Author Topic: Should apostate relatives be disowned?  (Read 2309 times)

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Anonymous

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Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2017, 02:29:02 PM »
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  • They disowned me and then I disowned them

    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #16 on: May 10, 2017, 08:39:00 AM »
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  • Being a traditional catholic, means you are a follower of Christ.  You are disowned by your family and friends and not the other way around.  You are to be yourself.  Think of it this way, you have the truth (like 1 plus 1 is two).  So, the others are burning bridges. You don't change, you don't compromise. You still wish them happy birthday and etc.

    Those of us who have been there and done it, know how it goes.  It was my siblings who told me what I have is mine and not for them.  So, they are saying, don't try to convert me. Now this is my family brought up as cradle catholics!  I had one tell me she would have nothing to do with me.  Another who told me I lost my faith. ( a protestant)  Others who just plan don't communicate.  That is their choice.  And they come from no religion to New Order and they call that Loving your neighbor.  At first it hurts and as the years go, you are used to it, sad to say. Yes, they do become a cold enemy and we pray for them.
    Do you go to SSPX? What aspect about your faith do your siblings find so troubling that they want to do nothing to do with you? If they are from the same family how can some of them be from no religion while some come from Novus Ordo?


    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #17 on: May 15, 2017, 06:53:01 PM »
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  • Alright, this is what makes me cringe in the SSPX.  We have the hardliners that make it sound like its the truly Catholic thing to do.  So does a father disown his own adult son and grandchildren because he won't leave the Novus Ordo?  Does a son disown his mother and father because they went once to a SSPX parish, but haven't returned yet because they struggle with accepting the truth about the state of the Church? Does a brother disown a brother because he joined the Sadavicantists, the "Resistance" SSPX-MC, or another traditional group.  What constitutes an apostate?  What constitutes drifting away? 

    Do you need your priest's approval/guidance before you call them an apostate and cut ties?  Does it mean when someone stops driving 2+ hours to Mass every week?  Does it mean someone who has had a bad situation with in the SSPX and stopped coming?  Does this mean someone who left the SSPX or followed their fav priest elsewhere?    I am not asking because I want an answer, but rather so people will just think.  Its really easy to give someone else advice and draw a hard line, but come on.  You get one family.  Is this the way we want the SSPX community to be?  We are the parishioners.  People are influenced by the way others in the community act as well as what we see here online.  This obviously was a question in earnest.  Do you want to be shunned by your family or community when you have to make a hard moral decision and your feel you are doing the right thing?

    There are MANY reason's why one might drift away.  We have heard some pretty weird things from Bishop Williamson, Fr. Pfieffer. We have been told...things such as denim is too masculine of a fabric for girls to be around, one SSPX priest claimed that as priests they were part Christ and the parishioners carried the sin of pride of they questioned the priest's directives....but I would still be Novus Ordo if that was the case.  If there was a clear line, priests wouldn't be leaving the SSPX.  There are stories of sexual abuse in Australia and Europe.  There was the incident with Fr. Pfeiffer and the pedo priest Fr. Tetherow in PA.  There are some scary stories within the SSPX, so why disown your family.

    Offline songbird

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #18 on: May 15, 2017, 07:09:22 PM »
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  • Be as St. Monica as she was with St. Augustine, her son.  You keep it to prayer and prayer can be consoling, guiding, instructing.  I asked Our Lady if she would give me a dream, like St. Bosco.  A dream to help me to see where our daughter was coming from when she "was" on drugs.  I got a dream, and it made me cry, but I thanked My Lady, for she did help me to see where she was.  We pray for everyone, as like Christ, forgive them, they do not know what they are doing.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #19 on: April 06, 2018, 02:35:25 PM »
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  • St. Francis of Assisi basically disowned his own biological father, saying that the bishop was his true father.


    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #20 on: April 06, 2018, 03:57:10 PM »
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  • St. Francis of Assisi basically disowned his own biological father, saying that the bishop was his true father.
    “Hitherto I have called Pietro Bernardone father; but now I am the servant of God.”

    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #21 on: April 06, 2018, 04:42:05 PM »
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  • From Lord of the World by Fr. Robert Hugh Benson

    Father Francis, who had been sitting in a lax kind of huddle, seemed to know his thoughts, and sat up suddenly.

    "You are tired of me," he said. "I will go."

    "I am not tired of you, my dear father," said Percy simply. "I am only terribly sorry. You see I know that it is all true."

    The other looked at him heavily.

    "And I know that it is not," he said. "It is very beautiful; I wish I could believe it. I don't think I shall be ever happy again—but—but there it is."

    Percy sighed. He had told him so often that the heart is as divine a gift as the mind, and that to neglect it in the search for God is to seek ruin, but this priest had scarcely seen the application to himself. He had answered with the old psychological arguments that the suggestions of education accounted for everything.

    "I suppose you will cast me off," said the other.

    "It is you who are leaving me," said Percy. "I cannot follow, if you mean that."

    "But—but cannot we be friends?"

    A sudden heat touched the elder priest's heart.

    "Friends?" he said. "Is sentimentality all you mean by friendship? What kind of friends can we be?"

    The other's face became suddenly heavy.

    "I thought so."

    "John!" cried Percy. "You see that, do you not? How can we pretend anything when you do not believe in God? For I do you the honour of thinking that you do not."

    Francis sprang up.

    "Well—-" he snapped. "I could not have believed—I am going."

    He wheeled towards the door.

    "John!" said Percy again. "Are you going like this? Can you not shake hands?"

    The other wheeled again, with heavy anger in his face.

    "Why, you said you could not be friends with me!"

    Percy's mouth opened. Then he understood, and smiled. "Oh! that is all you mean by friendship, is it?—I beg your pardon. Oh! we can be polite to one another, if you like."

    He still stood holding out his hand. Father Francis looked at it a moment, his lips shook: then once more he turned, and went out without a word.


    Offline Croix de Fer

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #22 on: April 07, 2018, 07:06:39 AM »
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  • All my immediate relatives who were raised Traditional Catholic to some degree....

    "Traditional Catholic" is a relative term. Case in point are the numerous women on this forum.
    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)


    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #23 on: April 07, 2018, 07:11:23 AM »
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  • should they be disowned if they convert to Judaism or marry a Jew?

    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #24 on: April 07, 2018, 09:20:21 AM »
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  • It's sad.  If you are asking this question, then you have already written then it if your hearts.   You are more list then they are. 

    Anonymous

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    Re: Should apostate relatives be disowned?
    « Reply #25 on: April 10, 2018, 10:46:31 PM »
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  • Charity requires us to pray for family members who have gone astray from the Catholic Faith. 

    There is no requirement to associate with those who have left the Faith though. If anything, to do so would be like ignoring the giant elephant in the room. 

    The only exception would be that in getting together the discussion would be solely centered on the apostate recovering their Faith. 


     

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