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Author Topic: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review  (Read 1495 times)

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Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
« on: April 26, 2022, 10:18:25 AM »
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  • Yes, I already knew it's N.O. bs so I'll be anonymous.
    I went to the cinema to see it because I'm willing to break my wallet to support a bit more of Catholic representation. However, I was disappointed, I think not for the cinematography but the story itself. Ok I get it, they want to present a young man pursuing his vocation no matter what, but what about obedience? What about changing his way of talking after he entered the seminary? If it actually happened like that in real life then I guess I'm not surprised why people don't trust the Church. You don't give a chance for entering the seminary to a unqualified man just because he argued about it with his superior. You don't give a disabled person ordination out of fake charity. You don't talk with a woman in private when you're a priest especially that was a woman you had relation with. What this "priest" was doing in the story was completely revolutionary to the basic Catholic religious virtues.

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #1 on: April 26, 2022, 10:30:15 AM »
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  • I would like to see it if only for the encouragement to sanctify suffering and see it as a gift.  I've heard it does a good job on that point.  Plus understanding suffering is what is sorely missing in the NO.  Do you think they portrayed that well?

    There are many negatives though, such as you have pointed out and the fact that Mel and baby mommy girlfriend are promoting it which is a scandal to the Catholic faith.


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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #2 on: April 26, 2022, 10:44:20 AM »
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  • Sounds like he fits right in with the NO priesthood to me :cowboy:
    "For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears:" [2 Tim. 4:3]

    O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding the profane novelties of words, and oppositions of knowledge falsely so called. [1 Tim. 6:20]

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #3 on: April 26, 2022, 11:46:04 AM »
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  • I would like to see it if only for the encouragement to sanctify suffering and see it as a gift.  I've heard it does a good job on that point.  Plus understanding suffering is what is sorely missing in the NO.  Do you think they portrayed that well?

    There are many negatives though, such as you have pointed out and the fact that Mel and baby mommy girlfriend are promoting it which is a scandal to the Catholic faith.
    I guess the suffering part is pretty realistic, but for such internal spiritual fight it's not going to be shown very well on the screen anyway. At least when I watched it I saw him yelling at Our Lord angrily, and then all in sudden he's ok and started to preach to other people his understanding about his suffering. 



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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #4 on: April 26, 2022, 11:57:17 AM »
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  • You don't talk with a woman in private when you're a priest[...]
    Please, could someone explain this? It strikes me as totally foreign, like it does not occur to me what Catholic teaching forbids this, and such a seemingly absurd rule would never occur to me in a hundred years! Is this an American cultural thing? I'm Hispanic. As far as I know, the universal Church has never forbidden this. I would appreciate some sources on this, please.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #5 on: April 26, 2022, 11:58:36 AM »
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  • Please, could someone explain this? It strikes me as totally foreign, like it does not occur to me what Catholic teaching forbids this, and such a seemingly absurd rule would never occur to me in a hundred years! Is this an American cultural thing? I'm Hispanic. As far as I know, the universal Church has never forbidden this. I would appreciate some sources on this, please.

    There's no law against it, but it's highly imprudent and should generally be avoided.

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #6 on: April 26, 2022, 12:14:09 PM »
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    Mel and baby mommy girlfriend 
    Yeah, Mel’s girlfriend wrote the script…and she’s not even Catholic.  :facepalm:  I’m sure this movie has decent human drama (to the extent that Mark W can act…which is limited), but it won’t be good Catholic drama.  Typical novus ordo…let’s bring Catholicism to “the worldly” which ends up destroying the true catholic message.  (I’ve not seen it but that’s what I gather from reviews).

    Offline Pax Vobis

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #7 on: April 26, 2022, 12:16:16 PM »
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  • That was me.


