that, we may remain in the dark about what many of them actually felt before, during, and after the changes.

    If the feast was established in 1955, and the new propers were released in 1956, why then does the 1957 liturgical book for the choir not contain the melodies? The simple answer would be this: The Sacred Congregation of Rites did not like the new feast. The Pope himself needed to intervene in order to force the Congregation to publish the Office and Mass of the new feast in 1956. It would take four more years for the Congregation to finally set the new propers to chant. The diary of Cardinal Antonelli simply presents the facts chronologically, meticulously cataloguing each and every item tackled and treated, every problem discussed and resolved, every solution proposed and approved, every reflection contemplated and considered, even presenting everyone as cooperating to achieve the goal of the task placed in their charge, enough for us to somehow conclude that nothing but the sheer bulk of the work caused the delay. From the clinical emotion-agnostic realm of meeting minutes, let us shift to that more sensational and thought-provoking province of popular reaction. We will let Fr. Jean Crété’s testimony [1] speak for itself for précising his account might reduce its power:


    Fr. [Didier] Bonneterre recognises that this decree signaled the beginning of the subversion of the liturgy, and yet seeks to excuse Pius XII on the grounds that most people, except those who were party to the subversion, are thought of today as having been ignorant as to what was going on. I can, on the contrary, give a categorical testimony on this point. I realized very well that Pius XII’s decrees were just the beginning of a total subversion of the liturgy, and I was not the only one. All the true liturgists, all the priests who were attached to tradition, were dismayed. The Sacred Congregation of Rites was not favorable toward the proposed innovations, which were the special work of a modernising commission. When, five weeks later, Pius XII announced the feast of St. Joseph the Worker, which caused the ancient feast of SS. Philip and James to be transferred, and which replaced the Solemnity of S. Joseph, Patron of the Church, there was open opposition to it. For more than a year the Sacred Congregation of Rites refused to compose the Office and Mass for the new feast. Many interventions of agents purporting to represent the pope were necessary before the Congregation of Rites agreed, against their will, to publish the Office in 1956—an Office so badly composed that one might suspect it had been deliberately sabotaged. And it was only in 1960 that the melodies of the Mass and office were composed—melodies based on models of the worst taste. I relate this little-known episode to give an idea of the violence of the reaction to the first liturgical reforms of Pius XII.


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    [size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}][size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}]Hopefully, at this point, the reason is now clear.[/font][/size][/font][/size]




    Left to right, up: (1) Start of the entry of the feasts of May in the 1957 Liber usualis, two years after the feast was established, and one year after the new propers were approved, showing omission of the new feast of Saint Joseph the Worker; (2) entry for 1 May in the 2015 Ordo Divini Officii published by the PCED, indicating that for the Mass of Saint Joseph the Work, the Mass Adiutor of the suppressed Solemnity of Saint Joseph may be used; (3) photocopy of the appendix to the 1964 Liber usualis containing the propers of Saint Joseph the Worker set to chant, with imprimatur dated 1 April 1961.



    There appears to have been a blueprint materialising in the innovative minds of the reformers of that time, and to its consequences we are now heirs. If we leave out the feminist undertone, appropriating Mrs. Lintott’s take on the meaning of history for ourselves becomes too irresistible: “History is a commentary on the various and continuing incapabilities of men” [2]. In our case, it’s “men of the cloth”. Nothing is perhaps more damning to a once-in-vogue worldview than when the judgment of history reaffirms the wisdom of tradition: From the highest of the three liturgical ranks (first class) in the 1962 Missal, the new feast descended to the lowest of four (optional memorial) in the 1970 Missal. Let us ask Saint Joseph in these trying times, to guide all of us who look upon him as our champion and the protector of Holy Mother Church, that we may offer our travails, our labours, our sorrows, for the preservation of the Holy Catholic Faith.

    Ut in omnibus laudetur Dominus.


