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Offline Briget

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At the Consecration...
« on: August 16, 2015, 11:18:30 PM »
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  • I am wondering here...I was always taught by the sisters to...um...put my fist to my heart as I say "my Lord and my God" during the consecration, each time the bell rings, but as an adult I have seen others make the sign of the cross. Does anyone know the origin of either, and, if there is a correct way for sure?
    Thanks!
    Briget

    Offline Anthony Benedict

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #1 on: August 16, 2015, 11:47:01 PM »
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  • I've always struck the breast at the Elevation, offering the same prayer you were taught, but not at the first or concluding bells.

    There may be other individual customs followed in other places and I cannot say how many even follow any particular custom at all since it is a moment of great intensity and I've never looked 'round to see.

    Insofar as striking the breast is clearly a penitential act, as seen in the three Confiteors and in the Domine non sum dignus (as well as by the priest during the Agnus Dei), it is perhaps the more fitting reverential gesture at each of the Elevations, the manifold theological symbology of the Sign of the Cross notwithstanding.


    Offline Marlelar

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #2 on: August 17, 2015, 12:32:24 AM »
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  • I see both being done but do not know the history behind either gesture.  My missal only says to say "My Lord and My God", but says nothing about gestures.

    Online Nadir

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #3 on: August 17, 2015, 02:32:21 AM »
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  • Of course these are the words of Thomas who doubted the words of the apostles who told him that Jesus had come to them:

    [26] And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Jesus cometh, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said: Peace be to you. [27] Then he saith to Thomas: Put in thy finger hither, and see my hands; and bring hither thy hand, and put it into my side; and be not faithless, but believing. [28] Thomas answered, and said to him: My Lord, and my God. [29] Jesus saith to him: Because thou hast seen me, Thomas, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and have believed.

    I believe one can make either gesture or none. The prayer is an act of Faith.

    Offline Dolores

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #4 on: August 17, 2015, 09:06:01 AM »
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  • As far as I am aware, everything the laity does during Mass is custom (some of it, very laudable and praiseworthy custom, but mere custom nonetheless), and is not prescribed by any liturgical or other law.  There is, therefore, no "correct way" as far as the OP's question is concerned.  There are many pious customs, to be sure, but one is not correct while the others are incorrect.  If a custom is irreverent, then of course it must cease, but between striking your breast or making the sign of the cross, I do not think that one bows to the other.


    Offline Domitilla

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #5 on: August 17, 2015, 11:17:07 AM »
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  • As a young girl, my classmates and I were also taught by the nuns to strike our breast at the Elevation of the Host during the Consecration (prior to the Vatican II Revolution) while repeating the words of St. Thomas, "My Lord and My God".  At the Elevation of the Chalice, we were to again strike our breast while repeating, "My Jesus, Mercy".   After the Revolution, we were advised to refrain from making gestures, including the Sign of the Cross.  Naturally, the clerical revolutionaries wanted all gestures which signalled humility and contrition to be done away with.  

    I notice that we older Traditional Roman Catholics continue to strike our breasts during the Sanctus, Consecration, and the Agnus Dei.  The younger crowd usually refrain from making gestures except after receiving Holy Communion.  Many of them make the Sign of the Cross when exiting the Altar rail.  The nuns trained us to make the Sign of the Cross after making our thanksgiving for the Holy Eucharist in the pew.

    Something else which I find very interesting:  The older people continue to genuflect every time we enter or leave the pew and to perform a double genuflection if for some urgent reason we must exit the pew after the Consecration.  The younger people, especially the young girls from our local SSPX school, rarely bother to genuflect.  

    Offline Domitilla

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #6 on: August 17, 2015, 11:37:26 AM »
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  • Addendum:  We "oldsters" also strike our breasts during the "mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa" contained in the Confiteors and the "Domine, non sum dignus..."  (The ink dried and I just couldn't allow myself to accidently omit the striking of the breast gesture during these prayers.)

    Offline TKGS

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #7 on: August 17, 2015, 02:38:14 PM »
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  • I see and have seen both.

    I was not taught to do anything in catechism class as a child in the immediate aftermath of the Council.  My mother taught me to silently pray, "My Lord and My God".

    I sometimes strike my breast at the elevation of the cup because the Blood of Christ is specifically what I've always been taught was the sign of the remission of sins for which we should have sorrow.


    Offline Domitilla

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    At the Consecration...
    « Reply #8 on: August 17, 2015, 04:03:45 PM »
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  • I must say that I am extremely grateful for the beautiful training I received from the nuns.  The term, "lex orandi, lex credendi" (which they taught to us) has taken on a deeper meaning with each passing year.  The nuns taught the Holy Mass to us with solemnity, reverence, order, and exactitude.  Naturally, attending  daily Holy Mass under their watchful guidance nurtured an abiding love for the Holy Faith and Her Sacraments in us.  They carefully emphasized the importance of assisting at Holy Mass with humility and contrition and the gestures of striking the breast, bowing the head, and praying with the words of the Apostles certainly underlined this attitude while witnessing the utter beauty and magnificence of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.  Those nuns were an irreplaceable treasure.  One of the worst chastisements we have suffered is their loss.  May our Good God reward each and every one of them.  They gave their all in order to give us the tools for our salvation ....

     

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