Author Topic: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?  (Read 3655 times)

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Offline josefamenendez

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Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2018, 05:48:58 PM »
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  • http://www.truthaboutorgandonation.com/aboutdrbyrne.html

    Dr Paul Byrne is the "go to" source for organ transplant issues

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #16 on: June 16, 2018, 09:45:31 PM »
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  • Organ transplants are definitely not permitted for Catholics.  
    This is not true. What is forbidden to Catholics is the donation of single organs, such as the heart, as heart donation involves the killing of the donor.
    .
    Whereas a kidney may be donated without the death of the donor, if the donation is the free and informed choice of the donor.
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    I have a friend who donated a kidney to his sister many years ago and he is still a strong and healthy missionary bishop.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #17 on: June 17, 2018, 07:28:12 AM »
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  • This is not true. What is forbidden to Catholics is the donation of single organs, such as the heart, as heart donation involves the killing of the donor.

    That's obviously what I'm talking about, organs that, in being removed, would kill the donor.  You failed to include the sentence which followed in quoting my post.

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    They often take out the heart and other organs when you are still alive, thereby killing you, based on their phony definition of "brain death".

    And when you tick the "organ donor" box at least in my state you can't specify which organs.

    Offline Dolores

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #18 on: June 17, 2018, 01:51:14 PM »
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  • Perhaps this will help:

    living will

    I was told by an SSPX priest that we are under no obligation to use "extraordinary" measures to sustain life when it will not effect the outcome.  So hydration and nutrition would be the only things obligatory.

    However there are situations when a medical power of attorney would be more appropriate.

    Marsha
    But under what circumstances are nutrition and hydration necessary?  Surely not under all circumstances.  For example, I have seen many elderly relatives pass away.  Most of the time, in their final days, they lost the strength to eat or drink, but still lived for a few days.  I cannot imagine it to be obligatory to force a feeding tube into people in such circumstances.

    Offline Cera

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #19 on: June 17, 2018, 07:38:17 PM »
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  • I went to a "hospice" to say the Rosary with a dying friend. A nurse friend was with me. Afterwards she told me that the drip bag had no water in it, only morphine and that our friend was being dehydrated to death. I told her to tell our friend's non-Catholic spouse but it was too late; she died the following day. The N. O. daughter told us she was forbidden to give her mother a sip of water because she might choke; she only swabbed her mouth with a q-tip and told us her mother sucked on it as if she was very thirsty.

    In that same time frame, another friend had a mother in the same "hospice" and one relative disregarded the nurses instructions and did give her ice chips to suck on , the other relative did not. This person also was dehydrated to death.

    I will add "not to be deprived of water, ice chips or food" on my instructions and clarify that my family is to check with a Trad priest.
    Pray for the consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary


    Offline josefamenendez

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #20 on: June 17, 2018, 11:09:26 PM »
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  • The only time nutrition or hydration could be omitted is if it does not produce a sustainable benefit to the person or might even endanger them or make the condition worse.  IE: if a person is not able to digest or assimilate feedings via tube and becomes distended/ vomiting/ aspiration/chronic diarrhea.
    IV fluids are usually tolerated well depending on the rate given- but if it would cause congestive heart failure/ pulmonary edema, any extra fluid might exacerbate the condition (mind you, this is a patient NOT responding to diuretics to begin with, and the assumption at this point is that death is imminent)

    Be that as it may, dehydration is a painful and horrible death, and it happens all of the time in the name of palliative "compassion". To me there is no reason for a person to dehydrate in the final days of dying , lest the person actually die of dehydration instead of their original condition!

    Offline mcollier

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    Re: Living will directives for Traditional Catholics?
    « Reply #21 on: June 18, 2018, 02:02:39 PM »
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  • Quote
    Good examples of problems by Nadir.  
    From what I understand & have been told by good Traditional Catholic sources, you just shouldn't sign anything called a "Living Will."  When you're on the operating table or gurney, the doctor is not going to pull out your Living Will & read it; if you say "yes I have a living will", it comes with a sort of assumption about your wishes.  What I've been told is you just have a "medical power of attorney", or "medical decision maker".  That way, if you are unable to make your own decisions, they must consult your medical PofA (a living person), rather than read some document (or not) subject to their misinterpretation.  


    So forget about getting the best wording for a "Living Will".  You don't want to have a LW at all.  You just need a medical decision maker (probably with a backup in case said person is not available).  The one I've heard recommended by Traditional Catholic priests is the PMDD, on the website I mentioned before.  
    Ok. I think I got it now. Makes sense. Thanks! 


     

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