    [size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}][size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}]
    [1] Jean Crété, Le mouvement liturgique: Itinéraire (January 1981) p. 133.
    [2] Mrs Dorothy Lintott (Frances de la Tour) in The history boys, dir. Nicholas Hytner (Fox Searchlight Pictures: 2006).[/font][/size][/font][/size]


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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #8 on: May 01, 2019, 07:05:45 AM »
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  • From the neo-con/modernist Homiletic and Pastoral Review
    https://www.hprweb.com/2017/05/on-the-significance-of-the-feast-of-saint-joseph-the-worker/

    On the Significance of the Feast of Saint Joseph the Worker
    MAY 16, 2017 BY MARIA CINTORINO
    Holy Family, Father and Son by Corbert Gauthier (2002)

    In 1955, Pope Pius XII instituted May 1 to be the Feast of Saint Joseph the Worker. This feast, which perhaps intentionally coincided with “May Day” and “International Workers Day,” seeks to remind us of the spiritual dimension of man’s daily work. In holding Saint Joseph as the patron saint of workers, and in establishing this feast day, the Church reminds the world of the sacredness of man’s labors, and of his dignity in the workplace.
    Ever since the beginning of his creation, man’s dignity has been inherently linked to his work. Genesis 2:5 relates that before the creation of human beings, “there was not a man to till the earth.” After Adam’s creation, God places the first man in the Garden of Paradise. In so doing, God specifically intends Adam to care for creation: “The Lord God took the man, and put him in the Garden of Eden, to till and keep it” (Genesis 2:5). God then charges Adam to subdue the earth, giving him charge over creation, and those in it.
    Adam’s first task in the Garden was to name the animals:
    Quote
    Quote …so out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called every living creature, that was its name (Genesis 2:19).

    Just as God names Adam, Adam names the animals, which are entrusted to his care. In so doing, Adam accepts his role as steward of the earth, and asserts his authority over creation.
    By entrusting creation to man, and giving him the responsibility to subdue the earth, exercising dominion over it, God affirms man’s dignity. God allows man to participate in His role as creator. Man then becomes a co-creator with God, for he shares in God’s eternal creative act through his work of caring for this new creation. Adam, while collaborating with God in caring for the earth, has been given the responsibility of being the steward of creation. In this way, God further distances humanity from the animals, for man finds dignity through work. Out of all creation, only man is capable of work, and only man is called to work. In the Garden, Adam realizes the importance of his calling, and views his labors as a blessing, for he shares in God’s creative power.
    After the fall, the saving work of the Garden becomes burdensome to man. Once viewed as a blessing and a sharing in God’s eternal act of creating, and as an activity to be enjoyed, now becomes an object of pain and toil. The earth, now cursed because of Adam, no longer harmonizes with man:
    Quote
    Quote …in toil, you shall eat of it, all the days of your life; thorns and thistles it shall bring forth to you; and you shall eat the plants of the field. In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread till you return to the ground (Genesis 3:17-19).

    Man’s responsibility of stewardship becomes more difficult, and his role and duties as provider more challenging. The earth’s elements, once in perfect harmony with man, react against Adam, presenting obstacles to his work by means of natural disasters. Because his affects (feelings and emotions) are disordered, man no longer sees the beauty of his call to work, and experiences the difficulties and stress, whether physical or mental, which his labors bring. In this way, man lives out his days until he returns to the dust from which he came.
    That man experiences the hardships of work by the sweat of his brow does not, nonetheless, minimize the dignity of his task, nor that work is a good thing for man. Work truly is a good for human beings—our wounded natures, disordered affections and appetites, and associations of work with the pain it sometimes brings, make it harder for us to see why it is a good. Saint John Paul II reflects on the goodness of human labors, saying that:
    Quote
    Quote …work is a good thing for man—a good thing for humanity—because through work man not only transforms nature, adopting it to his needs, but he also achieves fulfillment as a human being and indeed, in a sense, becomes “more a human being.”1

    Humanity finds fulfillment in work because just as the creation of the world was ordered to benefit all humankind, the world was intended to help sanctify human beings in their care of creation. When man collaborates with God in dignified work, man becomes transformed for he achieves fulfillment in his role as co-creator, and becomes sanctified by offering to God the fruit of his labors. Through his work, man mirrors the creative act of God in the world, ensuring that creation is ordered to the good, and to the service of his neighbors.
    Work is a good because it’s ultimate aim is to give glory and praise to God. In fact, Saint Ignatius of Loyola says that man was “created to praise, reverence, and serve God.”

