Author Topic: CNN feminist hero  (Read 2415 times)

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Offline Matthew

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CNN feminist hero
« on: July 31, 2018, 09:51:32 AM »
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  • She's 35 -- and runs a $3 billion company
    by Haley Draznin   @haleydrazJuly 31, 2018: 7:45 AM ET
    [size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}][size={defaultattr}]
    Stitch Fix founder Katrina Lake is one of the wealthiest female entrepreneurs in the country, but it wasn't too long ago that she could have never imagined herself as a CEO.
    "There haven't been a lot of founder CEOs that look like me," Lake tells CNN's Poppy Harlow in an episode of Boss Files. "I showed up as a girl who spent a lot of her life in California who said 'like' a lot, and kind of looked like what you would expect for that."
    Lake, who is now 35, says starting a company was never on her radar and her time studying at Stanford deterred her even further.
    "I looked at people like [Google founders] Larry [Page] and Sergey [Brin], who were coders, who were sitting in a garage, and building a company, and I looked at that and didn't see myself in that," she says. "I just think it took me a while to think that this was a path that was available to me."
    Yet, that didn't stop her from becoming the youngest woman ever to take a company public. Last year, Lake was named by Forbes as one of the wealthiest self-made women in America.
    Lake was enrolled in a pre-med program when she was at Stanford. She intended to follow in her father's footsteps and become a doctor, but she was drawn more towards the world of economics than the lab. She worked for a retail consultant group and at a venture capital firm before enrolling at Harvard Business School to pursue a master's degree in entrepreneurship.
    It was at Harvard that she came up with the idea for Stitch Fix. As part of a class project, Lake sought to bring a better shopping experience into the homes of women who don't have easy access to a wide range of fashion options or the time to shop around. What she came up with was a personalized shopping service that uses algorithms and recommendations from stylists to curate boxes of clothing and accessories that match a customer's style, size and fit preferences.
    Stitch Fix was launched in 2011. The company has seen significant growth since, with 2.7 million customers and more than $1 billion in revenue. "All of our growth was organic. It was just people telling other people," Lake says.
    But the road to success has not been easy.
    Related: Nasdaq CEO: We need more female leaders in the financial industry
    Lake struggled to raise money in an industry dominated by male investors. She says she had to convince the men in the room that Stitch Fix was a service women actually wanted.
    "It was just a woman's product. I definitely think that it didn't help," Lake says. "You can't blame the kind of individual for having that preference, but then you step back and realize 94% of venture investors are male and have similar preferences. And so, I think that it unquestionably made it harder."
    Taking the company public was another hurdle.
    Just days before Stitch Fix's debut on the stock exchange last November, the company was forced to reduce the size of its $18 to $20 a share offering. The stock opened at $16.90, but fell to $15.15 by the end of its first trading day.
    [/size][/font][/size]
     never thought I would be a CEO
    [size={defaultattr}][font={defaultattr}][size={defaultattr}]"There were some headwinds there, but I think we came out really motivated by the challenge of it," she says. "We've been underestimated before. We're happy to be at a place where we're going to prove ourselves."
    Something else happened during that IPO. A photo of Lake holding her then 14-month-old son as her company went viral on social media and Lake became a role model for women -- and especially mothers -- trying to make it in the startup world.
    "The response was amazing. I never anticipated it," she says.
    Stitch Fix founder and CEO Katrina Lake holding her 14-month-old-son at the company's IPO.
    Stitch Fix has also impressed Wall Street since that Nasdaq debut. The company's stock has more than doubled to nearly $30 a share as it continues to grow its customer base, sales and profits. It's current market cap is nearly $3 billion.
    Related: Rent the Runway CEO on giving all employees equal benefits
    The company has expanded its line to include men's and plus-size clothing. It recently introduced Stitch Fix Kids -- a natural extension for Lake, who has another child on the way.
    Lake says one thing she has realized is that her role as CEO goes far beyond boosting the bottom line.
    "I think it really forces you to think more about what is the culture that I'm creating, what is the impact that I'm having," she says.[/size][/font][/size]
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    Offline Matthew

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #1 on: July 31, 2018, 09:55:06 AM »
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  • What's missing from this article?

