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Are Women Priestesses the future?
« on: April 18, 2017, 12:53:10 AM »
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    Social worker Claudia Rocha is one of a number of women to lead services in churches in Portugal because of a shortage of Catholic priests
    Social worker Claudia Rocha is one of a number of women to lead services in churches in Portugal because of a shortage of Catholic priests (AFP Photo/PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA)
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    Reguengos de Monsaraz (Portugal) (AFP) - Facing a shortage of Roman Catholic priests, women churchgoers have stepped in to lead Sunday services in villages in southeastern Portugal, a sign the ageing communities are open to change.
    In the tiny church of Carrapatelo, a village overlooking the vineyards of the Reguengos de Monsaraz region, Claudia Rocha stands before a dozen mostly elderly female churchgoers wearing a black dress and sneakers.

    Her leather jacket and smartphone sit on the front-row bench as the 31-year-old leads what the church terms "Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest" with ease.
    After prayers and church hymns, she makes comments on the day's biblical reading, a form of preaching.
    At the end, Rocha hands out communion wafers representing the body of Christ that were blessed by the priest beforehand, but wine is not part of the ceremony.
    "This church would be closed if I wasn't here. Who cares if I am a woman, a deacon or a priest? What matters is having someone from the community who maintains our connection with the priest, even when he isn't here," she tells AFP.
    - No misgivings -
    A divorced social worker without children, she is one of 16 laypeople -- eight men and eight women -- chosen by Father Manuel Jose Marques to help ensure regular attendance at the seven parishes he presides over.
    "It might seem strange and new, but we haven't invented anything here. It's a tool that has long been set out in the Church's guidelines, for cases when it's absolutely necessary," says the 57-year-old priest.
    The practice of Sunday services being led by laypeople in a priest's absence take place in a number of countries, including Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Switzerland and the US.
    It began in the 1980s, when services were prepared with a priest or ordained clergy member, resembling mass but without the rite of consecrating bread for communion or the Eucharistic prayer.

    The Vatican and many clergy members have refused to encourage the practice, fearing a trivialisation of the tradition of Mass.
    Father Manuel had no such misgivings.
    To him, the need to set up Sunday services without a priest became apparent as soon as he took on his seven parishes around 16 years ago.
    Before, there had been three priests for the seven parishes in Reguengos de Monsaraz, a town in the region of Alentejo between Evora and the Spanish border.
    He assembled a group of 16 volunteers aged between 24 and 65 from varied backgrounds.
    "These are people who have experience with faith and welcoming Christ, and who know how to talk about it," he says, noting he makes no distinction between men and women.
    Lay women step in, too, in other rural parts of Portugal, whose population of 10 million is overwhelmingly Catholic but only counts around 3,500 priests for 4,400 congregations.
    - 'Very sensitive subject' -
    Last August, Pope Francis set up a group to study the role of women deacons in the early days of Christianity.
    While he ruled out the possibility of ordaining female priests, the move was considered a potentially historic opening towards a place for women in the Church.
    "It is a very sensitive subject, but what we have done is very simple. In this tiny village, we are quite a bit ahead of the Vatican," says Rocha.
    The progressive Father Manuel says he believes "women would be very good priests and deacons" but is quick to add: "It's not the opinion of one priest, or even 10 that makes theology."
    "We are living in the heart of an open community, the difference between men and women is no longer as strong as it was in the past," says Dora Cruz, who teaches catechism in Campinho, a village of 700 people.
    "But women's equality doesn't necessarily come from priesthood," adds the 31-year-old mother and kindergarten teacher.
    Members of the congregation approve of having a woman behind the altar.
    "People found it strange at first -- a woman leading Mass? But now we're used to it," says Angelica Vital, a 78-year-old pensioner.
    "If we're short of priests, I think they should be allowed to marry -- they are men, like any other!" she adds, with a devilish grin.

    Offline poche

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #1 on: April 18, 2017, 02:40:03 AM »
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  • The last time when Pope Francis was asked the question about the possibility of women priests the answer was a very quick "no!"