    By caring for creation, man leads all of the world in praise to God. In Laborem Exercens, Saint John Paul II reflects that:
    Quote
    Quote …man, created to God’s image, received a mandate to subject to himself the earth and all that it contains, and to govern the world with justice and holiness; a mandate to relate himself, and the totality of things, to him who was to be acknowledged as the Lord and Creator of all. Thus, by subjection of all things to man, the name of God would be wonderful in all the earth.2

    Man achieves this mandate principally through his work, for by caring for creation, and subsequently all those in it, man leads all of the earth in a harmonious song of praise to God.
    The end of all man’s activities—praising God—invites humanity to participate in God’s divine plan of salvation. Saint John Paul says that this should extend to even our most menial task: “awareness of man’s work is a participation in God’s activity and ought to permeate . . . even the most ordinary of everyday activities.”3 Jesus himself asserts the goodness of work by his labors, for he experienced the hardships of man’s daily toils. Christ “work[ed] by the sweat of his brow,” for as John Paul II reflects, Jesus “devoted most of the years of his life on earth to manual work at the carpenter’s bench.”4 By learning his earthly father’s trade, Christ blesses both the worker, and the task at hand. Christ demonstrates that anything that we do—no matter how insignificant or burdensome it may be—reflects our cooperation in God’s creation, and His plan for salvation, for Christ accomplishes the work of the Father on earth. Thus, Saint John Paul II continues, Christ provides a “‘Gospel of work,’ showing that the basis for determining the value of human work is not primarily the kind of work being done, but the fact that the one who is doing it is a person.”5 Work itself, then, has a “measure of dignity” because man himself performs the activity of work.6
    This is why human dignity becomes wounded when man is unable to work, or when working conditions degrade him. For this reason, the Church has repeatedly condemned communistic, socialistic, and utilitarian work theories or conditions, and has tirelessly defended the dignity of man in the workplace. When the value of man’s labors succumbs to force, and is driven towards a purely materialistic end, man’s inherent dignity, given him by God in the Garden of Eden, diminishes in the eyes of all. The person becomes a forced laborer whose sole purpose of existence is to serve the state, and its ends. Productivity now defines man, and his role in the work place. When the end of man’s work does not aim to benefit humanity as a whole, and to praise God, then human nature is degraded. Instead of work transcending man, completing him, he is reduced to productivity rates, becoming a disposable commodity. Work now defines who the human person is, and human dignity is reduced to what he produces.
    Keeping the Sabbath is integral to recognizing the dignity of workers, for worship is oriented toward praising God. By keeping Sunday holy, working people imitate God who created for six days, and rested on the seventh. In Sacramentum Caritatis, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI speaks of the relationship of the Sabbath and the worker as that which causes man to understand his role as co-creator:
    Quote
    Quote It is on the day consecrated to God that men and women come to understand the meaning of their lives and also of their work.7

    Man was not made to work; work was intended for man, and in exercising this duty, man comes to a better understanding of himself. In taking a day of rest, man orders his week to God, the ultimate Creator, and so leads all of creation in praise to God.
    Man’s work culminates on the Sabbath in his participation of the liturgy where all human work becomes sanctified, and culminates in the cross. The Liturgy, focusing on the sacrifice of the cross, is the opus dei, the work or act of God restoring creation. The liturgy transcends man, for as Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI says, the liturgy as the opus dei is “the place where all opera hominum comes to an end, and are transcended and, thus, the place where a new freedom dawns.”8
    At the Mass, the faithful unite their work to that of Christ’s efforts, and in so doing, their work becomes sanctified, blessed, and made new. This is especially emphasized during the words of consecration, for that “which the earth has given, and human hands have made . . . and the fruit of the vine, and the work of human hands” becomes the Bread of Life, and our spiritual drink—the Body and Blood of Christ. Through the liturgy, man offers to God the fruits of his labors, and his toils are sanctified, and begun anew.
    Human work is sacred because it is redemptive. It is sanctifying for we are able to unite our work to that of Christ’s. God’s plan for humanity always entailed this redeeming reality, for work originated, not as a punishment for sin, but given to man as a good. Through his responsibilities, man sanctifies himself, and in so doing, sanctifies the world in leading all of creation in praise to God. Jesus Himself blessed man’s toils through the work of his hands as a carpenter, and by fulfilling his Father’s work through his public ministry. In everything Jesus accomplished, he did so in union with his Father. He teaches us to do the same, for in uniting our work to that of the Father’s, our work is blessed and redeemed. Thus, the daily toils of human beings transform them and the world, allowing humanity to actively participate in God’s eternal creative power.
    From a Catholic perspective, May 1 entails much more than just celebrating worker’s rights. In choosing St. Joseph as the patron saint of workers, the Church reminds the world of the sanctity of work. Jesus learned the importance of work from Saint Joseph, who labored and experienced the trials of providing for his family. Without the spiritual element of work, man will succumb to its drudgery, and consider his labors as toil. By ordering his work to praise God, man experiences, in some way, the joy and blessedness of labor which Adam experienced in the Garden of Eden.

