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Author Topic: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture  (Read 1874 times)

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Offline DigitalLogos

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Re: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2022, 07:38:27 AM »
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  • Sorry but no. In fact, this statement is scandalous. We look up to the teachings of the popes as the vicar of Christ and the final arbiters of Catholic doctrine. We look up to bishops as the successors of the Apostles, who have the authority to teach the Church and are part of the living magisterium. We look up to the cardinals, similarly, as princes of the Church who are appointed to that position by the pope for their learning and piety. To put one ex-Jesuit priest ahead of most of those people is not a Catholic attitude at all.
    St. Thomas Aquinas
    St. Bonaventure
    St. Augustine

    All could be justly put "ahead" of most people in the realm of theology. Certainly not the apostles, no, but they stand above a good number of Popes, Cardinals, Bishops and priests.
    "For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears:" [2 Tim. 4:3]

    O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding the profane novelties of words, and oppositions of knowledge falsely so called. [1 Tim. 6:20]

    Offline Incredulous

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    Re: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture
    « Reply #16 on: April 04, 2022, 07:47:55 AM »
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  • Recall that his punishment resulted from Bobby Kennedy taking offence, running to his Dad Joe who get got the Kennedy house bishop, Cardinal Cushing to organise measures in Rome.

    Cushing got complaints from various people including a mother (1961) and a priest (Fr Chabot 1967) about Paul Shanley's crimes against young boys throughout the sixties. His response at the end of the sixties was to make Shanley's apostolate to street youth permanent. Error and moral depravity are so often the closest things. I recall someone claiming that the perverted, tormented Shanley made claims against Cushing.

    Wonder what offended RFK at the St. Benedict’s Center?

    Read that JFK stopped by the St. Benedict’s Center in Boston and was well received. 

    Before he left, Father Feeney even mentioned that charismatic Irishman had the potential to become a U.S. president.

    On the contrary, RFK was said to have visited and was apparently miffed by the SBC’s staunch Catholic militancy.  He walked out saying he knew more Protestants that would go to Heaven before the SBC crowd would.

    If the Jєωs hadn’t shot RFK,I think he would have won the 1968 election, but would have been a liberal president.

    In contrast, JFK had the Catholic graces of wisdom, to seek the Confessional 4 hours before the Jєωs αssαssιnαtҽd him.

    Who’s in Heaven now and who is not?  JFK’s & RFK’s murderers surely didn’t make it.
    "Some preachers will keep silence about the truth, and others will trample it underfoot and deny it. Sanctity of life will be held in derision even by those who outwardly profess it, for in those days Our Lord Jesus Christ will send them not a true Pastor but a destroyer."  St. Francis of Assisi


    Offline In Principio

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    Re: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture
    « Reply #17 on: April 05, 2022, 08:37:35 AM »
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  • I too salute Fr. Feeney. Before him was Fr. Arnold Damen and Fr. Mueller who fought for No salvation outside the church.  Fr. Arnold Damen was chosen to come to America under Fr. De Smet! 
    Fr. Feeney's understanding of EENS clashes with Fr. Muller, who taught BOD extensively throughout his works.
     "The faithful should obey the apostolic advice not to know more than is necessary, but to know in moderation." - Pope Clement XIII, In Dominico Agro (1761) 

    Offline songbird

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    Re: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture
    « Reply #18 on: April 05, 2022, 02:14:27 PM »
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  • I read Fr. Mueller's No Salvation outside the Church.  It did not clash at all, it just affirmed for Fr. Feeney that there were communists in the universities 50 years before Fr. Feeney came on the scenes and he saw it as well.

    Offline In Principio

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    Re: Fr. Feeney: Designs of The Jєωs On Art & Architecture
    « Reply #19 on: April 07, 2022, 02:15:02 PM »
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  • I read Fr. Mueller's No Salvation outside the Church.  It did not clash at all, it just affirmed for Fr. Feeney that there were communists in the universities 50 years before Fr. Feeney came on the scenes and he saw it as well.

    Fr. Muller's teaching on EENS clashes with Fr. Feeney's understanding of it, as can be seen in Chapter 5 of that book, where Fr. Muller, quoting Orestes Brownson and St. Robert Bellarmine, explains: 

    Quote
    "'out of the Church no one can be saved,' is to be understood of those who are of the Church neither actually nor in desire."
      
    He goes on to explain in that chapter that catechumens that die without actually receiving the sacrament of baptism can be saved.

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    "St. Thomas teaches with regard to these, in case they have faith working by charity, that all they lack is the, reception of the visible sacrament in reality; but, if they are prevented by death from receiving it in reality before the Church is ready to administer it, that God supplies the defect, accepts the will for the deed, and reputes them to be baptized. If the defect is supplied, and God reputes them to be baptized, they are so in effect, have in effect received the visible sacrament, are truly members of the external communion of the Church, and therefore are saved in it, not out of it. (Summa, 3, q. 68, a. 2, corp. ad 2. et ad 3)."

    Further on in that chapter, he affirms implicit BOD:

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    "If a person cannot receive Baptism or Penance in reality, and is aware of the obligation of receiving it, he must have the explicit desire to receive it; but, if he is not aware of this obligation, he must have at least the implicit desire to receive it, and this desire must be joined to divine faith in the Redeemer and to an act of perfect charity or contrition, which includes the sincere desire of the soul to comply with all that God requires of it in order to be saved."

    In his famous book "Prayer: The Key to Salvation", he says:

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    “Any other loss can be made up for, but never that of prayer; if, on account of a delicate constitution, you cannot fast, you may give alms; have you no occasion to confess, you may obtain forgiveness of your sins by making an act of perfect contrition; nay, even the Sacrament of Baptism may be supplied by the real desire of it, and a perfect love of God, but no other means of salvation is left for him who does not love to practise prayer.”