    Offline Philothea3

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #8 on: April 26, 2022, 01:15:33 PM »
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  • Please, could someone explain this? It strikes me as totally foreign, like it does not occur to me what Catholic teaching forbids this, and such a seemingly absurd rule would never occur to me in a hundred years! Is this an American cultural thing? I'm Hispanic. As far as I know, the universal Church has never forbidden this. I would appreciate some sources on this, please.
    How is that an absurd rule? It's not like a church doctrine but I believe most seminary formation would have mentioned it. Also not even for priests, usually the 2 people of the opposite sexes should avoid spending time together privately. And it's just a typical common sense to avoid scandal and temptation which is not so commonly known anymore. For example, St Pius V wouldn't even ride in the same carriage with his holiness's own sister.
    THY WILL BE DONE ON EARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVEN
    so that we may love you with all our heart, by always having you in mind; with all our soul, by always longing for you; with all our mind, by determining to seek your glory in everything; 
    and with all our strength, of body and soul...

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #9 on: May 13, 2022, 02:34:33 AM »
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  • I saw the movie and wondered about many things.  How could "Stu" be approved to be a priest when he could not function and do Mass?  Just the NO but still he could only listen to confessions.  How could he keep using bad language when he was striving for the priesthood?  They made it seem God used him over many years in his affliction (lived to be 50).  I left the NO many years ago, and do not regard that as a true Mass, but a false church and this movie just confirmed that even more.  I agree  "You don't give a chance for entering the seminary to a unqualified man just because he argued about it with his superior. You don't give a disabled person ordination out of fake charity."

    Offline SimpleMan

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #10 on: May 13, 2022, 08:57:10 AM »
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  • I saw the movie and wondered about many things.  How could "Stu" be approved to be a priest when he could not function and do Mass?  Just the NO but still he could only listen to confessions.  How could he keep using bad language when he was striving for the priesthood?  They made it seem God used him over many years in his affliction (lived to be 50).  I left the NO many years ago, and do not regard that as a true Mass, but a false church and this movie just confirmed that even more.  I agree  "You don't give a chance for entering the seminary to a unqualified man just because he argued about it with his superior. You don't give a disabled person ordination out of fake charity."
    They are so hard up for vocations that they'll take just about anybody (unless, of course, he is a traditionalist and wants to celebrate the TLM).  I have even heard of a case where a priest was ordained who was autistic, and they were trying to find a way for him to say Mass nonverbally.  Words fail me. (No pun intended.)  They also attempt to offer Mass celebrated in American Sign Language.

    As an aside, the Traditional Latin Mass, especially Low Mass, is made to order for autistic people.  There is no constant assault upon the senses, and the silence seems to dovetail nicely with autism.  It is also far less demanding upon deaf people.  With the way that every "difference in ability" is accommodated in our society nowadays (some of this good, some of this "run into the ground"), you'd think that modernist bishops would be all over a Mass that is more accessible to those with sensory issues.  But no.



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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #11 on: May 13, 2022, 11:29:52 AM »
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  • TIA reviewes it:
    https://www.traditioninaction.org/movies/054_Stu.htm

    Last week Tradition in Action received an urgent request: "Could you please write a review of the new Father Stu film? Our Latin Mass parish priest is promoting the movie from the pulpit and I am shocked about it. I have not watched the movie myself but the few reviews online are sending alarm bells."

    It has been a long while since I have ventured into an AMC theater, and I hesitated a moment to enter the wolves' den. But the exigency of the request and timeliness of the topic won the day, and yesterday I viewed Father Stu.

    Today, I can, without a moment's hesitation, assure our reader it was no false alarm when the bells of her sensus fidelium sounded. The 'R' movie fully earned its rating: Father Stu is blasphemous and immoral, the characters are incredibly vulgar and shamefully immodest.

    Worse still, the film undermines Traditionalism and strongly promotes the Vatican II vision of the Church: casual, egalitarian and tolerant, embracing the customs and ways of the Modern World. This evil is worked in an ambience saturated with sentimentality and emotion. The middle-aged Latino woman sitting to my right sobbed audibly nine times during the two-hour movie.

    A 'baptism' of blasphemy & immorality

    Father Stu (played by Mark Wahlberg) is based on the true story of Stuart Long, an amateur washed-out boxer in Montana who moves to Hollywood to pursue an acting career. He leaves his very dysfunctional and foul-mouthed mother (Jacki Weaver) to find the good life in California, where his equally dysfunctional and even more foul-mouthed father (Mel Gibson) lives.