    Any mention of a partner, husband, boyfriend or anything. As if she doesn't need men, she doesn't even mention any men in her life at all. That's how independent she is from men. Kind of like the "Bechdel test" (can two women talk about anything that doesn't come around to "men" at some point?) They went out of their way to avoid the topic of marriage/husband.

    They do mention her TWO children however.

    Children don't just happen like magic without a father.
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    Offline 2Vermont

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #2 on: July 31, 2018, 10:17:24 AM »
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  • I googled and found out that the man to her right is her husband, John Clifford.
    "For there is not any thing secret that shall not be made manifest, nor hidden, that shall not be known and come abroad."- Luke 8:17

    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #3 on: July 31, 2018, 10:44:17 AM »
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  • She had a leg up from most people because she went to very good schools. It's not news if someone who went to Stanford and Harvard is successful. Just the name recognition alone will get you very, very far.
    For the pre-Lenten and Lenten season, I'm going to try and be on here far less, if at all.

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    Offline ClarkSmith

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #4 on: July 31, 2018, 11:34:49 AM »
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  • Stories like this paint a false reality that anyone can achieve success.  She obviously came from a well-off family. This isn't a rags to riches story. It's like those commercial trying to get girls into STEM. They're trying to sell science and technology as glamours.  The reality is that most these girls will end up spending much of their adult life sitting in a lab testing urine and blood samples.   I guess that can be rewarding but it's not what the commercials are selling. 


    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #5 on: July 31, 2018, 11:46:27 AM »
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  • Stories like this paint a false reality that anyone can achieve success.  She obviously came from a well-off family. This isn't a rags to riches story. It's like those commercial trying to get girls into STEM. They're trying to sell science and technology as glamours.  The reality is that most these girls will end up spending much of their adult life sitting in a lab testing urine and blood samples.   I guess that can be rewarding but it's not what the commercials are selling.
    Indeed... she is the female Mark Zuckerberg - another person with a massive leg-up to get famous and successful. 

    Going to an exclusive prep school and then Harvard or Stanford when you can afford to do so puts you ahead of nearly the entire planet.
    For the pre-Lenten and Lenten season, I'm going to try and be on here far less, if at all.

    May God bless you all! Ora pro nobis, Mater Misericordiae!

    Offline Matthew

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #6 on: July 31, 2018, 11:54:57 AM »
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  • You're right -- the article basically lied when it called her self-made

    If you are born into wealth, such that your parents can afford to send you to Prep School, and then an Ivy League college, that is hardly the common "rags" that 99.9% of Americans are dealt by default.

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    Online AlligatorDicax

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    "Prep School"?/Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #7 on: August 01, 2018, 10:01:00 AM »
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  • If [...] your parents can afford to send you to Prep School, and then an Ivy League college, that is hardly the common "rags" that 99.9% of Americans are dealt by default.

    What "Prep School"!?  I saw no mention of any "prep school" in the article (as limited by what was imbedded in your original posting).

    You've repeatedly professed to be a "computer programmer", so you couldn't possibly be referring to Stanford, could you!?  Please say it ain't so, Matthew!

    The Leland Stanford Junior [*] University is a private institution that's 1 in just a handful of premier universities for high technology in the world!  Especially for its engineering and applied-sciences orientation, which favors doing things, which is far more conducive to entrepreneurship than the excess of theorizing that dominates scholarship at some other prestigious universities, notably up the freeways at U.C. Berkeley.  And the Business School at Stanford is reputedly no slouch, either.

    -------
    Note *: The odd name that appears on the university's seal is the result of its founder: (silver? magnate) Leland Stanford, naming it in memory of his son: Leland Stanford Junior, who died during childhood.  Despite what might be inferred from its formal name, LSJU actually offers degree programs from undergraduate thro' doctorate, and has significantly greater enrollment for its graduate than undergraduate programs.


