Author Topic: Donor to Medical Science  (Read 642 times)

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Offline John Grace

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Donor to Medical Science
« on: March 26, 2013, 05:43:43 PM »
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  • I didn't deem it appropriate to "speak" in the prayer section but I noted the late Mrs Deirdre Manifold has donated her body to medical science.

    Ironically I was speaking to a staff member, who works for the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge at Seán MacDermott St in Dublin yesterday. No sister was available but I will put my questions in writing.  

    I enquired about why women discovered in 1993 at High Park were cremated and asked her to relate my disagreement with their order regarding cremation.

    Regarding donating to medical science, what is church teaching on this matter? I would inclined to disagree with donating.

    Offline Mithrandylan

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #1 on: March 26, 2013, 06:22:09 PM »
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  • I don't know for sure, but I think you're right.  Our body is not ours to donate.  
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    Offline Sigismund

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #2 on: March 26, 2013, 08:36:57 PM »
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  • Medical education needs to happen, and cadavers are needed for it.  As long as the bodies are buried properly, I don't see any problem with it.  In fact, I think it is kind of an act of charity.
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Seraphia

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #3 on: March 26, 2013, 09:25:41 PM »
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  • When my father died we let them have his eyes for medical practice. How else is a medical student going to learn properly? It would be just as foolish for me to not let the medical students examine my gallbladder after it was taken out, just because it was a part of my body. They aren't going to desecrate it. Let's not get too scrupulous. In fact I thought it was a good thing that may help a future patient. If I donated my body to medicine (although I don't know why they would want this broken down husk), I wouldn't mind. My family doctor would make sure it would not be used for nefarious purposes, only education.

    Or would you like new doctors practice on you (with living organs) instead? I would like my doctor to have at least some familiarity with an organ before he started in on mine.

    Oh and that rules out a body never having an autopsy either because they often examine the body, cutting and so on, sometimes with intense examinations, and organ removal, occasionally with new doctors observing and learning as well. As long as the body is disposed of properly -- family requests and burial, there shouldn't be a problem.




    Offline PerEvangelicaDicta

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    Offline MrsZ

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #5 on: March 30, 2013, 10:21:53 AM »
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  • My main concern would be with organ donation and the necessity of having a living body from which to harvest the organ.  There is a question about the definition of death from a medical and ethical standpoint.  The concept of brain death is a new one and it has facilitated the doctor's ability to take organs from what they define as a person in a vegetative state, with a functioning heart and respiratory system.  

    Offline Cato

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #6 on: March 30, 2013, 01:48:40 PM »
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  • I would only donate organs if I knew who it was going to:  a close family member or friend.  Since I don't have any family members in that kind of need and I'm relatively young, I don't see that ever happening.  If I die as an old man, my organs would be worn out;  I don't see any use in donating them.  My biggest concern is on resurrection day and in heaven;  I want my body to be as complete as possible.

    Offline St Gertrude

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 01:55:33 PM »
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  • Quote from: Seraphia
    When my father died we let them have his eyes for medical practice. How else is a medical student going to learn properly? It would be just as foolish for me to not let the medical students examine my gallbladder after it was taken out, just because it was a part of my body. They aren't going to desecrate it. Let's not get too scrupulous. In fact I thought it was a good thing that may help a future patient. If I donated my body to medicine (although I don't know why they would want this broken down husk), I wouldn't mind. My family doctor would make sure it would not be used for nefarious purposes, only education.

    Or would you like new doctors practice on you (with living organs) instead? I would like my doctor to have at least some familiarity with an organ before he started in on mine.

    Oh and that rules out a body never having an autopsy either because they often examine the body, cutting and so on, sometimes with intense examinations, and organ removal, occasionally with new doctors observing and learning as well. As long as the body is disposed of properly -- family requests and burial, there shouldn't be a problem.





    As someone who was both a coroner and a teacher of forensic medicine for decades, I can tell you that your family doctor will not have any say as to how the body is used.  Bodies are stored in the cadaver lab at the medical school (which is generally part of the Department of Anatomy).  When all of the required dissection has been done, the body is cremated and the ashes either buried in a common grave with the ashes of other donors or returned to the family.  In an anatomical teaching hospital, there is, frankly, sometimes not too much left for burial.  And yes, that is how we learn anatomy and physiology, but I myself would not be comfortable with being a donor.  


    Offline stgobnait

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 10:38:50 AM »
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  • When my father died, he left a letter to say he wanted his remains to  to go to medical science, i was not happy about that, and didnt follow his instructions, to this day, i dont know if did the right thing...........

    Offline Stubborn

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    Donor to Medical Science
    « Reply #9 on: March 31, 2013, 12:34:29 PM »
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  • From Audio Sancto: May We Donate Our Organs
    For a small gain they travel far; for eternal life many will scarcely lift a foot from the ground. - Thomas A Kempis

     

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