    Stuart Long Mark Walburg in churchNovus Ordo priests, church & mentality in full force
    While working in a meat market in LA, he sees and instantly falls madly in love with Carmen (Teresa Ruiz), a supposedly strong Catholic who is attracted enough to Stu to ignore his filthy language, too coarse to describe here.

    She demands his "baptism" (rather than a true conversion) before they "date," and he is duly catechized in modern sit-around-and-testify catechesis sessions. At the baptismal fount, he strips to bare his very "buff" torso, raising smiles from the priest and the admiring women present.

    Here is an early example of how everything that should be serious and sacral is treated very lightly and casually. Such a sacrilegious baptism should not be entertaining for anyone who takes the Church, priesthood and the Sacraments seriously.

    Let me insert here that this supposedly very religious Carmen is a modern Catholic. She wears seductive clothing and could not be more sensuous when she and Stu sing “Jackson” together at a karaoke bar where all the young Catholics gather. That is to say, she – like all the other young Catholics and priests in the film – is more Protestant than Catholic.

    Father Stu serves a syrupy dish of a sentimental religion of forgiveness and love, complete with mushy country rock music strumming in the background of religious scenes. God is good and forgiving – which in fact is true – and conversion does not demand any radical change in customs or ways of being – which is untrue. Nothing on the plate reflects the doctrinal, ceremonial and firm Catholicism of the past.


    More Protestant than Catholic


    Let us return to the story. After an encounter in a bar with a scarred-face old-hippie Jesus-figure who tells Stu not to drink and drive, a very sotted Stu drives home on his motorcycle and has a terrible accident. Unconscious and bloody, a Latino Virgin Mary appears to him in a soppy scene and tells him he will not die from this. The woman next to me burst into sobs.



    carmen and stu singing karioke in barA provocative karaoke bar scene with Stu & Carmen

    Stu does not die, but recovers. The Rosary and the Blessed Virgin statue make their appearances, and sentimental Catholics like my seatmate swoon with emotion: "Oh! See how Catholic the movie is!" But it is not. During Stu's transformation, we actually have a scene of fornication between the "chaste" Carmen and "reformed" Stu.



    When Stu confesses this grave sin to the priest, he does so with his typical foul language and no sign of contrition. He is too absorbed in his experience with Christ to bother with that. In fact, in the various confession scenes, we never witness contrition or absolution.


    Again, the attitudes and actions are more Protestant than Catholic. It is the Vatican II Church that is celebrated here. Blasphemy and immorality are ignored; what counts is the emotional high of finding Jesus, with a little bit of the Virgin thrown in to satisfy the sentimentally pious Catholics.



    The rest of the story


    Stu recovers and becomes convinced God is calling him to the priesthood. He storms into the Monsignor's office to protest the Church's banality for considering the legal liabilities of accepting an explosive and violent ex-criminal into the seminary. Of course, the Monsignor relents and Stu enters the seminary.



    likeable StuVisiting the Monsignor to argue his case

    In the seminary, Stu is the most attractive person there because he is the only masculine one. So the tough, still foul-mouthed, vulgar and always casual Stu wins the hearts of the modern audience, while his stuffy roommate (Cody Fern), always prim, purse-lipped and disapproving of Stu's irreverence and jokes, plays the ugly role of the traditionalist whom Pope Francis so despises and ridicules.



    So, what is correct and proper becomes the object of scorn and despisal. I certainly did not like the holier-than-thou seminarian. Nor did the woman sitting next to me, who laughed heartily at all Stu's antics and bad words, cheering on his revolutionary spirit of rebellion. Any unsuspecting person watching Father Stu may likewise find himself justifying the Conciliar Church with all of its abuses because everything is so craftily manipulated to make the viewer become like the punk seminarian Stu.



    And so Stu advances in the Novus Ordo seminary – always on his terms, we see no attempt by the church authorities to correct his vices. Suddenly one day he collapses on the basketball court and is diagnosed with Inclusion Body Myositis, a rare and incurable muscular degenerative disease that will ultimately claim his life.



    screamScreaming furiously at God in church

    He responds, of course, with a first fury, since he has not been taught to master his passions. The rest of the film is a Protestant-style redemption story. Admirably, he comes to accept the suffering God has given him; sadly there is no contrition or real conversion. There are, however, many, many sobs and tears from my neighbor woman to the right.



