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Offline MaterDominici

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Any homeschoolers here?
« on: March 11, 2010, 03:53:21 PM »
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  • I've been reading about various ideas and approaches to homeschooling and was wondering if anyone here is/was homeschooling. If so, what flavor of homeschooler are you?
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline clare

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #1 on: March 11, 2010, 04:11:29 PM »
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  • Autonomous, at the moment! Basically, we do what my daughter tells me! I'm hoping that as she accumulates more knowledge, she'll appreciate a more structured approach.


    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #2 on: March 11, 2010, 06:58:43 PM »
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  • Quote from: clare
    Autonomous, at the moment! Basically, we do what my daughter tells me! I'm hoping that as she accumulates more knowledge, she'll appreciate a more structured approach.


    So you'd be the "unschooling" sort.  :smirk:

    I'm reading from a Charlotte Mason-inspired mom's book right now, "Real Learning." I like many of the ideas, but her application of them doesn't always appeal to me -- some of it seems too right-brained for my left-brained self.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline Ladislaus

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 09:28:52 PM »
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  • We use most of the Seton material.

    Offline SJB

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #4 on: March 12, 2010, 09:44:34 AM »
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  • Quote from: Ladislaus
    We use most of the Seton material.


    We use Seton as well. It seems more professional and better organized than many traditionalist homeschool programs.
    It would be comparatively easy for us to be holy if only we could always see the character of our neighbours either in soft shade or with the kindly deceits of moonlight upon them. Of course, we are not to grow blind to evil


    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #5 on: March 12, 2010, 05:50:08 PM »
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  • I don't know anything about Seton because I've yet to come across anyone passionate about them -- just a mention here or there. I tend to get my information from family blogs of one sort or another.

    I read one passionate "unschooler" -- they're out there and not even remotely Catholic, but some good can be extracted from the concept. (Plus, she's amusing, so I keep reading.)

    A few of the families I follow are the do-it-yourself curriculum sort. They definitely have structure, but the mom does all the planning.

    What has my interest right now is referred to as "real learning". It focuses on teaching the student to love learning and allowing them to discover / learn a bit more independently than formal cirriculum allows. A big focus is on learning through books (not textbooks or workbooks).  :reading: They move away from the idea that homeschooling is about recreating a classroom at your kitchen table.

    Seton's website looks like an advertisement for correspondence courses. Is that how they work? Anyone care to explain how they operate?
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline treadingwater

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #6 on: March 27, 2010, 05:14:24 PM »
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  • we are homeschoolers...
    I don't think we have a flavor of our own. I think every program or method has its advantages and disadvantages. So I like to borrow from them all.  I like to research what is required for the prescribed grade level, and use that as a basis.
    I don't like buying a planned curriculum like seton, there is always so much material to cover, it dosen't leave any room for exploring what your student wants to learn, but i think every student needs the structure and planned seatwork that you get with a curriculum based program.
    I like the unschoolers idea that everything in life is an opportunity for learning, and that you should explore and answer all of your kids questions. I definetely try to keep this a daily part of our life.
    I like charlotte masons idea of always reading live books with your kids and having them read aloud and having active discussions.
    I'm by no means a homeschooler with all the answers, but I'm always looking for new ideas, trying to be a better teacher. I don't think there is any one perfect method, maybe the spaghetti method "keeping throwing thoughts and ideas at your kids and hope something sticks!"

    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #7 on: March 27, 2010, 08:36:23 PM »
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  • Thanks, treadingwater!

    Do you have any favorite spots on the web for homeschooling materials or ideas?

    I'm sorry I haven't gotten back to your other question. We've been sick here this week and there hasn't been much down time.
     :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:
    Well, not that kind of sick, but there's a limited smiley selection.   :smirk:
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...


    Offline Lybus

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #8 on: March 28, 2010, 11:30:09 AM »
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  • I haven't done any research, but I have been doing a lot of thinking on homeschooling.

    It almost seems that the very idea of establishing a "curriculum," or a, "class" or "session" seems to make one shudder almost immediately. Labeling an education, separating it from regular life, makes it seem very undesirable.

