Author Topic: Condolences for non-Catholics  (Read 3477 times)

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Offline Exfish

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Condolences for non-Catholics
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2013, 04:35:57 PM »
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  • A Catholic is supposed to say in a non-Catholic setting:
    "I will pray for so and so's soul. Only God knows if he/she is going to Hell".

    Cut and dry.

    Offline clare

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #31 on: December 19, 2013, 05:20:38 PM »
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  • Catholic Encyclopedia

    Quote
    Church laws regarding public offices for the dead

    There is no restriction by Divine or ecclesiastical law as to those of the dead for whom private prayer may be offered — except that they may not be offered formally either for the blessed in heaven or for the damned. Not only for the faithful who have died in external communion with the Church, but for deceased non-Catholics, even the unbaptized, who may have died in the state of grace, one is free to offer his personal prayers and good works; nor does the Church's prohibition of her public offices for those who have died out of external communion with her affect the strictly personal element in her minister's acts. For all such she prohibits the public offering of the Sacrifice of the Mass (and of other liturgical offices); but theologians commonly teach that a priest is not forbidden to offer the Mass in private for the repose of the soul of any one who, judging by probable evidence, may be presumed to have died in faith and grace, provided, at least, he does not say the special requiem Mass with the special prayer in which the deceased is named, since this would give the offering a public and official character. This prohibition does not extend to catechumens who have died without being able to receive baptism (see, v.g., Lehmkuhl, "Theol. Moralis", II, n. 175 sq.). For other cases in which the Church refuses her public offices for the dead, the reader is referred to the article CHRISTIAN BURIAL. (See also MASS; INDULGENCE; PURGATORY.)


    Offline Pelele

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #32 on: December 19, 2013, 08:32:36 PM »
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  • Have you read Liberalism is a Sin, Mabel? In particular, chapters 19-21?

    From what you have said, it would seem you would think Fr. Felix didn't know what he was doing when he named his book Liberalism is a Sin.

    The book says that it was actually published as "What is Liberalism?" in the first english edition, by someone with similar sentiments as yours i would think, since that is "non-offensive" to people.

    Offline Sigismund

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #33 on: December 19, 2013, 09:04:07 PM »
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  • Quote from: clare
    Catholic Encyclopedia

    Quote
    Church laws regarding public offices for the dead

    There is no restriction by Divine or ecclesiastical law as to those of the dead for whom private prayer may be offered — except that they may not be offered formally either for the blessed in heaven or for the damned. Not only for the faithful who have died in external communion with the Church, but for deceased non-Catholics, even the unbaptized, who may have died in the state of grace, one is free to offer his personal prayers and good works; nor does the Church's prohibition of her public offices for those who have died out of external communion with her affect the strictly personal element in her minister's acts. For all such she prohibits the public offering of the Sacrifice of the Mass (and of other liturgical offices); but theologians commonly teach that a priest is not forbidden to offer the Mass in private for the repose of the soul of any one who, judging by probable evidence, may be presumed to have died in faith and grace, provided, at least, he does not say the special requiem Mass with the special prayer in which the deceased is named, since this would give the offering a public and official character. This prohibition does not extend to catechumens who have died without being able to receive baptism (see, v.g., Lehmkuhl, "Theol. Moralis", II, n. 175 sq.). For other cases in which the Church refuses her public offices for the dead, the reader is referred to the article CHRISTIAN BURIAL. (See also MASS; INDULGENCE; PURGATORY.)


    I have apparently given Clare too many up thumbs, but I would certainly up thumb this if I could.  
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Pelele

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #34 on: December 19, 2013, 10:53:54 PM »
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  • Quote from: clare
    Catholic Encyclopedia

    Quote
    Church laws regarding public offices for the dead

    There is no restriction by Divine or ecclesiastical law as to those of the dead for whom private prayer may be offered — except that they may not be offered formally either for the blessed in heaven or for the damned. Not only for the faithful who have died in external communion with the Church, but for deceased non-Catholics, even the unbaptized, who may have died in the state of grace, one is free to offer his personal prayers and good works; nor does the Church's prohibition of her public offices for those who have died out of external communion with her affect the strictly personal element in her minister's acts. For all such she prohibits the public offering of the Sacrifice of the Mass (and of other liturgical offices); but theologians commonly teach that a priest is not forbidden to offer the Mass in private for the repose of the soul of any one who, judging by probable evidence, may be presumed to have died in faith and grace, provided, at least, he does not say the special requiem Mass with the special prayer in which the deceased is named, since this would give the offering a public and official character. This prohibition does not extend to catechumens who have died without being able to receive baptism (see, v.g., Lehmkuhl, "Theol. Moralis", II, n. 175 sq.). For other cases in which the Church refuses her public offices for the dead, the reader is referred to the article CHRISTIAN BURIAL. (See also MASS; INDULGENCE; PURGATORY.)


    For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia is already Modernist.

    Quote from: Sigismund
    I have apparently given Clare too many up thumbs, but I would certainly up thumb this if I could.  


    Yeah, no surprises in you agreeing with that.


    Offline Nadir

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #35 on: December 22, 2013, 04:03:24 PM »
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  • Quote from: Pelele
    Quote from: Nadir
    I say it because it's true. These are two different issues. It shows confused thinking to act as if they are one issue. There's been plenty on both topics , if you want to search them out.


    I still don't know what you're talking about. Just explain what you mean.


    I suggeast that you do a bit more study. It's like apples and elephants.

    Offline StCeciliasGirl

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #36 on: December 22, 2013, 04:15:15 PM »
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  • Quote from: Sigismund
    Quote from: clare
    Catholic Encyclopedia

    Quote
    Church laws regarding public offices for the dead


    I have apparently given Clare too many up thumbs, but I would certainly up thumb this if I could.  


    Picked it up for you; I keep getting those error messages, too. I don't keep count of who I thumb up  :laugh1: In fact, I got an error trying to thumb you up sigis so somewhere in here is a message you wrote with no upvotes because I'd done it too much.

    Good post to upvote, too, Clare.
    Legem credendi, lex statuit supplicandi

    +JMJ

    Offline Sigismund

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    Condolences for non-Catholics
    « Reply #37 on: December 22, 2013, 09:31:09 PM »
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  • Thank you.
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


     

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