Author Topic: Difference between felt and wool scapular?  (Read 1776 times)

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Offline nctradcath

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Difference between felt and wool scapular?
« on: July 17, 2017, 12:01:53 PM »
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  • Dear forum,

    At the sermon yesterday, Father mentioned that many scapulars are felt and not wool. Does anyone have both and can someone post a comparision of both?

    Thank you,
    David

    Offline Seraphina

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #1 on: July 17, 2017, 01:05:19 PM »
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  • Wool is sturdier, more durable.  Felt scapulars tend to be the inexpensive kind that fall apart quickly.  


    Offline RoughAshlar

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #2 on: July 17, 2017, 03:52:23 PM »
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  • I could be mistaken, but isn't felt made of wool?

    Offline Seraphina

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #3 on: July 17, 2017, 07:33:58 PM »
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  • I could be mistaken, but isn't felt made of wool?
    Good quality felt is made of wool, but most of what is sold for felt, ie. at Michaels Crafts, is 100% polyester.  The scapular front and back, but not necessarily the strings, should be real wool.  If a person is allergic to wool, a cloth may be sewn over the wool.

    Offline Fanny

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #4 on: August 13, 2017, 02:04:17 PM »
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  • Felt is a style of fabric, not a type of fabric.
    Just as satin does not mean silk,  so felt does not mean wool. 

    A scapular is required to be made of wool.

    The small scapulars consist essentially of two quadrilateral segments of woolen cloth (about two and three-quarter inches long by two inches wide), connected with each other by two strings or bands in such a manner that, when the bands rest on the shoulders, the front segment rests before the breast, while the other hangs down an equal distance at the back. The two segments of cloth need not necessarily be equally large, various scapulars having the segment before the breast of the above dimensions while the segment at the back is much smaller. The material of these two essential parts of the scapular must be of woven wool; the strings or bands may be of any material, and of any one color. The color of the segments of woolen cloth depends on the color of the Carmelite habit, ...                                                The Catholic Encyclopedia
    According to the Sacred Congregation of Indulgences wool is necessary and exclusively to be used in the making of scapulars.  Cotton, felt, of wool woven into the fashion of lace will not suffice.  A picture or decoration must never deprive the color of the Scapular of its predominance.                       


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #5 on: August 13, 2017, 06:26:08 PM »
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  • Dear forum,

    At the sermon yesterday, Father mentioned that many scapulars are felt and not wool. Does anyone have both and can someone post a comparision of both?

    Thank you,
    David
    .
    The Brown Scapular of Mt. Carmel is granted a very powerful indulgence and power, more so than any other sacramental (scapular or whatever else). Once a Baptized person is invested with the Brown Scapular by a Catholic priest, he is a walking edifice (so to speak) of Scapular blessing, such that when his scapular wears out or is lost, all he has to do is get a replacement, even if he makes his own from brown wool cloth, and by putting the scapular on over his head, the scapular becomes a blessed sacramental. He does not need to have the new scapular blessed by a priest. No other sacramental has this power.
    .
    But the material of the cloth patch of whatever size it is (some are only a half inch square but it's still a scapular) must be of 100% wool. Polyester, cotton, satin, silk, fleece, rayon, acetate, synthetic, nylon, or whatever you might dream up next, does not qualify. It must be wool. The scapular can have an image on it, a sewn message, the picture of a saint or some design or someone who is not a saint. To emphasize the unimportance of the image, my priest told us from the pulpit, We got a great deal on this bunch of scapulars I brought with me today, which have a picture of Hilary Clinton on them. That got a big laugh.
    .
    I was a volunteer for a Juvenile Hall chapel visiting program, whereby we would go into the locked areas and talk one-on-one with the children prisoners there. We could bring rosaries, holy cards and brown scapulars. This was about 1992. One day, we were informed by the so-called chaplain (not a priest) that a new directive from Roger Cardinal Mahony had arrived, such that we could no longer distribute brown scapulars. The reason was that on the scapular it says that anyone who dies wearing this scapular will not suffer the fires of hell. Some of the children reading this came to believe that so long as they were wearing a scapular, they could go out and commit crimes or gang violence and they'd be immune from ill effects of their misdeeds. Therefore, in order to prevent them from engaging in related nefarious activity, the Cardinal's solution was to forbid the distribution of brown scapulars to the inmates. That'll teach 'em a thing or two! At the time it made me wonder: Is this what St. Maximilian Kolbe would have done? Is this the solution that Padre Pio would have suggested? Is this the kind of plan that the Cure of Ars would have dreamed up?
    .
    I don't think so.
    .
    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Offline Pax Vobis

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #6 on: September 15, 2017, 07:32:17 AM »
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  • Does the wool have to be brown?  I'm assuming, technically, no.  But, since the carmelites wore brown wool habits, the spirit of the law would say yes.  Curious if anyone knows for sure.