    Further, this conformity to the will of God does not mean that Father Stu must leave off his blasphemous language, sarcastic exchanges with his parents and fits of anger. We – like God – must accept him as he is and love him even with his defects. It is Protestantism, not Catholicism.



    When he is told by the Monsignor that he cannot become a priest because his degenerative disease could cause him to drop the Sacred Host or spill the Precious Blood of Christ or disgrace his priestly duties, he dismisses these arguments as irrelevant. What is important is that Father Stu will help people.



    mel gibson mark walburg father stuHis father (Gibson) encourages Stu to shoot himself rather than be a priest

    Our Lord Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament is relegated to a secondary place next to human emotions and the conversion experience. I found this blasphemous and shocking, although I should have expected no more from a movie that overall shows little to no respect for the True Presence.


    In the end, Father Stu "converts" his parents (we are not sure this conversion means a return to the practice of the Catholic Faith) and becomes a priest.



    Outside the boundaries of decency


    I hope I have said enough for serious Catholic clergy and parents to realize that Father Stu did not stay within the boundaries of decency. This is not "a movie for everyone," as the film's promoters boast. It is not a movie for those who still believe blasphemy and immorality are never acceptable viewing material, especially when it is wrapped in attractive paper.



    From beginning to end – an early scene shows young Stu dressed only in his underpants and socks dancing provocatively to Elvis Presley music while his half-drunk father mocks him – you will encounter disturbing and offensive scenes.



    In short, viewers are invited to enter the sheep yard and smell the manure, to mix with the degenerate to save them rather than raise them to a higher plane. It is exactly what Francis counsels Catholics to do, to embrace and enter into the ugliness and messiness of life.



    The trouble with this redemption story is that we never leave the barnyard. There is no conversion from the corrupted customs of the Modern World and the tolerant religion of the Vatican II, which are presented as amusing and normal.



    mel gibson rosaline RossGibson's ‘girlfriend’ directed the film

    I would like to add a final word about Mel Gibson, who plays Stu's father. Because he has called himself a traditionalist Catholic, many Catholics consider his presence a guarantee of orthodoxy.



    This is faulty reasoning. I think it extremely telling to know that the film is scripted and directed by Rosalind Ross, Gibson’s 31-year-old longtime "girlfriend" with whom he has a 4-year-son. It is a bug-eyed and somewhat unhinged Gibson we see in the film, given to outbursts of rage and blasphemous language, and consistently behaving in a vulgar and crude way. I had the impression that the haunting personal despair he plays so perfectly is not a role, but a reality.


    Gibson himself – like Stu's father – seems confused and lost, hopeful and desperate for a redemption. But that victory will come only with leaving the futile life of sin and having a true contrition. We never see this contrition in Fr. Stu or his father, but I hope and pray that in fact Our Lady has mercy and gives an honest Catholic conversion to Gibson, who gave the world The Passion of the Christ.


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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #12 on: May 13, 2022, 12:39:34 PM »
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    It is a bug-eyed and somewhat unhinged Gibson we see in the film, given to outbursts of rage and blasphemous language, and consistently behaving in a vulgar and crude way. I had the impression that the haunting personal despair he plays so perfectly is not a role, but a reality.
    Great review.  This comment I especially agree with.  Sad but true.

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #13 on: May 13, 2022, 01:54:43 PM »
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  • TIA reviewes it:
    https://www.traditioninaction.org/movies/054_Stu.htm

    Last week Tradition in Action received an urgent request: "Could you please write a review of the new Father Stu film? Our Latin Mass parish priest is promoting the movie from the pulpit and I am shocked about it. I have not watched the movie myself but the few reviews online are sending alarm bells."

    It has been a long while since I have ventured into an AMC theater, and I hesitated a moment to enter the wolves' den. But the exigency of the request and timeliness of the topic won the day, and yesterday I viewed Father Stu.

    Today, I can, without a moment's hesitation, assure our reader it was no false alarm when the bells of her sensus fidelium sounded. The 'R' movie fully earned its rating: Father Stu is blasphemous and immoral, the characters are incredibly vulgar and shamefully immodest.