    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    Re: "Prep School"?/Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #8 on: August 01, 2018, 11:53:52 AM »
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  • What "Prep School"!?  I saw no mention of any "prep school" in the article (as limited by what was imbedded in your original posting).

    You've repeatedly professed to be a "computer programmer", so you couldn't possibly be referring to Stanford, could you!?  Please say it ain't so, Matthew!

    The Leland Stanford Junior [*] University is a private institution that's 1 in just a handful of premier universities for high technology in the world!  Especially for its engineering and applied-sciences orientation, which favors doing things, which is far more conducive to entrepreneurship than the excess of theorizing that dominates scholarship at some other prestigious universities, notably up the freeways at U.C. Berkeley.  And the Business School at Stanford is reputedly no slouch, either.

    -------
    Note *: The odd name that appears on the university's seal is the result of its founder: (silver? magnate) Leland Stanford, naming it in memory of his son: Leland Stanford Junior, who died during childhood.  Despite what might be inferred from its formal name, LSJU actually offers degree programs from undergraduate thro' doctorate, and has significantly greater enrollment for its graduate than undergraduate programs.
    The Blake School in Minneapolis. A very, very prestigious school in a... let's put it this way. It's in a part of Minneapolis where Matthew would live if he were the next CEO of Microsoft. Very wealthy and very expensive school.
    For the pre-Lenten and Lenten season, I'm going to try and be on here far less, if at all.

    May God bless you all! Ora pro nobis, Mater Misericordiae!

    Offline Matthew

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #9 on: October 02, 2018, 04:41:42 PM »
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  • For some reason, this article is still posted on CNNMoney.... I was thinking of posting it on CathInfo, and I had the same thoughts I had a few months ago as I read it.
    Then I realized I had read the article before.

    I was thinking about not just this lady, but how any "super successful" woman destroys her true happiness because
    A) women don't like to "marry down" (it's human nature). 
    B) If they do find a man to marry, it won't last, because they won't be happy or satisfied with their lame excuse for a man who isn't as successful as they are.
    C) Any man content to let his wife be the primary breadwinner is a beta male cuck with no testosterone, and no woman will be long-term satisfied with such a "man". The successful woman will cheat on her beta husband as soon as the opportunity presents itself.
    D) it's lonely at the top -- not a lot of single men with $3B companies in her league.

    Women can give up family and put all their efforts into working for The Man, but A) most won't find high success, but will spend their days typing in spreadsheets and other banal, unsatisfying work B) those that do make it to the C-Suite will find it most unfulfilling C) they will ultimately suffer loneliness, depression, substance abuse, and end up living alone with a bunch of cats.


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    Offline Matto

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    Re: CNN feminist hero
    « Reply #10 on: October 02, 2018, 06:35:32 PM »
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  • A) women don't like to "marry down" (it's human nature).
    B) If they do find a man to marry, it won't last, because they won't be happy or satisfied with their lame excuse for a man who isn't as successful as they are.
    C) Any man content to let his wife be the primary breadwinner is a beta male cuck with no testosterone, and no woman will be long-term satisfied with such a "man". The successful woman will cheat on her beta husband as soon as the opportunity presents itself.
    D) it's lonely at the top -- not a lot of single men with $3B companies in her league.

    C) they will ultimately suffer loneliness, depression, substance abuse, and end up living alone with a bunch of cats.
    Wow, Matthew. I am a little surprised with you. Hypergamy and cat ladies and successful women divorcing and cheating on their husbands. I hate the phrase but that is what they call "red-pill wisdom". I hate that phrase but I find such ideas to be very interesting and have been learning about such ideas online. Though I disagree with your use of the word "cuck" in this case because I hate that word and also because just being married to a woman who makes good money is not really being a "cuck", that would be voting for democrats, being hen-pecked, being a feminist, or letting her sleep around and not leaving her (although some folk would call ANY MAN who gets legally married in this country a "cuck"). I also disagree with your use of the phrase "beta male" as a pejorative because only the top five percent or so of men are alphas. There is nothing wrong with not being John Wayne. Would you really honestly call yourself an alpha? I wouldn't call myself one. But I was happy to read this post generally. I thought it was cool.
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