Author Topic: User Poems  (Read 59817 times)

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Offline 1st Mansion Tenant

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« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2012, 03:22:26 PM »
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  • After studying the life of the Little Flower, I was very humbled by her faith and sanctity. I was saddened by the doubt that I would never achieve such humility and  great faith anywhere near the level she embodied. I wrote the following little poem, and later found a quote where she said it would make her happy if poems were written to her someday, since they would serve to glorify God.


    A Blade of Grass
    (in honor of St. Therese)

    If I can't be a flower
    Then I'll be a blade of grass,
    To cushion Our Lord's footsteps
    Where He is wont to pass.

    Others are more worthy
    His holy gaze to meet;
    So I will be content to
    Simply lie beneath his feet.

    Not a sticker nor a thorn,
    (There are enough of those.)
    Let me be a blade of grass
    If I can not be a Rose.



    Offline michaela benedicta

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    « Reply #31 on: December 13, 2012, 09:00:02 PM »
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  •  :dancing:

    Yay! I am so happy that this thread is here!
    Here is a little poem that I wrote while I was converting:

    "Holy Hour"

    Resting my hands on the cool marble
    I tremble, for I am very near
    The altar of my Lord.
    I have never been this close before..
    As my eyes drink in the splendour,
    I kneel.
    The sanctuary lamp, with its comforting flickering
    Stained glass windows, that display the sun's last rays
    In a brilliant kaleidoscope of light
    In the hush of the church,
    I am alone,
    Save for my Lord
    Who is reading my heart
    And listening to my prayers.
    The soft, red carpet under my knees,
    The towering altar before me
    Leaves me breathless and longing
    For the day when I can fully Communicate
    With my Redeemer.
    No longer a bystander--
    A stranger peering through the window,
    But another unworthy servant
    Receiving undying love
    And soul-filling nourishment.        

        June 8th, 2003(I wish there was a blushing emoticon!!)

    "God's power is made perfect in infirmity" --St. Paul


    Offline Lighthouse

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    « Reply #32 on: December 14, 2012, 08:47:44 PM »
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  • Very well done, Michaela!

    Offline michaela benedicta

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    « Reply #33 on: December 14, 2012, 09:33:08 PM »
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  • Thank you, Lighthouse!

    We need to get more people over to this section to get creative!  :scratchchin:

    Love,
    michaela +

    "God's power is made perfect in infirmity" --St. Paul

    Offline lauraelizabeth

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    « Reply #34 on: February 08, 2013, 01:54:10 PM »
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  • My body is so old, it doesn’t shine at all
    and water is eating it alive!
    There is still so much left of me
    half dead muscles
    and thick wilting skin
    Why do I still want
    milk and bread and meat
    even though I’ve seen the tree
    and heard the blood pooling at her feet
    We could, instead, sit in the wood
    our hands dug profoundly in the snow
    We are sorry
    and the river swells around us
    making our bodies hurt more
    Drink the wine before the water eats that, too!
    I did as you said
    a decent daughter has to
    I placed my breath onto a cloth
    and washed your poor feet
    with balmy strokes
    We admired the sky
    missing, all the while,
    the calf eating a patch of grass beside us


     :scared2:  hahaha. eep!


    Offline St John Burke

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    « Reply #35 on: February 16, 2013, 07:34:16 AM »
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  • Very well done, Lauraelizabeth, the iconography of the washing of the feet and the calf is particularly outstanding.

    Offline St John Burke

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    « Reply #36 on: February 16, 2013, 07:56:14 AM »
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  • The Holy Rood

    Walkest thou unto that lonely hill,
    The hill that concealeth Adam's bones,
    And behold the flowers, of hue white and golden
    That sprang up at the touch of the Nail's sweet balm.

    Walkest thou unto that lonely hill,
    To stand a while, and marvel aloud,
    At the cruelty of men, and the love of angels,
    Who watched Emmanuel, with agony rapt,
    Pleading for the souls of Eve's wretched race.

    Walkest thou unto that lonely hill,
    Clothed in sack-cloth and washed in ashes,
    Bitter herbs 'pon thy lips, and Palm-fronds in thy hand,
    Singing of the Passion and the Harrowing of Hell,
    Of the Sun of Righeouness, of the Three and One.

    Walkest thou unto that lonely hill,
    Beyond the Walls, to see the Holy Rood,
    Of crude fashion it is, rough and unyielding,
    Whereon the Son of Man wast hung,
    And comfort the Maid that weepeth there.

    - my own rather poor contribution to this section.