    Offline TKGS

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #7 on: September 15, 2017, 03:27:31 PM »
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  • Does the wool have to be brown?  I'm assuming, technically, no.  But, since the carmelites wore brown wool habits, the spirit of the law would say yes.  Curious if anyone knows for sure.
    Rather hard to be a brown scapular if the wool isn't brown.  It would be like a three sided square.  The brown is an intrinsic property of the the brown scapular.

    The Church has approved a scapulars of other colors, but those scapulars do not come with the promises of our Lady that are attached to the brown scapular.


    Offline Tradplorable

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #8 on: September 18, 2017, 08:26:16 AM »
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  • The best 100% wool scapulars can be obtained here:

    http://www.rosescapular.net/

    Offline LuvNHzMrc

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #9 on: February 06, 2018, 03:12:56 PM »
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  • "... even if he makes his own from brown wool cloth...

    But the material of the cloth patch of whatever size it is (some are only a half inch square but it's still a scapular) must be of 100% wool. Polyester, cotton, satin, silk, fleece, rayon, acetate, synthetic, nylon, or whatever you might dream up next, does not qualify. It must be wool. The scapular can have an image on it, a sewn message, the picture of a saint or some design or someone who is not a saint."

    Great Info!
    Thanks!
    May I ask where you got it from?  I ask because I started making Brown Scapulars not too long ago and one of my suppliers told me that the wool had to be "100% woven". I don't like the "woven" material because it falls apart really easily. I have been using 100% Merino wool felt...brown of course. I believe, and hope, that the textile I am using is okay.  From what I have read on a Carmelite site it just states "100% brown wool" nothing about "woven". However, The Catholic Encyclopedia (online) states "woven wool". 

    Now I gotta contact the Carmelites that I know to get a solid confirmation on this thought.
    Peace & Blessings!  :D

    Offline Mega-fin

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #10 on: February 06, 2018, 06:38:06 PM »
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  • What exactly is “woven” wool? What makes it “woven”?


    Offline Fanny

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #11 on: February 06, 2018, 07:15:28 PM »
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  • Great Info!
    Thanks!
    May I ask where you got it from?  I ask because I started making Brown Scapulars not too long ago and one of my suppliers told me that the wool had to be "100% woven". I don't like the "woven" material because it falls apart really easily. I have been using 100% Merino wool felt...brown of course. I believe, and hope, that the textile I am using is okay.  From what I have read on a Carmelite site it just states "100% brown wool" nothing about "woven". However, The Catholic Encyclopedia (online) states "woven wool".

    Now I gotta contact the Carmelites that I know to get a solid confirmation on this thought.
    Peace & Blessings!  :D
    What you are using is not o.k.  It's got to be woven wool, 100%.

    Offer to a carmelite to pay for material for her to make herself a new habit, asking for the old habit in return, and you will have all the 100% woven wool you need to make as many scapulars as your heart desires while in the process performing an act of charity.

    Since her old habit was blessed, the scapulars you make won't need reblessing...
    Remember that whatever picture you put on the scapular may not hide the fact that the primary material it is made from is wool.

    Offline Fanny

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #12 on: February 06, 2018, 07:25:08 PM »
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  • What exactly is “woven” wool? What makes it “woven”?
    woven: The fibers create a little criss-cross pattern that you can only see if you have great vision. Look closely at a linen napkin or altar cloth.

    Felt: fibers are pressed together with steam and pressure to allow the fibers to naturally interlock.  Look closely at the felt your children use in crafts.

    Now, you CAN get 100% wool woven felt, which is what the carmelites use in making their habits.  Woven Felt is Wool woven into a cloth then felted using steam and pressure to make the fibers interlock.



    Offline Mega-fin

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    Re: Difference between felt and wool scapular?
    « Reply #13 on: February 06, 2018, 09:34:35 PM »
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  • woven: The fibers create a little criss-cross pattern that you can only see if you have great vision. Look closely at a linen napkin or altar cloth.

    Felt: fibers are pressed together with steam and pressure to allow the fibers to naturally interlock.  Look closely at the felt your children use in crafts.

    Now, you CAN get 100% wool woven felt, which is what the carmelites use in making their habits.  Woven Felt is Wool woven into a cloth then felted using steam and pressure to make the fibers interlock.
    Thank you! These are things I have no experience with. Most cheap scapulars are made with the felt variety. Glad I’ve always made sure mine are 100% wool. 

     

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