    Worse still, the film undermines Traditionalism and strongly promotes the Vatican II vision of the Church: casual, egalitarian and tolerant, embracing the customs and ways of the Modern World. This evil is worked in an ambience saturated with sentimentality and emotion. The middle-aged Latino woman sitting to my right sobbed audibly nine times during the two-hour movie.

    A 'baptism' of blasphemy & immorality

    Father Stu (played by Mark Wahlberg) is based on the true story of Stuart Long, an amateur washed-out boxer in Montana who moves to Hollywood to pursue an acting career. He leaves his very dysfunctional and foul-mouthed mother (Jacki Weaver) to find the good life in California, where his equally dysfunctional and even more foul-mouthed father (Mel Gibson) lives.

    Stuart Long Mark Walburg in churchNovus Ordo priests, church & mentality in full force
    While working in a meat market in LA, he sees and instantly falls madly in love with Carmen (Teresa Ruiz), a supposedly strong Catholic who is attracted enough to Stu to ignore his filthy language, too coarse to describe here.

    She demands his "baptism" (rather than a true conversion) before they "date," and he is duly catechized in modern sit-around-and-testify catechesis sessions. At the baptismal fount, he strips to bare his very "buff" torso, raising smiles from the priest and the admiring women present.

    Here is an early example of how everything that should be serious and sacral is treated very lightly and casually. Such a sacrilegious baptism should not be entertaining for anyone who takes the Church, priesthood and the Sacraments seriously.

    Let me insert here that this supposedly very religious Carmen is a modern Catholic. She wears seductive clothing and could not be more sensuous when she and Stu sing “Jackson” together at a karaoke bar where all the young Catholics gather. That is to say, she – like all the other young Catholics and priests in the film – is more Protestant than Catholic.

    Father Stu serves a syrupy dish of a sentimental religion of forgiveness and love, complete with mushy country rock music strumming in the background of religious scenes. God is good and forgiving – which in fact is true – and conversion does not demand any radical change in customs or ways of being – which is untrue. Nothing on the plate reflects the doctrinal, ceremonial and firm Catholicism of the past.


    More Protestant than Catholic


    Let us return to the story. After an encounter in a bar with a scarred-face old-hippie Jesus-figure who tells Stu not to drink and drive, a very sotted Stu drives home on his motorcycle and has a terrible accident. Unconscious and bloody, a Latino Virgin Mary appears to him in a soppy scene and tells him he will not die from this. The woman next to me burst into sobs.



    carmen and stu singing karioke in barA provocative karaoke bar scene with Stu & Carmen

    Stu does not die, but recovers. The Rosary and the Blessed Virgin statue make their appearances, and sentimental Catholics like my seatmate swoon with emotion: "Oh! See how Catholic the movie is!" But it is not. During Stu's transformation, we actually have a scene of fornication between the "chaste" Carmen and "reformed" Stu.



    When Stu confesses this grave sin to the priest, he does so with his typical foul language and no sign of contrition. He is too absorbed in his experience with Christ to bother with that. In fact, in the various confession scenes, we never witness contrition or absolution.


    Again, the attitudes and actions are more Protestant than Catholic. It is the Vatican II Church that is celebrated here. Blasphemy and immorality are ignored; what counts is the emotional high of finding Jesus, with a little bit of the Virgin thrown in to satisfy the sentimentally pious Catholics.



    The rest of the story


    Stu recovers and becomes convinced God is calling him to the priesthood. He storms into the Monsignor's office to protest the Church's banality for considering the legal liabilities of accepting an explosive and violent ex-criminal into the seminary. Of course, the Monsignor relents and Stu enters the seminary.



    likeable StuVisiting the Monsignor to argue his case

    In the seminary, Stu is the most attractive person there because he is the only masculine one. So the tough, still foul-mouthed, vulgar and always casual Stu wins the hearts of the modern audience, while his stuffy roommate (Cody Fern), always prim, purse-lipped and disapproving of Stu's irreverence and jokes, plays the ugly role of the traditionalist whom Pope Francis so despises and ridicules.