    Offline AnneCatherine

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    « Reply #37 on: March 01, 2013, 01:16:47 PM »
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  • My son "had" to write a poem for school to "describe his generation," and I think it's good for free verse (even if I weren't his mother).  I'd like to post it when it's copied because it is amazing in the face of being at a public school for the year.

    It doesn't look like people come here any more, but I'll put one up that was written by a shy person I know about 30 years ago.  I guess it's "free verse?"


    Adoration

    Lord enshrined in gold,
    Though poverty was once Your plight,
    How oft I’ve yearned to rend this Veil
    Which hides and yet
    Reveals to sight
    My Savior.
    O, but if that Veil were rent
    I would be dissolved and spent;
    too weak to see Your Face and live
    But for this humble Sacrament!

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine
    So I may also be a sign;
     That wonders happen still

    -Anon


    Offline AnneCatherine

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    « Reply #38 on: March 02, 2013, 02:32:32 AM »
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  • My son came home with his poem "homework," and said that I could post it.  It's "free verse" and was supposed to be about "his generation." While being his mother helps, I thought it was good for his age and that it took some courage to submit this on his own in public school:

    Our Generation
    We care little,
    We do little,
    We think little,
    We know little.
    We stand betwixt the stars affixed
    in the heavens and another place.
    Amidst the confines of time and space,
    much like those before us.
    They stood and thought where
    we stand and think about life
    Life, what a life, a life which
    Endures,
    Persists,
    Perplexes and
    Passes with time.
    A time for everything
    to live
    to die
    to fly
    to the stars?
    The stars that shine.
    The stars that shone.
    The stars that reside beyond
    in the other place,
    The place afar,
    and yet so close!
    A place to which the heavens cannot compare.
    We eat,
    We drink,
    But do we fain to be merry?
    For tomorrow death awaits.
    So what is this place, and where?
    How to get there?
    Do we take a giant leap
    lest per chance we fall asleep?
    A leap of faith.
    A leap of trust.
    A leap beyond?
    We look without.
    We look within.
    For both therein we find
    the answer.
    The answer,
    the purpose,
    the reason,
    the wonder,
    Our Creator,
    Christ the King!

    Offline MyrnaM

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    « Reply #39 on: March 02, 2013, 08:28:55 AM »
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  • I love these lines in the first poem, in fact I will add them to my daily prayers.

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine

    Offline Memento

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    « Reply #40 on: March 04, 2013, 06:06:13 PM »
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  • Your poem "the Holy Rood" is beautiful, St. John Burke.  A true Lenten poem...

    Have you ever heard of Enid M. Dinnis and her book The Anchorhold?  It is a magnificent classic that I think you would appreciate.  It can be found at Tradibooks.com.


    Offline AnneCatherine

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    « Reply #41 on: March 08, 2013, 11:30:34 PM »
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  • Quote from: MyrnaM
    I love these lines in the first poem, in fact I will add them to my daily prayers.

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine


    Dear Myrna,

    Yes, I like that as a prayer too.  The version I put up may not be best, since the 2nd part might read:

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine.
    Change all my life into a sign
    That wonders happen still

    I like the idea that He did the miracle at Cana partly as a "sign" of the Blessed Sacrament, in which He longs to be "one" with us.  Since we're weak and sinful, that unity can't become perfect unless we let Him change our corrupted desires into His.  At that point, we won't even exist (as we were), but some people begin to notice more and more peace-- even in the midst of trials and "dry" periods. Some even see outright miracles happen!  

    But you're probably way ahead of me on all that.  BTW, I love your artwork. Art is another interest I have in common.

    God Bless,   :pray:
    Anne~

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    « Reply #42 on: June 26, 2013, 07:27:17 PM »
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  • Quote from: AnneCatherine
    Quote from: MyrnaM
    I love these lines in the first poem, in fact I will add them to my daily prayers.

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine


    Dear Myrna,

    Yes, I like that as a prayer too.  The version I put up may not be best, since the 2nd part might read:

    You once changed water into wine,
    Then change my will
    To make it Thine.
    Change all my life into a sign
    That wonders happen still

    I like the idea that He did the miracle at Cana partly as a "sign" of the Blessed Sacrament, in which He longs to be "one" with us.  Since we're weak and sinful, that unity can't become perfect unless we let Him change our corrupted desires into His.  At that point, we won't even exist (as we were), but some people begin to notice more and more peace-- even in the midst of trials and "dry" periods. Some even see outright miracles happen!  

    But you're probably way ahead of me on all that.  BTW, I love your artwork. Art is another interest I have in common.

    God Bless,   :pray:
    Anne~



    While the thought is sweet and the intention innocent, it seems to me
    there might be a theological problem with this.  

    We pray in the Our Father, "Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven."  

