Read an Interview with Matthew, the owner of CathInfo

Author Topic: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass  (Read 787 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Anonymous

  • Guest
lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
« on: January 20, 2019, 09:05:40 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • There was recently a eulogy at Resistance funeral, by some lay people related to the deceased.
    It took place after the priests sermon which was in the middle of Mass.
    Is this right?

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 09:17:00 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I heard at this one Mass somewhere, someone did something.  Can someone please confirm?


    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #2 on: January 20, 2019, 10:17:50 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I heard at this one Mass somewhere, someone did something.  Can someone please confirm?
    This is confirmed, ask anyone who was there if you don't believe me.

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #3 on: January 20, 2019, 11:01:35 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Is this not standard practice? 

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #4 on: January 20, 2019, 11:11:19 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • When I was young, only the priest gave the eulogy at the funeral Mass. Allowing laity to give eulogies was a post-Vatican II innovation taken from the Protestants.

    The wake, in which people gathered together at the home of the deceased, was a time to gather together to share a meal and a Rosary. Sometimes there was a eulogy or two given by a relative, but it consisted more of a sharing of memories, usually funny and/or spiritually uplifting.

    I attended a novus ordo funeral recently in which the nephew of the deceased gave a welcoming address and eulogy in the mortuary chapel before the priest arrived for the funeral mass.


    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #5 on: January 20, 2019, 11:35:23 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • This is confirmed, ask anyone who was there if you don't believe me.
    Should I ask that one guy?

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #6 on: January 20, 2019, 11:38:29 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • This is nothing new.  
    Fr. Voigt allowed the same three years ago.
    Residual conciliarism from a priest who never had a traditional priestly formation, which is why many SSPXers and now Resistance politely avoid his Masses.

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #7 on: January 20, 2019, 12:37:14 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Should I ask that one guy?
    I don't see why not. If not him, ask one of the other guys.


    Offline moneil

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 103
    • Reputation: +67/-4
    • Gender: Male
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #8 on: January 20, 2019, 02:09:39 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0

  • Quote
    There was recently a eulogy at Resistance funeral, by some lay people related to the deceased.
     It took place after the priests sermon which was in the middle of Mass.
     Is this right?


    Reply #5

    Quote
    When I was young, only the priest gave the eulogy at the funeral Mass … The wake, in which people gathered together at the home of the deceased, was a time to gather together to share a meal and a Rosary. Sometimes there was a eulogy or two given by a relative, but it consisted more of a sharing of memories, usually funny and/or spiritually uplifting.


    I am old enough to have attended Requiem Masses for grandparents and great aunts and uncles according to the 1962 (or earlier) Missal, as well as having served at many Requiem Masses while in parochial school.

    I can’t cite “chapter and verse” from the rubrics but the practice always was to say or sing the Mass without a sermon between the Mass of the Catechumens and the Mass of the Faithful.  At or toward the end of the Mass of the Faithful (perhaps after the “Ite, Missa est” … ? …I don’t remember) the priest would go to the pulpit to make some brief remarks.  The Epistle and Gospel were not reread in the vernacular as at Sunday Mass (the parish or the funeral home typically provided the St. Joseph Requiem Mass Booklet Missal for those who didn’t have a personal missal with them https://fraternitypublications.com/product/latin-english-requiem-mass-booklet-missal/).  Fr. Schmidt at St. Patrick’s in Pasco, WA almost always took his text from 2nd Maccabees 12:46.  If the priest had been acquainted with the deceased he might give an example or two that testified to the importance of their Catholic faith to them.  There might also be useful announcements: “Please turn on your headlights during the procession to the cemetery”; “There will be a luncheon in the parish hall following the burial.  Everyone is invited”.  Following these remarks was the Absolution at the casket.  The videos of John Kennedy’s funeral at St. Matthew’s Cathedral show the flow of this.

    In the 1969 Missal’s Mass of Christian Burial a homily is given at the normal time, following the Gospel.  A homily is specifically a discourse on the scripture readings just heard and the rubrics insist on this.

    Quote
    382. At Funeral Masses there should usually be a short Homily, but to the exclusion of a funeral eulogy of any kind.