    Offline Last Tradhican

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #9 on: May 01, 2019, 11:09:43 AM »
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  • All very interesting, however, I go to mass today because it is a Feast of St. Joseph, I do not go because it is a Catholic "labor" or "May day" , anyone that goes for that is blind. 

    Man is not dignified by his work, he is dignified only because of God's Grace. Man has created nothing of his own but sin. 
    The Vatican II church - Assisting Souls to Hell Since 1962

    For there shall arise false Christs and false prophets, and shall show great signs and wonders, insomuch as to deceive (if possible) even the elect. Mat 24:24

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #10 on: May 01, 2019, 04:56:34 PM »
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  • Does anyone know who is this priest? A wonderful speaker and a rundown on the history of so much evil in the world in just 16 minutes.




    [color=var(--yt-spec-text-primary)]Pope Pius XII's Institution of the Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    Sermon from 2005 on why was this feast day created.  What is significant of the day May 1st?  What is May Day? Why was this chosen to be the feast day?  What were the plans of the Illuminati? Have they been successful?  This is a call to all men to "Esto Vir!" (Be a Man!)  For more please go to http://www.audiosancto.org & say 3 Hail Marys for the priest please.

    Go, then to Joseph, and do all that he shall say to you;
    Go to Joseph, and obey him as Jesus and Mary obeyed him;
    Go to Joseph, and speak to him as they spoke to him;
    Go to Joseph, and consult him as they consulted him;
    Go to Joseph, and honour him as they honoured him;
    Go to Joseph, and be grateful to him as they were grateful to him;
    Go to Joseph, and love him, as they love him still.
     
    - St. Alphonsus Liguori -
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    Repeating: does anyone know who is this priest? 


    Offline Your Friend Colin

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #11 on: May 01, 2019, 04:59:16 PM »
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  • Another questionable act of Pius XII, instituting this feast on Communist “May Day” (the high holy day of communists).

    He sought to speak highly of labor, to win their sympathies.

    Today, the breviary speaks of labor being sanctified (not of us sanctifying our labors, but as though labor already  possessed this intrinsic quality):

    Labor is holy?

    That would be a very grave error.
    Isn't this essentially the ideology Jose Maria Escriva and Opus Dei?
    Humble thy spirit very much: for the vengeance on the flesh of the ungodly is fire and worms. - Ecclesiasticus 7:18

    Offline songbird

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #12 on: May 01, 2019, 07:20:37 PM »
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  • Very early this morning St. Joseph's (New Order ) Church was arsoned. Today, May 1.  And thank you for this post.

    Offline songbird

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #13 on: May 01, 2019, 07:22:44 PM »
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  • I am sorry, this arson took place in Scottsdale,AZ 

    Offline Last Tradhican

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    Re: Feast of St Joseph the Worker (1-May)
    « Reply #14 on: May 01, 2019, 10:26:13 PM »
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  • Isn't this essentially the ideology Jose Maria Escriva and Opus Dei?
    Exactly. 
    The Vatican II church - Assisting Souls to Hell Since 1962

    For there shall arise false Christs and false prophets, and shall show great signs and wonders, insomuch as to deceive (if possible) even the elect. Mat 24:24

     

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