    Why put a label on it at all? Why not actually mingle it into daily life?
    Perhaps one scenario could be this. You need to teach your child multiplication. Perhaps you could say that in order to play with this ball, you must first play a game with me. If you can count all of these apples before I count my apples, you can play ball. While the child's counting them individually, I could set mine up in groups of 4 or such, and multiply to get the answer quickly. The child will be dumbfounded, and ask how I did it. I will then show him how, by explaining multiplication to him, and possibly division. Then I would let him try it for a while. Then we'd play again, and I'd let him win ;)

    There! no mention of schooling, or classrooms, or education! He didn't even know i was teaching him anything, just showing him a trick.
    I'm not sure if this will work very well on the more abstract stuff, like rhetoric in literature, but I think it would be a start. I just think that if you are going to teach something, practicality, like using mulitplication to find out how many real apples you have, is important. It makes it seem less schooling and more practical.
    True, you need to have a bit of flair for excitement and the dramatic to keep it interesting, but I guess you could work on it. These are just my ideas.

    In regards to being a responsible man, would it be interesting to learn, after six years of accumulating all the wisdom you could, that you had it right all alon

    Offline Telesphorus

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #9 on: March 28, 2010, 01:32:36 PM »
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  • Most folks need a set curriculum because they lack the expertise to improvise their own course of study.

    If such a curriculum is not adhered to, typically their children fall behind.

    Of course intelligent parents do not need a curriculum, and they would be holding their children back by adhering to rigidly to one, just as they would be holding their children back by sending them to school.

    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #10 on: March 28, 2010, 02:08:53 PM »
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  • The problem I experienced in school (which would apply to following a set cirriculum) was not being able to fully persue things I was interested in.

    Part of the idea behind the book I'm reading is that when your child expresses an interest in something, you give them the tools then and there to explore that subject, even if it means they fall slightly behind in something else.

    Even if a child falls seriously behind in something by formal schooling standards, you ask yourself how much you'll require of them to establish proficiency and thereby free up their time to follow their interests. These "interests" usually take the form of things not stressed in formal cirriculums such as music, art, theater or even athletics.

    For me, this was always math. Even in college, I slept through Calculus class (it was at 8 am afterall  :smirk:), still had As on every assignment, and yet the teacher wasn't interested in giving me anything more than what was required. (Of course, one could argue that at 18 I should have been a little more self-motivated, but I think I'll blame that on my public school teachers as well.  :laugh1:)

    I'm sure that didn't come across very coherently as I've been interrupted 3 or 4 times... another thing that book says is that you shouldn't ignore your children when they come to talk to you!  :faint:
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...


    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #11 on: March 28, 2010, 02:23:01 PM »
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  • Quote from: Telesphorus
    Most folks need a set curriculum because they lack the expertise to improvise their own course of study.


    This perhaps is more true for older children, but you really can't go to "wrong" with elementary-aged children. Everyone knows you should teach them math, reading, and writing. It's also easy to pick up a book of basic skills for each grade level or check and see what your state requirements are for the public school teachers.

    Whether my child learns about Pilgrims as a 1st grader, 3rd grader, or 5th grader really isn't ultimately all that important.

    Now, when they're older, and the subject topics tend more and more to building upon one another, I would think following some sort of cirriculum (even as only a guide) might be easier than not.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline Ladislaus

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #12 on: March 28, 2010, 03:31:38 PM »
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  • Curricula can be important as well when it comes to the regulations in certain states; some states will harrass you if you don't have a formal curriculum but will leave you alone if you're in one of the approved programs.

    Offline MaterDominici

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    Any homeschoolers here?
    « Reply #13 on: March 28, 2010, 04:35:28 PM »
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  • Quote from: Ladislaus
    Curricula can be important as well when it comes to the regulations in certain states; some states will harrass you if you don't have a formal curriculum but will leave you alone if you're in one of the approved programs.


    Unfortunately, I'm sure that's true.

    That consideration doesn't cross my mind much as I'm fortunate to live in a state (Texas!  :cowboy:) with very minimal homeschool requirements. The law says I have to be engaged in bona fide education and that's about it.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline Ladislaus

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    « Reply #14 on: March 28, 2010, 05:07:40 PM »
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  • In Ohio we have to report officially to the superintendent, submit our curriculum, and quite a bit of other paperwork.  If the homeschooling parent has a Bachelor's degree (or higher) -- which we both do -- we can start our own school and use our own curriculum.  Even with that, they would give us the third degree if we used our own.  So we just took the easy way out--lest CPS come knocking on our door--and went with an approved curriculum (Seton) and independent scoring of their exams.

     

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