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Author Topic: theology of squatting  (Read 675 times)

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Änσnymσus

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theology of squatting
« on: August 04, 2022, 01:12:56 AM »
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  • In considering the probability of nuclear war or other catastrophe in the near future, I foresee that some Catholics will need to evacuate their own homes. Even some "bug out" homes may be contaminated, inadequate, or unsafe for a variety of reasons (plague, fallout, no irrigation, marauders, feudal lords, etc.) . In relocating it may be necessary to survive by squatting on unoccupied properties, the owners of which may have already succuмbed or or may be unable to make use of the property to which they hold title.

    Of course it is not an option to force others out of their own occupied homes, but what of squatting?

    I'd be interested to hear application of relevant Catholic moral theology to this hypothetical.

    Offline SimpleMan

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    Re: theology of squatting
    « Reply #1 on: August 04, 2022, 05:41:15 AM »
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  • In considering the probability of nuclear war or other catastrophe in the near future, I foresee that some Catholics will need to evacuate their own homes. Even some "bug out" homes may be contaminated, inadequate, or unsafe for a variety of reasons (plague, fallout, no irrigation, marauders, feudal lords, etc.) . In relocating it may be necessary to survive by squatting on unoccupied properties, the owners of which may have already succuмbed or or may be unable to make use of the property to which they hold title.

    Of course it is not an option to force others out of their own occupied homes, but what of squatting?

    I'd be interested to hear application of relevant Catholic moral theology to this hypothetical.

    This would fall under the Thomist concept of the "ultimate destination of goods".  There would be no moral objection to "squatting" in such a crisis, especially if the properties were unoccupied and could be foreseen not to be reclaimed by their owners in any reasonable period of time.


    Online Mithrandylan

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    Re: theology of squatting
    « Reply #2 on: August 04, 2022, 09:31:57 AM »
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  • Aquinas teaches that in necessity, all things are common property. This is why he argued a man can 'steal' bread to feed his starving family, and that such an act isn't theft at all. 

    So, as long as the need was severe, I can't imagine he would object to squatting of the kind you are describing. 
    "Be kind; do not seek the malicious satisfaction of having discovered an additional enemy to the Church... And, above all, be scrupulously truthful. To all, friends and foes alike, give that serious attention which does not misrepresent any opinion, does not distort any statement, does not mutilate any quotation. We need not fear to serve the cause of Christ less efficiently by putting on His spirit". (Vermeersch, 1913).

    Offline Matthew

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    Re: theology of squatting
    « Reply #3 on: August 04, 2022, 10:32:33 AM »
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  • Aquinas teaches that in necessity, all things are common property. This is why he argued a man can 'steal' bread to feed his starving family, and that such an act isn't theft at all.

    So, as long as the need was severe, I can't imagine he would object to squatting of the kind you are describing.

    Yes, there are various moral conundrums that might come about in a collapse scenario -- but this isn't one of them.

    Pretty clear-cut I'd say. If the family is gone or dead, you can use it, basically treat it as yours. We're talking about a collapse scenario. What are you supposed to do, go to the "authorities" and purchase it? With what? Again, we're talking about a collapse scenario -- you can't buy abandoned properties on Realtor.com. There will be no electricity, much less Internet or Realtor.com. People won't be "going to work" in the traditional sense. There will be plenty of work going on -- but not for the man. There will be no money, unless you count barter which could include silver/gold. But even using silver/gold will be more like barter than traditional "currency" transactions.
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    Offline AMDGJMJ

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    Re: theology of squatting
    « Reply #4 on: August 04, 2022, 10:38:40 AM »
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  • Aquinas teaches that in necessity, all things are common property. This is why he argued a man can 'steal' bread to feed his starving family, and that such an act isn't theft at all.

    So, as long as the need was severe, I can't imagine he would object to squatting of the kind you are describing.
    Oh, wow...  I hadn't heard of this one before.  Thanks for sharing!  I am going to have to look this one up.  It would be good to know more about.  🥰
    "Jesus, Meek and Humble of Heart, make my heart like unto Thine!"

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    Änσnymσus

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    Re: theology of squatting
    « Reply #5 on: August 04, 2022, 10:47:29 AM »
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  • Thank you all.