    So, what is correct and proper becomes the object of scorn and despisal. I certainly did not like the holier-than-thou seminarian. Nor did the woman sitting next to me, who laughed heartily at all Stu's antics and bad words, cheering on his revolutionary spirit of rebellion. Any unsuspecting person watching Father Stu may likewise find himself justifying the Conciliar Church with all of its abuses because everything is so craftily manipulated to make the viewer become like the punk seminarian Stu.



    And so Stu advances in the Novus Ordo seminary – always on his terms, we see no attempt by the church authorities to correct his vices. Suddenly one day he collapses on the basketball court and is diagnosed with Inclusion Body Myositis, a rare and incurable muscular degenerative disease that will ultimately claim his life.



    screamScreaming furiously at God in church

    He responds, of course, with a first fury, since he has not been taught to master his passions. The rest of the film is a Protestant-style redemption story. Admirably, he comes to accept the suffering God has given him; sadly there is no contrition or real conversion. There are, however, many, many sobs and tears from my neighbor woman to the right.



    Further, this conformity to the will of God does not mean that Father Stu must leave off his blasphemous language, sarcastic exchanges with his parents and fits of anger. We – like God – must accept him as he is and love him even with his defects. It is Protestantism, not Catholicism.



    When he is told by the Monsignor that he cannot become a priest because his degenerative disease could cause him to drop the Sacred Host or spill the Precious Blood of Christ or disgrace his priestly duties, he dismisses these arguments as irrelevant. What is important is that Father Stu will help people.



    mel gibson mark walburg father stuHis father (Gibson) encourages Stu to shoot himself rather than be a priest

    Our Lord Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament is relegated to a secondary place next to human emotions and the conversion experience. I found this blasphemous and shocking, although I should have expected no more from a movie that overall shows little to no respect for the True Presence.


    In the end, Father Stu "converts" his parents (we are not sure this conversion means a return to the practice of the Catholic Faith) and becomes a priest.



    Outside the boundaries of decency


    I hope I have said enough for serious Catholic clergy and parents to realize that Father Stu did not stay within the boundaries of decency. This is not "a movie for everyone," as the film's promoters boast. It is not a movie for those who still believe blasphemy and immorality are never acceptable viewing material, especially when it is wrapped in attractive paper.



    From beginning to end – an early scene shows young Stu dressed only in his underpants and socks dancing provocatively to Elvis Presley music while his half-drunk father mocks him – you will encounter disturbing and offensive scenes.



    In short, viewers are invited to enter the sheep yard and smell the manure, to mix with the degenerate to save them rather than raise them to a higher plane. It is exactly what Francis counsels Catholics to do, to embrace and enter into the ugliness and messiness of life.



    The trouble with this redemption story is that we never leave the barnyard. There is no conversion from the corrupted customs of the Modern World and the tolerant religion of the Vatican II, which are presented as amusing and normal.



    mel gibson rosaline RossGibson's ‘girlfriend’ directed the film

    I would like to add a final word about Mel Gibson, who plays Stu's father. Because he has called himself a traditionalist Catholic, many Catholics consider his presence a guarantee of orthodoxy.



    This is faulty reasoning. I think it extremely telling to know that the film is scripted and directed by Rosalind Ross, Gibson’s 31-year-old longtime "girlfriend" with whom he has a 4-year-son. It is a bug-eyed and somewhat unhinged Gibson we see in the film, given to outbursts of rage and blasphemous language, and consistently behaving in a vulgar and crude way. I had the impression that the haunting personal despair he plays so perfectly is not a role, but a reality.


    Gibson himself – like Stu's father – seems confused and lost, hopeful and desperate for a redemption. But that victory will come only with leaving the futile life of sin and having a true contrition. We never see this contrition in Fr. Stu or his father, but I hope and pray that in fact Our Lady has mercy and gives an honest Catholic conversion to Gibson, who gave the world The Passion of the Christ.

    TIA is right this time. I regret so much for inviting my friends to go watch this with me. 

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    Re: Anyone else watched Fr Stu? Honest Review
    « Reply #14 on: May 13, 2022, 02:31:36 PM »
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  • That comment above about the bug eyes ... I've referred to it before.  You get the sense the way his eyes move that he's constantly having a conversation in his head, that he's troubled.  And, yes, it's reality.  You can't have the faith (which he does) ... and not constantly be tormented about living in sin.