    That is the pure essence of what God wants of us.  There is no prayer more
    theologically perfect than the Pater Noster, ----------- IMHO.  

    (I know -- that sounds like an oxymoron.)

    But to say, Please change my will, like Thou changest water into wine,
    change my will and make it thine (small t is correct because it's not a
    personal pronoun, but a possessive pronoun: singular, second person
    possessive pronoun, archaic, actually, but we like it just the same!) is
    in a way a bit presumptuous.  For, if God would change our will into
    his own will, then He would be in a sense taking away our own will and
    replacing it with his own, lest He would be taking away our personhood
    and making us as it were another person of the Blessed Trinity.  Then
    one plus one plus one plus one would be three.  That's another problem.

    But it's the confusion of the creature with the creator that is at stake
    here.  Our will is ours, and God's will is God's.  We are certainly well-
    disposed to ask that his will be done (on earth as it is in heaven) but
    to say 0BLITERATE MY WILL AND GIVE ME THINE OWN WILL INSTEAD,
    is over the top.  

    IMHO.

    This was the trouble with the Kingdom of the Divine Will psycho-group
    with which a close relative of mine got involved and I suspect has
    become demonically possessed as a result.  IMHO again.

    God's will is most real and God's respect of our own will is likewise most
    real.  It is perhaps our most precious possession, inasmuch as it could
    be the thing that decides whether we are saved or damned for all
    eternity.  Nobody goes to hell if they really don't want to.  Nobody is
    deprived of heaven if they desire nothing whatsoever to do with hell.
    Everyone who goes to hell does so with their own cooperation and/or
    consent.

    God's respect of our free will is perhaps the greatest mystery ever.

    IMHO again.

    What are we, that God would respect our free will?  We are something
    like an ant on a dunghill in an uninhabited remote corner of nowhere,
    compared to the vastness of the universe, and all the mysteries
    thereof, known to us and also yet undiscovered by us.  What is the
    comparison?  To Him and to his will, we and our tiny will are none to
    compare.  And yet, He respects our free will.  

    Now, for us to come along and say, "No, I don't respect my own free
    will, even if Thou dost, O Lord, so please take it away and replace it
    with thine own will,"  does not recognize the dignity - the everlasting
    dignity
    - that God bestows on our free will.  

    We don't have to understand WHY He does so;  we don't have to
    comprehend WHAT He's got 'in mind' with this scheme;  we don't
    have any claim on a right to know his reasons for doing this.   All
    we need to know is, that God has bestowed an everlasting
    dignity
    on our puny, miniscule, contemptible, nothingness
    free will, and that should be enough for us.  We ought to have the
    humility to ACCEPT what God has decided shall be, and not attempt
    to get 'under the hood' with our 'cracker-jack toolbox' and attempt
    to rebuild the engine that drives the universe.  



    It's that big-a-deal!








    Our father, Who art in heaven,

    Hallowed be thy Name.  

    Thy kingdom come, thy will be done,

    On earth as it is in heaven.  

    Give us this day our daily bread,

    And forgive us our trespasses;

    As we forgive those who trespass against us.

    And lead us not into temptation,

    But deliver us from evil.

    Amen.  








    There is no poem of greater depth and beauty.



    IMHO, again.



    Pater noster, qui es in coelis,

    Sanctificetur nomen tuum.

    Adveniat regnum tuum,

    Fiat voluntas tua,

    Sicut in caelo et in terra.  

    Panem nostrum quotidianum,

    Da nobis hodie.

    Et dimitte nobis demita nostra,

    Sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris.

    Et ne nos inducas in tentationem,

    Sed libera nos a malo.

    Amen.





    In fond memory of Richard Keys Biggs,

    Conductor, father and friend of thousands.

    RIP.




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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    « Reply #43 on: June 26, 2013, 11:47:44 PM »
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  • Et dimitte nobis debita nostra



    ... debita, not demita ...  


    (The Biggs Pater Noster is probably the finest composition of
    the prayer yet seen, outside of Gregorian Chant.   It's polyphony
    but has a Chant ambiance to it.  Very special. SATB, and I think
    it's also available in TTBB, because Biggs ran a fine men's chorus.
    TTBB means Tenor1, Tenor2, Baritone, Bass.)



    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Offline CantareVivace

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    « Reply #44 on: June 28, 2013, 08:59:50 PM »
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  • These Poems are beautiful.

     :applause:
    "Never be in a hurry; do everything quietly and in a calm spirit. Do not lose your inner peace for anything whatsoever, even if your whole world seems upset." -Saint Francis de Salles



    Contact Info:
    Character Name: CantareVivace
    Email: robert.mar

     

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