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Author Topic: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)  (Read 407 times)

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Anonymous

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Re: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2019, 12:56:03 PM »
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  • So because there is no classical Catholic education available anywhere, it becomes permissible to get an anti catholic education?
    Once again:
    You have been told an acceptable college education does not exist (something your own comment acknowledges), but then because you want to go to college, you suppress that knowledge, and shoot the messenger.
    Then why ask advice?
    Go to college and become a liberal or atheist.
    Williamson went to Cambridge. Is he a liberal atheist?  How is a classical education anti-Catholic?

    Anonymous

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    Re: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)
    « Reply #16 on: August 13, 2019, 09:41:45 AM »
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  • What do you want to major in and where do you intend to live after college? If you want to make a career in MD you should choose St. Johns. Christendom has no prestige there. If you want to live in Virginia and plan to go into academia, Christendom may be fine for you. However, if you want to be a lawyer at a big time firm then don't go to Christendom. It means nothing in Virginia. 


    Anonymous

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    Re: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)
    « Reply #17 on: August 13, 2019, 06:08:11 PM »
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  • I went to Patrick Henry College for two years (We kind of had a friendly rivalry with Christendom.)  The school is NOT Catholic, but classical education seems to push people closer to Catholicism, I know a lot of people who converted from Protestantism.  Though all the ones I know are less traditionalist than me, and I'm not particularly trad by this forum's standards.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)
    « Reply #18 on: August 13, 2019, 06:17:33 PM »
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  • Williamson went to Cambridge. Is he a liberal atheist?  How is a classical education anti-Catholic?
    He was Anglican then.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Christendom College vs. St. John’s College (Annapolis)
    « Reply #19 on: August 13, 2019, 06:56:00 PM »
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  • Unless one comes from a wealthy family or you have support to set you up in business or a trade, some sort of post high school education is necessary unless your future consists of never leaving the parental nest.  Can a young man working at a few minimum wage jobs ever hope to establish his own family?  What about a woman who is without realistic prospect of marriage to a suitable man simply because there are none around?  Should she plan on a life of poverty after she can no longer live with her parents?  What of the young adult whose parents are not traditional or even Catholic?  
    A plan to be a drain on society is not Catholic.  I disagree with Bp. W.  In today’s world, college or post high school education is a necessity for MOST young adults.  
    It is the parents’ duty to raise their children so they are ready to go into the world without losing their faith.  It is the young person’s responsibility to develop self control and the convictions to live for God in spite of what others around him (or her) are doing.  There’s nothing amiss with staying home if not yet ready at age 18.  By the age of 21, a person should be prepared to live as a Catholic adult.
    Parents who believe the right college will protect and produce this are deluded.  No such places exist.  So if you aren’t ready to be a full adult, stay home and study on line.  Neither St. John’s nor Christendom will produce a well adjusted, mature Catholic adult.  
    What I’d suggest for those strong in their faith is to choose a secular university based upon your career goals located near a traditional chapel. Live off campus, not in the dormitory.  Work at a part time job and enroll in the school as an adult.  Depending upon the university, you may have to wait until age 21 or attend only part time.  Let school be the place where you acquire the knowledge and skills for your job or career.  Develop a spiritual and social life off campus unless you meet fellow Catholics.  
    University is for adults, not children, not adolescents, not for those without a spiritual and moral backbone.  
    (When Pius X said no non-Catholic school, he was referring to CHILDREN, not to adults.). 


     

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