Author Topic: No shortage of idiots  (Read 286 times)

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Änσnymσus

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No shortage of idiots
« on: May 02, 2021, 12:20:50 PM »
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  • I had to shake my head when I read this on fαcebσσƙ. Have some people picked up a book since high school? Even then, you should have come across the world "knowledgeable" in your high school days a few times. No wonder we just had an openly stօʟɛn ɛʟɛctιօn, along with 99% free will mask adoption, a high rate of vaccination, and acceptance of the scamdemic in general.



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    Änσnymσus

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    Re: No shortage of idiots
    « Reply #1 on: May 02, 2021, 12:27:36 PM »
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  • I had to shake my head when I read this on fαcebσσƙ. Have some people picked up a book since high school? Even then, you should have come across the world "knowledgeable" in your high school days a few times. No wonder we just had an openly stօʟɛn ɛʟɛctιօn, along with 99% free will mask adoption, a high rate of vaccination, and acceptance of the scamdemic in general.
    Yeah, and no wonder people are still on facebook.


    Offline 2Vermont

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    Re: No shortage of idiots
    « Reply #2 on: May 02, 2021, 12:46:51 PM »
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  • LOL.  I just saw an ad for a t-shirt:  "Vaccιnαted: Because I'm not Stupid"




    "For there is not any thing secret that shall not be made manifest, nor hidden, that shall not be known and come abroad."- Luke 8:17

    Offline SimpleMan

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    Re: No shortage of idiots
    « Reply #3 on: May 02, 2021, 12:53:07 PM »
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  • There are scads of people who have experienced English primarily as a spoken language, and they can't spell for hell.   Moreover, some of them cannot even really write.  I have found that, almost invariably, they are very articulate speakers.  It is as though their command of the language is tilted entirely towards the spoken word, with reading, writing, and spelling being a kind of afterthought.  One way to spot this, is if when you give such a person something to read, either their lips move, or they start reading it out loud, word-for-word (or if they say "I don't have my glasses").

    People who speak a highly vernacularized form of English, with the grammatical and syntactical mistakes these people often make, are especially prone to this.  There is a large percentage of the American population that simply can't get their heads around "would have gone" as opposed to "would have went", "I saw" as opposed to "I seen", and so on --- once I was talking to a coworker who spoke in this "American joual" fashion about "would have gone" and she said "hit just don't sound right".  And then there is the amusing habit of people in the Southern Highlands who think anything that ends in an "s" sound is plural, such as "license", "patience", "tux" (tuxedo), and so on --- "did you get your license? --- yes, I got them".  I even had someone, not too long ago, complain of not being able to take a pulse, "I can't find them".  They think such words are like "glasses" or "pants".  And the word "an" does not exist south of Columbus, north of Atlanta, west of Roanoke, or east of Cincinnati--- "a apple", "a orange", "a egg" (which some pronounce quaintly as "aig").  Guess they'd really be screwed if they went to New England and tried to order "coffee an' " :jester:

    To be fair, I have a similar problem with Polish.  With all their diacriticals and those evil clusters of consonants, if I am going to write something in my very basic Polish, often I have to stop and think about it --- I know what I want to say, I just can't summon up the spelling part.

    Offline SimpleMan

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    Re: No shortage of idiots
    « Reply #4 on: May 02, 2021, 01:08:40 PM »
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  • LOL.  I just saw an ad for a t-shirt:  "Vaccιnαted: Because I'm not Stupid"
    At least they spelled everything right.

    Another tell-tale sign of "never having learned how to write properly" is the insertion of an apostrophe between the penultimate letter of a word and the "s" where it ends in an "s", what I've heard called the "greengrocer's apostrophe" --- "banana's", "apple's", and so on.  I've read some people's attempt to write properly, and it is as though they're just "winging it", placing the apostrophe before the "s" on some words but not others, with no rhyme or reason to it.  It's as though they're saying to themselves "I don't really know where it goes and where it doesn't, so I'll just guess and hope for the best". I once worked in an advertising layout shop, and when I challenged the boss's improper use of apostrophes (I was just doing my job, proofreading copy for errors), she dreamed up some lame explanation of how "possession denotes plurality", or maybe it was "plurality denotes possession", which indicated to me that she had stayed awake in Freshman Composition 101 just enough to learn the terms, without knowing what those terms meant.  She also got perturbed with me when I had to proofread ad slicks for stores in suburban Louisville, and I corrected her misspelling of "Shively", "Okolona", "Hurstbourne", and possibly others.  (To be fair, the spelling of those names is not exactly obvious just from the pronunciation.)  She said "that's the way we've always spelled them", and I just stood there thinking "yes, and you've always been wrong".  She didn't like me one bit.  Wonder why?

    And then there is the African American shibboleth of using possessives without the " 's ", as in "Sharon address", "Latisha store", etc.  I once received a letter from a black friend and she even spelled it that way.  This may be a native African thing.  I heard a Liberian woman on TV last night, with a strong accent, omitting the " 's " as she spoke.  This is even found in the familiar expression "baby daddy" or "baby mama".


     

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