    Offline AnthonyB

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #2 on: February 25, 2018, 04:04:27 PM »
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  • The Church has declared, ex cathedra, that women will never be ordained as priests.  The moral of the story is:  The Holy Spirit is not a feminist (which is hardly surprising, since feminism is demonic!).

    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #3 on: February 25, 2018, 04:09:24 PM »
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  • A divorced social worker without children, she is one of 16 laypeople -- eight men and eight women -- chosen by Father Manuel Jose Marques

    Why am I not surprised...

    -Matthew

    Offline TKGS

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #4 on: February 25, 2018, 05:56:50 PM »
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  • Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #5 on: February 25, 2018, 07:27:50 PM »
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  • Why am I not surprised...

    -Matthew

    Took the words right off my fingertips.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #6 on: February 25, 2018, 07:33:37 PM »
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  • Priestesses are indeed the future in the Conciliar sect:

    https://novusordowatch.org/2018/02/women-priests-concelebrate-novus-ordo-bishops-mass/
    Most "priests" in Brazil are already women, lovers of men, so why not just go all the way and let real women do it.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #7 on: February 25, 2018, 07:36:43 PM »
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  • I follow what happens in the Vatican II church, the Novus Ordo religion, like I watch any other false religion, I don't. It's another religion. The crazier they get the better for those of good will who are still caught in the lie.


    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #8 on: February 25, 2018, 07:59:07 PM »
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  • You'd all better hope I don't hear your confession!  I just LOVE to gossip. :jester:

    Offline AnthonyB

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #9 on: February 25, 2018, 08:34:19 PM »
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  • Priestesses are indeed the future in the Conciliar sect:

    https://novusordowatch.org/2018/02/women-priests-concelebrate-novus-ordo-bishops-mass/
    Yes, that sounds right ... closely followed by queer marriage.

    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #10 on: February 25, 2018, 09:01:00 PM »
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  • Women priestesses is here in USA handing out communion.  Now more than ever there are baby boomer adult women altar servers while baby boomer men sit in pews. And their children and grand children are absent.  


    Offline poche

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #11 on: February 26, 2018, 03:23:55 AM »
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  • Offline poche

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #12 on: February 26, 2018, 03:25:25 AM »
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  • Women priestesses is here in USA handing out communion.  Now more than ever there are baby boomer adult women altar servers while baby boomer men sit in pews. And their children and grand children are absent.  
    That woman 'priestess' is not a validly ordained anything. 

    Offline AnthonyB

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #13 on: February 26, 2018, 06:40:25 PM »
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  • Most "priests" in Brazil are already women, lovers of men, so why not just go all the way and let real women do it.
    My parish priest is as camp as a row of tents.  I ran into him one day in a shop and he was wearing two ear-rings - one in his ear-lobe and one half-way up the same ear.  It sickened me.  One Sunday morning he (or someone with his permission) displayed a large photo of Conchita (that disgusting "bearded-lady" freak who won the Eurovision Song Contest) on the main table at the Church entrance - which I immediately grabbed, tore up and threw in the bin.  In his first week here he defended the parish's top layman, who regularly marches in Sydney's Gay Mardi Gras in support of his queer son.  Welcome to the Great Apostasy!

    Anonymous

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    Re: Are Women Priestesses the future?
    « Reply #14 on: February 26, 2018, 07:12:22 PM »
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  • My parish priest is as camp as a row of tents.  I ran into him one day in a shop and he was wearing two ear-rings - one in his ear-lobe and one half-way up the same ear.  It sickened me.  One Sunday morning he (or someone with his permission) displayed a large photo of Conchita (that disgusting "bearded-lady" freak who won the Eurovision Song Contest) on the main table at the Church entrance - which I immediately grabbed, tore up and threw in the bin.  In his first week here he defended the parish's top layman, who regularly marches in Sydney's Gay Mardi Gras in support of his queer son.  Welcome to the Great Apostasy!

    You really need to leave the Novus Ordo behind you, regardless of the existence (or non-existence) of Trad Mass options. You are better off staying at home on Sunday than putting your Faith at risk by attending a Novus Ordo.

     

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