Author Topic: Do you "do" "Easter" eggs?  (Read 451 times)

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Offline Neil Obstat

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Re: Do you "do" "Easter" eggs?
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2017, 09:05:49 PM »
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    There is no shortage of images on the Internet for "red easter eggs."
    (Greek Orthodox red Easter egg tradition)
     (more Greek red Easter eggs, in Greek basket!)
     (Russian & Ukranian Easter eggs)

    From:
    http://guardianlv.com/2014/04/what-you-might-not-know-about-easter-eggs-and-other-traditions/



    “Easter” eggs, or more specifically painted eggs, actually predate Christianity. There have been 60,000 year old decorated eggs that have been discovered in Africa, and as early as 3000 B.C., red dyed Persian eggs were given as gifts to honor the first day of spring. Christianity at some point adopted the practice of dying eggs red, retelling the story of Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection. The red dye was to represent Christ’s blood shed on the cross, and the egg, cracked open–or “hatched,” on Easter Sunday was meant to symbolize Jesus emerging from the tomb, having been given new life.
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    Those who practice Greek Orthodox still follow this historical tradition, which can be dated back to the early Christian church in Mesopotamia. The exact reason the Orthodox Church adopted the tradition is still disputed among the practitioners. The most commonly told story is that since Mary Magdalene, who was Biblically the first to see the empty tomb after Christ’s resurrection, rushed to the Roman emperor to explain what she saw. The emperor told Mary that her story was erroneous and the only way he would believe her is if the eggs in the basket next to him would turn red, which legends say they did instantly. Another story tells the tale of the Virgin Mary offering the guardsmen of her son’s tomb a basket of eggs, so they would treat him with care. Grieving over the loss of her son while preparing the eggs, legend says that Jesus’ mother’s tears turned the eggs red. According to a different variation, an anonymous woman is said to have been doubtful of Christ’s resurrection unless the eggs in her hands turned red, which they did miraculously reforming her doubt.
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    The red dye associated with Greek Orthodox traditions comes from boiling the eggs with onion peels. Before contemporary commercial dye products, vegetable peelings, fruit juices, tree bark, and flower petals were used to color eggs, but using these natural products is no longer the most popular preparation. Launching its commercial dissolvable capsules in the 1880s, the PAAS Dye Co. was the first to package dye marketed for Easter egg coloring. Currently, the company claims to annually sell upwards of 10 million kits including dyes, paints, glitter, stickers, and more, which decorate nearly 180 million eggs.
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    There are many American Easter traditions, but perhaps one that may be unfamiliar to much of the population is the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, which takes place the Monday after Easter. What makes this event unique is that it is the only time throughout the year that tourists are allowed on the presidential lawn. The gathering was started by Dolly Madison in the early 1800s on the Capitol lawn and later moved to the White House in 1878. Rutherford B. Hayes was president at the time. Presently about 4,000 children attend the Easter Egg Roll, and it is expected for the president to participate as well.
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    Commentary by Stacy Feder.
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    And this is why we know the White House has returned to Christianity.



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    I couldn't help but plug this in as the punch line. Thanks.
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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Do you "do" "Easter" eggs?
    « Reply #16 on: April 20, 2017, 09:21:30 PM »
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    Personally, I'm fascinated with the Russian Easter egg-decorating designs, but not being familiar with Russian food, I'd have to give first priority to Greek red Easter eggs, since Greek food is absolutely top-notch IMHO.
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    A properly made Greek salad cannot be beat. There's something about the kalamata olives, extra goat Feta cheese, real Greek dressing (with a lot of oregano), diced cucumbers, tomatoes, and red onion, for which there is no substitute. 
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    So call me prejudiced but I might just add a red Easter egg to the salad. Sliced, that is.
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