    Here are some other examples of Fr. Muller's teaching on this:

    Familiar Explanation of Christian Doctrine (1875), p.295  https://archive.org/details/familiarexplana00mlgoog

    The Prodigal Son (1875), p.398  https://archive.org/details/theprodigalsonor00mulluoft

    God the Teacher of Mankind (1880)


    Here's what he teaches in God the Teacher of Mankind, Vol.VI, "Grace and the Sacraments" (pp.218-222):

    Quote
    8. Can the baptism of water be ever supplied?

    When a person cannot receive the baptism of water, it may be supplied by the baptism of desire, or by the baptism of blood.


    Almighty God is goodness itself.  Hence he wishes that all men should be saved.  But, in order to be saved, it is necessary to pass, by means of baptism, from the state of sin to the state of grace.  Infants, therefore, who die unbaptized, can never enter the kingdom of heaven.  The case of grown persons is somewhat different; for, when grown persons cannot be actually baptized before death, then the baptism of water may be supplied by what is called the baptism of desire.

    There is an infidel.  He has become acquainted with the true faith.  He most earnestly desires baptism. But he cannot have any one to baptize him before he dies.  Now, is such a person lost because he dies without the baptism of water?  No; in this case, the person is said to be baptized in desire.

    9. What is the baptism of desire?

    An earnest wish to receive baptism, or to do all that God requires of us for our salvation, together with a perfect contrition, or a perfect love of God.

    An ardent desire of baptism, accompanied with faith in Jesus Christ and true repentance, is, with God, like the baptism of water.  In this case, the words of the Blessed Virgin are verified: “The Lord has filled the hungry with good things.” (Luke i, 35.) He bestows the good things of heaven upon those who die with the desire of baptism.  We read of a very interesting instance, in confirmation of this truth, in the Annals of the Propagation of the Faith:  It is related by M. Odin, missionary apostolic, and, subsequently, Archbishop of New Orleans, Louisiana:  “At some distance from our establishment at Barrens,” he says, “in Missouri, United States of America, there was a district inhabited by Protestants or infidels, with the exception of three or four Catholic families.  In 1834 we had the consolation of baptizing several persons there:  thus it was that the Lord was pleased to reward the kindness with which one of the most respectable inhabitants gave us hospitality every time we journeyed that way.  This worthy man, who was not a Catholic, had three little children, who received with eagerness the instructions we never failed to give them.  The tallest of the sons, only eight years old, especially showed such a particular relish for the word of God, that he learned by heart the entire catechism.  Evening and morning he addressed his little prayer to the good God; and if ever his little sister missed that holy exercise, he reproached her very seriously.  Things were at this point when the cholera broke out in the neighborhood.  Then this good little boy said simply to his mother:  ‘Mamma, the cholera is coming here:  oh! how glad I should be if the priests from the seminary came to baptize me!  That cruel disease will attack me, I am sure it will, and I shall die without baptism; then you will be sorry.'  Alas! the poor child predicted truly:  he was one of the first victims of the dreadful plague.  During the short moments of his cruel sufferings he incessantly asked for baptism, and even with his last sigh he kept repeating:  “Oh if any one would baptize me!  My God!  must I die without being baptized?'  The mother, thinking that she could not herself administer that sacrament, although there was evident necessity, was in the greatest trouble; neither would the child consent to receive it from the hands of a Protestant minister.  At last he died without having obtained his ardent wish.  As soon as I heard of the cholera being in that part of the country, I hastened thither; but I only reached there some hours after the child's funeral.  The family was plunged in the greatest affliction.  I consoled them as much as I could, and especially in relation to the eternal destiny of their poor little one, by explaining to them what the Church teaches us on the baptism of desire.  This consoling doctrine much assuaged their grief; after giving the other necessary instructions, I baptized the mother and the two young children, and, some days after, the father failed not to follow the example of his family.” (“Catholic Anecdotes,” p. 547.)

    Although it be true that the fathers of the Church have believed and taught that the baptism of desire may supply the baptism of water, yet this doctrine, as St. Augustine observes, should not make any one delay ordinary baptism when he is able to receive it; for, such a delay of baptism is always attended with great danger of salvation.


    10. What is the baptism of blood?

    Martyrdom for the sake of Christ.

    There is still another case in which a person may be justified and saved without having actually received the sacrament of baptism, viz.:  the case of a person suffering martyrdom for the faith before he has been able to receive baptism.  Martyrdom for the true faith has always been held by the Church to supply the sacrament of baptism.  Hence, in the case of martyrdom, a person has always been said to be baptized in his own blood.  Our divine Saviour assures us that “whosoever shall lose his life for his sake and the gospel, shall save it.” (Mark viii, 35.)  He, therefore, who dies for Jesus Christ, and for the sake of his religion, obtains a full remission of all his sins, and is immediately after death admitted into heaven.

    St. Emerentiana, while preparing to receive baptism, went to pray at the tomb of St. Agnes.  While praying there, she was stoned to death by the heathens.  Her parents were greatly afflicted, and almost inconsolable, when they learned that their daughter had died without having received baptism.  To console her parents, God permitted Emerentiana to appear to them in her heavenly glory, and to tell them not to be any longer afflicted on account of her salvation, “for,” said she, “I am in heaven with Jesus, my dear Saviour, whom I loved with my whole heart, when living on earth.” (Her Life, 23d Jan.)

    St. Genesius of Arles is also honored as a saint, because, for refusing to subscribe to a persecuting edict of Maximilian, he was put to death, though, at that time, he had not been baptized.
     "The faithful should obey the apostolic advice not to know more than is necessary, but to know in moderation." - Pope Clement XIII, In Dominico Agro (1761)