    I recall another instruction that forbids eulogies and remembrances at a Funeral Mass, while allowing a reading of the obituary.  I believe this instruction also said that, if necessary for the circumstances, an instruction should be given to the congregation on who may or may not receive Holy Communion.  I apologize that I can’t take time at the moment to look it up and cite the source.  I am well aware that this instruction has been frequently ignored in some parishes, but working for a funeral home I am also observing that the younger priests are generally very strict about this instruction.

    The time and place for eulogies and remembrances is at the Vigil / Rosary service the evening before the Mass (typically held at the mortuary chapel though sometimes at the church, especially if a large crowd is anticipated;  Home wakes are very rare these days but the funeral home has done them) and/or at the funeral lunch following the Mass or burial.

    Offline Nadir

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 5711
    • Reputation: +3153/-163
    • Gender: Female
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #9 on: January 20, 2019, 02:28:01 PM »
  • Thanks!1
  • No Thanks!0
  • I don't see why not. If not him, ask one of the other guys.
    And one or two of the women. If you don't get the answer you want, then just keep asking.

    Thank you Moneil for that information. Very helpful.

    Offline JezusDeKoning

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2568
    • Reputation: +882/-790
    • Gender: Male
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #10 on: January 20, 2019, 03:36:30 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0

  • Reply #5


    I am old enough to have attended Requiem Masses for grandparents and great aunts and uncles according to the 1962 (or earlier) Missal, as well as having served at many Requiem Masses while in parochial school.

    I can’t cite “chapter and verse” from the rubrics but the practice always was to say or sing the Mass without a sermon between the Mass of the Catechumens and the Mass of the Faithful.  At or toward the end of the Mass of the Faithful (perhaps after the “Ite, Missa est” … ? …I don’t remember) the priest would go to the pulpit to make some brief remarks.  The Epistle and Gospel were not reread in the vernacular as at Sunday Mass (the parish or the funeral home typically provided the St. Joseph Requiem Mass Booklet Missal for those who didn’t have a personal missal with them https://fraternitypublications.com/product/latin-english-requiem-mass-booklet-missal/).  Fr. Schmidt at St. Patrick’s in Pasco, WA almost always took his text from 2nd Maccabees 12:46.  If the priest had been acquainted with the deceased he might give an example or two that testified to the importance of their Catholic faith to them.  There might also be useful announcements: “Please turn on your headlights during the procession to the cemetery”; “There will be a luncheon in the parish hall following the burial.  Everyone is invited”.  Following these remarks was the Absolution at the casket.  The videos of John Kennedy’s funeral at St. Matthew’s Cathedral show the flow of this.

    In the 1969 Missal’s Mass of Christian Burial a homily is given at the normal time, following the Gospel.  A homily is specifically a discourse on the scripture readings just heard and the rubrics insist on this.

    I recall another instruction that forbids eulogies and remembrances at a Funeral Mass, while allowing a reading of the obituary.  I believe this instruction also said that, if necessary for the circumstances, an instruction should be given to the congregation on who may or may not receive Holy Communion.  I apologize that I can’t take time at the moment to look it up and cite the source.  I am well aware that this instruction has been frequently ignored in some parishes, but working for a funeral home I am also observing that the younger priests are generally very strict about this instruction.

    The time and place for eulogies and remembrances is at the Vigil / Rosary service the evening before the Mass (typically held at the mortuary chapel though sometimes at the church, especially if a large crowd is anticipated;  Home wakes are very rare these days but the funeral home has done them) and/or at the funeral lunch following the Mass or burial.
    What Nadir said -- thank you for this.

    What an odd thing to have lay people doing anything, including a eulogy, during a sermon. From a group that split off from somewhere else because of its concerns about uniting with Rome, no less.

    The one exception could be translating the sermon from English to the language of the congregation -- I've personally seen that once or twice.
    Tío Samuel, ven pa 'aca


    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #11 on: January 21, 2019, 04:50:07 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Actually, the Church says that there should not be a eulogy at funeral masses.

    Anonymous

    • Guest
    Re: lay eulogy at Resistance Mass
    « Reply #12 on: January 21, 2019, 10:52:11 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Actually, the Church says that there should not be a eulogy at funeral masses.
    That is what I was taught.
    A layman-delivered eulogy is a Novus at best, protestant at worst, custom.
    We should be thinking of the Judgment during the Mass (the Church has us sing the Dies Irae) and praying for his soul. A funeral should be scary and somber, not light and joyful.
    But that's in the eyes of the Traditional Catholic Church.

     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16